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Archive entry for August 2020

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August 2020

Edgewise! (more filet crochet)

FiletEdging.jpg

"A lovely idea for enhancing plain curtains is to make this floral pattern filet crochet border."
— again very true, but still quite a commitment if you are to make them looking as splendid as in the photo; as noted in the other posts this month, filet crochet is not technically difficult, but quite laborious.
This border is worked in No 20 cotton on a 2mm hook - still fairly fine but not quite so taxing as lace. Note that it could be adapted for an edging for a table cloth or table runner.

If you want to crochet a little something, and the mere thought of this gives you a headache, then try the little bonus pattern for a flower spray.

Filet Crochet

The crochet stitches used in filet crochet are very simple, consisting of "tall" stitches which in this patter are trebles, and chain stitches combined together to create a mesh of "spaces"; some of these spaces are filled in with "blocks" of the tall stitches, hence the pattern can be represented with a chart, that shows you how the spaces and blocks are arranged. You will see how this works as I explain below.

In these examples the "tall" stitches are shown as trebles.

Spaces (sp)

Spaces are made by making 2 chain, missing 2 (or the same as the number of chain) stitches, then "tall" stitch into the next stitch.
The picture shows making 2 chain, missing 2 stitches and making the tall stitches trebles. You are left with a square hole which is the "space".

Blocks (blk)

To make a block you fill in the space with tall stitches.
In our example you put 2 stitches into what would have been the space; this replaces the chains and missed stitches and creates a "block" of 4 tall stitches: two that would have been part of the mesh of spaces and 2 that fill in the space.

The picture shows making 1 treble into each of the next 4 stitches (starting 3 chain counts as 1 treble), 2 chain, miss 2 stitches, 1 treble into the next stitch, 1 treble into the next 3 stitches (makes a block of 4).

As you continue in a pattern, you should ensure that your basic mesh is preserved, so that the trebles that make the framework of the spaces all sit evenly above one another, not offset like brickwork (unless of course that is part of the pattern!). In general the pattern is created by the blocks, rather like giant pixels making an overall picture.
This method of working is in fact very simple; you just need patience.

Instructions

The vertical (side) edging is worked first, from the bottom, starting with shaping the mitred corner as shown in the chart; then work on upwards to the required length, after which you fasten off. Next, you pick up at the mitred corner at the bottom of the side panel and work short rows across the mitre until al the stitches are incorporated, and you are working the horizontal (bottom) panel at 90 degrees to the side edging - also as shown in the chart. Work to the require width of your curtain, then fasten off.

Vertical Side Panel

Begin at lower outer corner, make 11 chain, work 1 tr in 8th chain from hook, 1 tr in 3 chain, turn.

1st row (right side): 3 chain, miss 1 tr, 1 tr in 3 tr, 2 chain, 1 tr in 3rd chain, turn.

2nd row: 10 chain, 1 tr in 8th chain from hook; (2 chain, 1 tr in next tr) twice, 1 tr in 2 tr, 1 tr in top of 3 chain.

3rd row: 3 chain, miss 1 tr, 1 tr in 3 tr; (2 chain, 1 tr in next tr), twice, 2 chain, 1 tr in 3rd chain.

Working bracketed instructions twice more on every repeat, repeat 2nd and 3rd rows 3 times more.

Begin filet pattern thus:

10th row: 10 chain, 1 tr in 8th chain from hook, 2 chain, 1 tr in next tr, 2 tr in chain space, 1 tr in next tr, (2 chain, 1 tr in next tr) 8 times, 1 tr in 2 tr, 1 tr in top of 3 chain.

11th row:—3 chain, miss 1 tr, 1 tr in 3 tr, (2 chain, 1 tr in next tr) 8 times, 1 tr in next 2 tr, (l tr in next tr, 2 chain) twice, 1 tr in 3rd chain.

12th row: 8 chain, 1 tr in 4th chain from hook, 1 tr in next 2 chain, (2 chain, 1 tr in next tr) twice, 2 tr in chain space, 1 tr in next 4 tr, (2 chain, 1 tr in next tr) 8 times, 1 tr in 2 tr, 1 tr in 3rd chain.

Beginning with 13th row, continue working from chart (each square marked in blue worked by 2 tr in 2-chain space or previous trs as given on 10th, 11th and 12th rows) until 40th row is worked, and the mitre shaping is complete.
Continue working from chart until 73rd row is completed.
* Working chart rows in reverse by reading even rows from left to right and odd rows from right to left, work from 74th to 123rd row. Repeat from * until shorter edge of border is length required to fit your curtain.
Fasten off.

