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April 2021

Made for Each Other - sweater or slipover for Spring

MadeForEachOther.jpg

Sweater in Spring colours with sleeveless option suitable for the changing season.
Currently for me, the appeal of this combination is the yellow and grey colour scheme in which they have illustrated it - although I would be disinclined to set it off with a bright all-yellow ensemble, and would probably use a more muted shade of yellow.

Instructions.

Instructions are given for 3 sizes - larger sizes given in brackets up to a 40 inch chest. The design is intended for women or men (albeit men of presumably modest proportions).

Back

With No 11 needles, and main shade (M) cast on 108 (118 : 126) stitches, and work 5 inches in k2/p2 rib, beginning the second row "p2" for second and third sizes, and increasing 1 stitch at the end of the last row for all sizes.
[109 (119 : 127) sts]

Change to No 9 needles and work Fair-Isle from Chart thus:

For 1st and 3rd sizes, repeat the 18 stitches between the red lines to the last the last stitch then work the 1st stitch beyond the line.

For 2nd size, work 5 stitches before the red line, then repeat the 18
stitches between the red lines to the last 6 stitches, then work 6 stitches beyond the red line.

Continue until work measures 12 (13 : 14) inches for the sweater with sleeves, or 13 (14 : 15) inches for the sleeveless slipover, ending with a
wrong-side row.

Armholes shaping:

Cast off 4 stitches at the beginning of the next 2 rows, and then 3 stitches at the beginning of the following 2 rows.

Decrease 1 stitch at each end of the next 4 rows, then decrease 1 stitch at the beginning of every row until 77 (85 : 91) stitches remain.

Continue straight until work measures 21 (22½ : 24) inches.

Shoulder shaping:

Cast off 5 stitches at the beginning of the next 6 rows, and then 5 (7 : 9) stitches at the beginning of the following 2 rows.

Cast off 37 (41 : 43) stitches.

Front

Work as for the Back until work measures 11 (11¾ : 12) inches for the sweater with sleeves or 12 (12¾ : 13½) inches for the slipover.

Front shaping:
Next row: pattern 54 (59 : 63) stitches; turn.

Continue on these stitches only.

Decrease 1 stitch at the beginning of the next and ever following 4th row until work measures 12 (13 : 14) inches for the sweater with sleeves or 13 (14 : 15) inches for the slipover, ending at the side edge.

Armholes shaping:
Still decreasing at the centre front edge on every 4th row as before, cast off 4 stitches at the beginning of the next row, and then 3 stitches at the beginning of the following alternate row.

Decrease 1 stitch at the armhole edge on the next 4 rows, then decrease 1 stitch at the beginning of the next 5 (6 : 7) alternate rows.

Continue with centre front edge shaping until until 20 (22 : 24) stitches remain.

Continue straight until work measures 21 (22½ : 24) inches, ending at the side edge.

Shoulder shaping:

Cast off 5 stitches at the beginning of the next, and following 2 alternate rows. Work 1 row. Cast off 5 (7 : 9) stitches and break yarn.

With right side facing, slip the centre front stitch on to a safety pin.
Join yarn to inner edge of the the remaining stitches and complete the other side of the front to match, reversing shapings.

Sleeves

With No 11 needles and main shade, cast on 56 (66 : 74) stitches and work 3½ inches in k2/p2 rib, as for the Back,and decreasing 1 stitch at the beginning of the last row for all sizes.
[55 (65 : 73) sts]

Change to No 9 needles and working from the Chart as for the Back, increase 1 stitch at each end of every 10th row until there are 75 (83 : 89),stitches.
Continue straight until work measures 17 (17½ : 18) inches, ending with a wrong side row.

To shape the top cast off 4 stitches at the beginning of the next 2 rows.
Decrease 1 stitch at the beginning of every row until 43 (49 : 53) stitches remain, then decrease 1 stitch at each end of the next 6 (8 : 10) rows.
Cast off 3 stitches at the beginning of the next 6 rows.
Cast off.

Neckband:

Join right shoulder seam.

With right side facing, using No 12 needles and main shade, pick up and knit 64 (68 : 72) stitches down left side of neck, increase in the stitch from the safety pin, pick up and knit 64 (68 : 72) stitches up right side of neck, and then knit 36 (40 : 44) stitches from the Back neck.

