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Wednesday January 31, 2018

Books in January

  • Learning to Talk by Hilary Mantel [Read by Patrick Moy, Anna Bentinck, and Jane Collingwood] BOM-DrFinlaysCasebook.jpg
    A collection of autobiographically inspired short stories. Poignant and evocative tales of life in the 1950s and 60s.
    • King Billy is aGentleman
    • Curved is the Line of Beauty
    • Learning to Talk
    • Third Floor Rising
    • The Clean Slate

  • Behind the Scenes at the Museum by Kate Atkinson [read by Diana Quick]BOM-BehindTheScenesAtTheMuseum.jpg
    Another wonderful chronicle of an extended family. It covers not only the main character's childhood era (1950s) but also the previous generations across two world wars.
    I was originally given her book of short stories, and due to the cover (!) thought she was a chick lit writer. Then I was introduced to her Jackson Brodie novels (and TV series) - and thought she was a crime writer.
    Now - I have thankfully stopped trying to pigeon-hole her and just see her as the excellent writer she undoubtedly is.

  • The Labyrinth of Osiris and The Lost Army of Cambyses by Paul Sussman
    [read by Gordon Griffin]
    BOM-TheLostArmyOfCambyses.jpg BOM-TheLabyrinthOfOsiris.jpg Quite by chance I listened to The Labyrinth of Osiris and was completely hooked. I thought I had found a great new author - only to discover the poor chap was the victim of an untimely death - so 3 books is it (actually there are a couple more but not in this "series").
    I have read them in exactly reverse order - and I think his style (as in: a writer of thrillers - Sussman was a journalist of some standing) improved over the 3 books.
    The books are variously described with comparisons to Dan Brown - which is frankly an insult but I guess gives you a flavour of the content. They are police procedurals set in present day Egypt and Israel but with (in truth unrealistic but made real) new archaeological finds based on references in ancient writings. Sussman has combined his love for archaeology with his day job and produced some great stories.
    Curses that there are no more.

Posted by Christina at 4:11 PM. Category: Books of the Month

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