Horizontal Lower Panel

With wrong side of vertical panel facing, join cotton to outer corner.
Make 8 chain, 1 tr in 4th chain from hook, 1 tr in 4 chain, slip stitch in base of 4th tr of foundation of vertical panel; slip stitch along 2 chain of foundation, turn.
[Editors note: You are creating the mitred corner shaping, and joining to the side panel at the same time.]

1st row (right side): 2 chain, miss 2 tr, 1 tr in 3 tr, 1 tr in top of 3 chain, turn.
2nd row: 3 chain, miss 1 tr, 1 tr in 3 tr, * 2 chain, 1 tr in top of slip stitch, 2 chain, 1 tr in same chain as 1 tr of vertical panel, 2 chain, slip stitch in base of tr, slip stitch along 2 chain, turn *.
3rd row: (2 chain, 1 tr in next tr) 3 times, 1 tr in 2 tr, 1 tr in top of 3 chain, turn.
4th row: chain, miss 1 tr, 1 tr in 3 tr, (2 chain, 1 tr in next tr), twice, repeat from * to * of 2nd row.

Working bracketed instructions twice more on every repeat, repeat 3rd and 4th rows 4 times, then repeat 3rd row again.

14th row: 3 chain, miss 1 tr, 1 tr in 3 tr, (2 chain, 1 tr in next tr) 12 times, 2 chain, 1 tr in top of slip stitch, 2 tr in chain space, 1 tr in same chain as tr, 2 tr around bar of tr, slip stitch in base of tr, turn.

Turn chart sideways and continue working from chart, beginning with 15th row, still shaping corner as set until 41st row is completed.

42nd row: Pattern to 1 tr in top of slip stitch, 3 tr in end tr of 40th row of side panel, turn.

Continue working from chart until 94th row is completed.
Repeat 67th to 94th rows until shorter inner edge is length required less 19 cm or 7½, inches.
Then work from 95th to 125th to finish off.
Fasten off.

Making Up:

Pin out work a section at a time and block.
Sew around your curtain or fabric.

Materials

One ball of Twilleys Twenty will make approximately 26½cm or 10½ inches of border.
[Editors note:This is a No 20 cotton which came in 20g balls approximately 100m in length.]

2mm crochet hook.

Ready-made curtains, or a length of voile or appropriate fabric to make your own.

Tension

8 holes (spaces) to 2 inches or 5cm.

Size matters

Length as required.
Width: 10½ inches.
[Editors note:Make sure you check this out if you decide to change the thread and hook sizes.]

Crochet abbreviations:

ch: chain
ss: slip stitch
sp: space - work 2 ch, miss 2 sts, work 1 tr into next st.
tr: treble.

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet; htr is equivalent to US double crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Disclaimer (well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading. If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

EdgewiseChart.png

You can access a larger version of the chart - right click on the icon below and choose "save link as" or "save target as" (browser dependent options) to download and save a pdf file.

Curtains in Filet Crochet

FiletCurtains.jpg

"These delightful curtains will give your home a brighter look."
— which is very true I'm sure, provided you have the skill and patience to make them.
If you are up to speed with crochet — and I'm guessing you won't attempt this unless you are — then it would be quite feasible to adapt to a slightly thicker crochet cotton and fewer repeats, in both width and length, using the chart as a guide.

If you want to crochet a little something, and the mere thought of this gives you a headache, then try the little bonus pattern for a flower spray.

Filet Crochet

This pattern as originally written does not appear to provide any explanation of the abbreviations, so unless you are competent in the method of filet crochet, it could be hard to understand. So I am providing some expanded notes on the method here.

The crochet stitches used in filet crochet are very simple, consisting of "tall" stitches that could be trebles, (or double trebles or triple trebles), and chain stitches combined together to create a mesh of "spaces"; some of these spaces are filled in with "blocks" of the tall stitches, hence the pattern can be represented with a chart, that shows you how the spaces and blocks are arranged. You will see how this works as I explain below.

In these examples the tall stitches are shown as trebles.

Spaces (sp)

Spaces are made by making 2 (or more) chain, missing 2 (or the same as the number of chain) stitches, then "tall" stitch into the next stitch.
The picture shows making 2 chain, missing 2 stitches and making the tall stitches trebles. You are left with a square hole which is the "space".