1st row wrong side facing): * p2, k2; repeat from * to last 2 stitches, p2.

Decreasing 1 stitch each side of the centre front 2 stitches on every row, rib 9 more rows as set.
Cast off ribwise.

Join left shoulder and neckband seam.

Armbands for Slipover:

With right side facing, using No 11 needles and main shade, pick up and knit 118 (130 : 142) stitches round each armhole.
Work 9 rows in k2, p2 rib beginning the second row "p2".

Cast off ribwise.

Making Up

Press work lightly on wrong side, omitting welts.

Sweater with sleeves: Set in sleeves. Join side and sleeve seams.
Slipover: Join side and armband seams.

Materials

Double Knitting yarn in 25g balls:
Sweater:
9 (11 : 12) main colour (charcoal);
7 (7 : 8) in white;
5 balls in light grey for all sizes.
Slipover:
7 (8 : 11) main colour (white);
5 in contrast charcoal all sizes;
3 (3 : 4) in contrast yellow.

A pair each No 9 (3¾mm) and No 11 (3mm) needles

Tension

24 sts and 32 rows to 4 inches measured over pattern on No 9 needles

Size matters

To fit chest 34 (37 : 40) inches; length from top of shoulders: 21 (22½ : 24) inches; sleeve seam: 17 (17½ : 18) inches.

Abbreviations

increase: increase 1 stitch by knitting twice into the next stitch.

decrease: decrease 1 stitch by knitting two stitches together.

k2tog or p2tog: work 2 sts together to decrease.

A word on the wool

The original yarn was Robin Vogue DK which was 90% wool. It appeared as both 25g and 1 oz balls depending on the era, and may have been pure wool at one time.

Some information indicates a yardage of 112m for 50g.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

Chart

Note: When working the colour pattern from the chart, strand the yarns loosely across the back of the work over not more than 3 stitches at a time, to keep the fabric elastic.

MadeForEachOtherChart.gif

March 2021

Adaptable design... (for a "modern" chair)

ChairCover8

This is a needlepoint design with instructions below. However, needlepoint charts can be used for colourwork in knitting, so I also discuss the possibility of adapting it to use for a "modern" cushion cover.

This chair on which the cover is shown seems far from modern for the 1950s when this pattern was published, but this might have been a way to try an update it. They reassure us: "you can extend this design as required to fit any chair or stool top; with careful colour choosing the pattern would suit period pieces as well as modern furniture". This particular chair seems very similar to my Mother's dining set purchased in 1938, where the seat is wider at the front that the back (so not quite square), but the chair's construction seems a bit more solid, so it is probably a little older.
Sadly, his type of brown furniture is even less popular today than it was when this was first published - but upcycling with chalk paint and a colourful fabric is always a possibility.

Needlepoint embroidery instructions.

As I said in the introduction - these are the instructions for needlepoint, with notes on using the chart for a knitted cushion at the end.

Make a paper pattern of seat, and draw round the outline, centring the pattern, on the canvas. Mark the centre line in each direction and start the diamond pattern on the centre point.
Each square of the chart equals 1 stitch and an exact repeat of pattern is shown on the chart. Extend the design outwards all round to the pencil outline.

The main design is worked in tent-stitch (a slanting-stitch over one
intersection on the right side and two double threads at the back; work each stitch in two separate movements, down and up); all brown stitches (leaves, stalks and single stitch in centre of small lime motifs) are in single cross-stitch.

Press, stretch and mount finished tapestry as required.

Mounting Tapestry

Before mounting your work, press it carefully on wrong side under a lightly damped cloth. If, through not working in a frame, the tapestry has got out of shape, pin out face downwards on a clean cloth, stretching it to the correct shape; press the wrong side carefully under a damp cloth, and leave pinned out for 24 hours.
This should help, and you can correct any further distortion by stretching the work well as you mount it.

To mount, lay the tapestry flat, wrong side up, then place the seat pad on top. Bring tapestry up sides of padded cushion part and fix temporarily with lots of ordinary sewing pins, turning to the front again and again to check the correct positioning of the design.