Blocks (blk)

To make a block you fill in the space with tall stitches.
In our example you put 2 stitches into what would have been the space; this replaces the chains and missed stitches and creates a "block" of 4 tall stitches: two that would have been part of the mesh of spaces and 2 that fill in the space.

The picture shows making 1 treble into each of the next 4 stitches (starting 3 chain counts as 1 treble), 2 chain, miss 2 stitches, 1 treble into the next stitch, 1 treble into the next 3 stitches (makes a block of 4).

As you continue in a pattern, you should ensure that your basic mesh is preserved, so that the trebles that make the framework of the spaces all sit evenly above one another, not offset like brickwork (unless of course that is part of the pattern!). In general the pattern is created by the blocks, rather like giant pixels making an overall picture.
This method of working is in fact very simple, although, I have to be frank, quite laborious.

Notes for this vintage pattern:

There are several considerations here: firstly the finess of the thread they specify; secondly the size of the hook needed, thirdly the tall stitch they used; and finally the spaces and blocks.

No 60 thread is very fine - like sewing cotton - I can only point out that a curtain is a movable feast, and provided you check the tension, you could adapt it. For your sanity you might want to try out with the rather more usual No 20 cotton (the lower the number the thicker the thread).

The No 5½ crochet hook is not a specification in mm. You can read about imperial hook sizes using the link in the side bar. This is going to be the type of tiny steel hook used in lace making equivalent to about ¾mm.
If you use No 20 cotton then an imperial No 3, 1¼mm (1.25mm) crochet hook might be appropriate.

The "tall" stitch here is abbreviated to "ltr" which is "long treble" I believe, and I'm given to understand that this is a triple treble.
This is made by passing the hook under the thread of the left hand 3 times, before inserting the hook into the next stitch and pulling through the loop as usual; there are 5 loops on the hook as in the picture. Pass the thread over the hook and pull through 2 loops on the hook, and repeat this manoeuvre 3 times until there is one loop left on the hook and you are ready to start the next stitch.

However although the spaces in this pattern are worked with 3 chain rather than 2, the mesh in the picture looks square, and it implies to me that the "ltr" might be a double treble rather than triple. Again, I would try a sample swatch to see how it looks. And just to encourage you - swatching in crochet is much quicker than knitting.

Here is picture of double trebles; made the same way as triple trebles, but start by passing the hook under the thread of the left hand twice instead of 3 times.

The spaces and blocks for this pattern are worked over 4 stitch repeats rather that 3 as in the examples. A space is made by working 3 chain and missing 3 stitches before the next ltr.
So for a block you put 3 stitches into what would have been the space; this replaces the chains and missed stitches and creates a "block" of 5 tall stitches: two that are part of the framework mesh of spaces and 3 that fill in the space.

Instructions

[Editors note:These are the instructions as given in the original - however they make a lot of assumptions about one's knowledge of the method, hence I have provided more in the way of explanation above.]

The curtain is commenced at the top.
Start with 377 chain.
Foundation row: 1 ltr into 6th chain from hook, 4 more ltr for the first block, 91 spaces, 1 blk, 4 chain, turn.

[Editors note:I feel I have to explain this row:
1 ltr into 6th chain from hook and then 4 ltr makes an effective block of 5 where the 5 chain count as your first ltr; this uses 9 of the 377 chains;
next you make your first space with 3 chain, miss 3 stitches and make a ltr into the next stitch; this uses 4 more of the foundation chains;
then you repeat the space a further 90 times which uses 360 more of the foundation chains.
So you have used 9+4+360=373 chains, and this leaves you with the final 4 chain for your last 4 ltr.
Note that you finish a space with an ltr and then make 4 ltr which means you finish with a block of 5. You then make 4 chain to count as an ltr for the start of the next row.
]

Repeat this row 7 times more.

Start pattern:

9th row (1st row of pattern): 1 blk, 6 sp, 1 blk, 1 sp, 1 blk, 1 sp, 1 blk, 2 sp, 1 blk, 2 sp, 1 blk, 1 sp, 1 blk, 53 sp, 1 blk, 1 sp, 1 blk, 2 sp, 1 blk, 2 sp, 1 blk, 1 sp, 1 blk, 1 sp, 1 blk, 6 sp, 1 blk.

Now proceed from the 10th row of the chart, that is, the 2nd pattern row.

Materials

Coats Chain Mercer Crochet No 60:
4½ balls are required for a curtain approximately 40 inches long,
and 5½ balls for a 47 inch length.

Milwards steel crochet hook No 5½.

Tension

5 spaces to 1 inch

Size matters

Length as required.
Width: 18½ inches.
[Editors note:Make sure you check this out if you decide to change the thread and hook sizes.

Crochet abbreviations:

ch: chain
ss: slip stitch
sp: space - work 3 ch, miss 3 sts, work 1 ltr into next st.
blk: block - work 4 ltr into the next 4 sts.
ltr: "long treble" - a double or triple treble.

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet; htr is equivalent to US double crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

You can access a larger version of the chart - right click on the icon below and choose "save link as" or "save target as" (browser dependent options) to download and save a pdf file.

Repeat the pattern for the required length, making allowance for the hem and finishing with a row of ltr.

To Make Up

Turn over the hem at the 6th row of the plain mesh and stitch to the
bottom of the 4th row of pattern; then stitch along the 2nd row from the top of hem to form a heading.

Press the curtains using a warm iron over a damp cloth.

Floral Spray

FlowerSpray.jpg

This is a little addendum to the next two crochet curtain patterns providing the theme for this month. If you want to see the other patterns then search for "curtains" using the box in the side bar.
But — if you want to crochet a little something, and the mere thought of making a pair of curtains gives you a headache, then try this little bonus pattern for a flower spray. Again it asks for really tiny hook and lace cottons - but being a flower, you can freely adapt the materials and hook and make it come out any size you like.

Double Double Crochet

Dbl dc is not a stitch I had come across before, but here it is. I think it makes a rather pretty stitch.

To work a dbl dc insert the hook into the stitch and pull thread through. Then thread over hook, and pull through one loop on hook; then thread over hook, and pull through remaining 2 loops.


Petal

Commence with 13 chain.

1st row: dbl dc into 3rd ch from hook; 1 dbl dc into each of the remaining ch, 2 ch; turn.
(2 ch stands for first dbl dc of next row.
2nd row: 1 dbl dc into each dbl dc; 2 ch; turn.

Repeat the 2nd row 6 times more.

9th row: Decrease 1 stitch at the beginning and end of the row; 2 ch, turn.
(To decrease: insert hook into st, thread over hook and pull through, insert hook into next stitch and pull thread through, thread over and pull through 2 loops, thread over and pull through remaining 2 loops).
10th row: 1 dbl dc into each dbl dc; 2 ch; turn.
Repeat 9th and 10th rows 3 times more.

Fasten off.


Edging

1st row: Join thread into the dbl dc of 1st row-end, * 5 ch, miss 1 row-end, 1 dc into next row-end. Repeat from * 6 times more;
5 ch; 1 dc into 3rd dbl dc of last row of petal.
Work down other side to correspond; turn.

2nd row: 6 dc into each loop of 5 ch.
Fasten off.

Make 5 more petals.


Centre.

Commence with 6 ch, join with a slip stitch.

1st row: Into ring work 11 dc, join with a ss.
2nd row: 2 dc into each dc, 1 ss. into first dc.
3rd row: * 5 ch, miss 1 dc; 1 dc into next dc; repeat from * ending with 5 ch, miss 1 dc, 1 ss into same place as last ss.
4th row: Into each 5 ch loop work 5 dc.

Fasten off.


To Make Up.

Sew petals together at base.
Sew centre into position.

Make another flower the same, and sew on to a piece of fine wire.

Materials

Coats Chain Mercer Crochet No 60

Milwards steel crochet hook No 5.
[Editors note: This is going to be a teeny tiny steel hook of the type used in lace making — equivalent to about ½mm. You can read about imperial hook sizes using the link in the side bar.]

Piece of fine wire.

Tension

12 rows to 1 inch
[Editors note: Obviously depends on your choice of thread and hook.]

Size matters

The flower is about 3¼ inches from tip to tip.
The petal is 1½ inches.
[Editors note: Or whatever size you make it using your choice of thread and hook.]

Crochet abbreviations:

ch: chain
ss: slip stitch
sp: space — work 3 ch, miss 3 sts, work 1 ltr into next stitch.
dc: double crochet.
dbl dc: "double double crochet" — explanation in the instructions.

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet; htr is equivalent to US double crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

© Christina Coutts 2007

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