When it is firmly held with pins all round, fold the surplus edges of the canvas over the wooden frame of the pad, and nail firmly in position with tacks and a hammer, or use a staple gun, mitreing the corners as neatly as possible.
Remove the sewing pins and cover the underside of the pad with the usual utility furnishing material.


Charted cushion adaptation.

You can easily use an embroidery chart as a colourwork chart for knitting.
And you do not have to adapt it - but there is one snag. Unlike cross-stitch embroidery, a knitted stitch is not square - so your resulting knitted cushion will not be square and the geometric pattern will be distorted.
Now if you want to design your own pattern charts, and take account of the shape of the stitches, you can use "knitter's graph paper" - a link to free graph paper charts is at the top of the right-hand side bar, and you can choose your tension and print the paper yourself. There is a great tutorial at The Twisted Yarn.
You could use this to try and adapt this pattern but trying to make perfect square shapes can be a bit tricky - and I have not tried to do so.
[Editors note: Another way to make stitches more or less symmetrical is to work in garter stitch - you would need to work every row twice to make this work.

So here is the chart in some nice shades of yellow and grey.

Assuming you are familiar with the idea of working from charts, as usual, the charts show the right, or knitted, side of the work, reading knit rows from right to left; every alternate row worked in purl and read from left to right. The yarn not in use is carried loosely across the back of the fabric all the time, so it will be taken behind the stitches on a knitted row and in front of them on a purled row.

Ideally you need to keep within a maximum of about five or six stitches in each colour so that you don't have to carry the yarn not in use across too many stitches at the back of the work. It is feasible to carry the yarn across a greater number of stitches as long as you don't pull the yarn so tightly that it puckers your work.
[Editors note: When you are making actual garments with motifs, it is not good practice to leave large loops of yarn at the back as they tend to catch on buttons etc as you pull sweaters on and off (ask me how I know). With cushions like this it is less important as the wrong side of the work is enclosed and unlikely to be pulled once finished.]

Finally - here's a roughly square cushion made up of 3 x 4 distorted motifs showing what it might actually look like:

Making up

For a cushion you need two identical pieces. You could make two knitted pattern pieces, or make one of them in plain knitting, or back the cushion with fabric, cut to the right size (don't forget to allow extra on the fabric to turn in the raw edges).
Sew the two cushion pieces together on three sides.
Insert a cushion pad and sew up the fourth side.

The size (and shape) of the resulting cushion cover will depend on the yarn you choose to work with. For a standard double knitting yarn, a 3 x 4 motif should work out to a size of about 22 inches wide and x 23 inches high.

Materials

Tapestry canvas about 23 inches square for a 17 inch square pad. This would be about ⅝ of a yard, or about 60 cm of an appropriate width.
[Editors note: Choose a canvas appropriate for the wool you are using (I know - sounds obvious). Most tapestry wools are design for a thread count of between 10 and 14.

The quantities given for tapestry wool skeins of 15 yards each:
11 Dark Brown
9 Rust
8 Grey
1 Lime

Size Matters

Designed to cover an "average" chair at 17 inches square.

Tension

Most tapestry wools are design for a thread count of between 10 and 14; This design appears to be for a count of about 10, using the picture as a guide.

A Word on the Wool

This design is made using Beehive tapestry canvas No 702, and Beehive tapestry wool.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

February 2021

Spring Outlook

SpringOutlook

Man's sweater with a textured pattern, made in two colours intended to blend with each other. The overall tweedy look makes this colour scheme look a little autumnal - perhaps the acid green combined with grey or a different shade of green might be more redolent of Spring.
I think the cropping of the picture is an illustration of "never let knitting get in the way of a good photo".

Instructions.

Sweater is worked in stripes of the two colours using a textured moss stitch. Instructions are given for 3 sizes.

Back and Front alike

With No 9 needles and main shade (M), cast on 104/108/112 stitches, and work 3 inches in k1/p1 rib, increasing 7/9/11 stitches evenly across the last row.
[111 / 117 / 123 sts]

With right side facing, change to No 7 needles and work in pattern as follows:
Do not break off colour M, and join in contrast (C).
1st row, using C (right side facing): Knit in contrast colour (C).
2nd row, using C: Knit in C.
Do not break off C, but pick up M again.
3rd row, using M: k1, * p1, k1; repeat from * to end.
4th row, using M: p1, * k1, p1; repeat from * to end.
Do not break off M, but pick up C again ready for the next row.

These 4 rows form the pattern.
Continue straight in the pattern until work measures 16 inches, ending with the second row of the pattern.

With right side facing, shape armholes by casting off 4 stitches at the beginning of the next 2 rows, then decrease 1 stitch at each end of the next and every alternate row until 91 / 95 / 99 stitches remain.

Continue straight in pattern until back measures 25 / 25½ / 25½ inches, ending with 4th pattern row.
Break off contrast C.

With right side facing continue in M and shape neck:
Next row: Rib 29 / 30 / 31, turn, and leave remaining stitches on a spare needle or stitch holder.
Next row: Rib to end
Next row: Rib 27 / 28 / 29, rib 2 stitches together.
Next row: Rib 2 stitches together, rib to end.
Next row: Cast off 7 / 8 / 9 in rib, rib to last 2 stitches, rib 2 stitches together.
Next row: Rib 2 stitches together, rib to end.
Next row: Cast off 8 / 8 / 8 in rib, rib to last 2 stitches, rib 2 stitches together.
Next row: Rib 2 stitches together, rib to end.
Cast off remaining 8 / 8 / 8 stitches in rib.

With right side facing, slip the centre 33 / 35 / 37 stitches on a spare needle or stitch holder.
Rejoin M wool to last 29 / 30 / 31 stitches, rib to end.
Finish to correspond with first side.

Sleeves

With No 10 needles and main shade (M), cast on 50 / 52 / 52 stitches, and work 3 inches in k1/p1 rib, increasing 7 stitches evenly across the last row.
[50 / 59 / 59 sts]

With right side facing, change to No 7 needles, join in C and continue in pattern, shaping sides by increasing 1 stitch at each end of the 9th and every following 8th row until there are 79 / 83 / 83 stitches, taking the increased stitches into the pattern as they are made.

Continue straight in pattern until sleeve seam measures 18½ / 18½ / 19 inches, ending with 2nd pattern row.

With right side facing, keeping pattern correct, shape top by casting off 4 stitches at the beginning of the next 2 rows, then decrease 1 stitch at each end of the next and every alternate row until 37 / 39 / 39 stitches remain.
Pattern back.
Now decrease 1 stitch at each end of every row until 21 / 21 / 21 stitches remain.
Cast off.

Neck Ribbing - back and front alike.

With No 9 needles, main shade M, and right side facing, start at shoulder edge and pick up and knit, 8 / 8 / 8 stitches down side of neck, rib 33 / 35 / 37 stitches from spare needle or stitch holder, pick up and knit 8 / 8 / 8 stitches up other side of neck.
[49 / 51 / 53 sts]

Work 3 rows in rib over all stitches, decreasing 1 stitch at each end of the next and following alternate row.

Cast off evenly in rib.

To Make Up

Press work lightly on wrong side under a damp cloth, avoiding ribbing.
Join shoulder seams.
Join neck with a flat seam.
Join side and sleeve seams; insert sleeves.
Press all seams.

Materials

Aran or worsted weight yarn:
16/17/18 x 1oz balls in darker main shade(M);
12/13/13 oz in contrast "cool lime"(C).

Pair each of No 7 (4½mm), No 9 (3¾mm), and No 10 (3¼mm) needles.
Spare needle or stitch holder.

Tension

20sts and 25 rows to four inches on 4½mm needles over stocking stitch.

Size matters

To fit chest:
37-38/39-40/41-42 inches;
length from top of shoulders: 25½/26/26 inches;
sleeve seam:
18½/18½/19 inches.

Abbreviations

k: knit
p: purl
M: main dark colour
C: contrast lighter colour

A word on the wool.

The original yarn was Patons Flair - one of those "tripleknit" yarns which never caught on so much in the UK. More or less Aran or American worsted weight . As usual no clues as to the yardage, but it was 60% wool, 40% courtelle (acrylic).

Note that later on Patons made "Flair DK" in 20g balls and with a slightly different wool blend.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

SpringOutlook-detail

© Christina Coutts 2007

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