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January 2014

Stormcheater

Stormcheater.jpg

Another scarf/hood combination from the 1940s that is the partner of last year's pattern. It has a firm headband to frame the face, and a pocket construction at the back (see photo below) to keep that forties hairdo in good shape. The scarf ties are double thickness.

The Back with elastic casing:

Cast on 300 stitches
1st row: Slip 1, knit to end of row.
2nd row: Slip 1, purl to the last stitch k1.
3rd row: K3tog, knit to the last 3sts k3tog.
4th row: K2tog, purl to the last 2sts k2tog.

Repeat the 3rd and 4th rows until 108sts remain.
Proceed as follows:
1st row: Slip 1, knit to end of row.
2nd row: Slip 1, purl to the last stitch k1.
3rd row: Slip 1, k1, * wool to front, slip 1 purlways, wool to back, k1; repeat from * to end of row.

Repeat the 3rd row 4 times.
8th row: Slip 1, k2tog, wfd;* k1, wool to front, slip 1 purlways, wool to back; repeat from * to the last 3sts; kl, wfd k2tog.

Repeat the 3rd Row 3 times.

12th row: Slip 1, purl to the last stitch k1.
Cast off.

The Head Piece:

Cast on 300 stitches
1st row: Slip 1, knit to end of row.
2nd row: Slip 1, purl to the last stitch k1.
3rd row: K3tog, knit to the last 3sts k3tog.
4th row: K2tog, purl to the last 2sts k2tog.

Repeat the 3rd and 4th rows until 108sts remain.
Proceed as follows:

1st row: K2tog, knit to the last 2sts k2tog.
2nd row: K2tog, purl to the last 2sts k2tog.

Repeat the 1st and 2nd rows until 68sts remain.
Cast off.

The Border:

Cast on 120sts.
1st row: Slip 1, knit to end of row.
2nd row: Slip 1, purl to the last stitch k1.
Repeat the 1st and 2nd rows 11 times; the 2nd row twice; then the 1st and 2nd rows 12 times.
Cast off.

To Make Up the Stormcheater

Press each piece separately on the wrong side under a damp cloth.
Sew the cast on edge of the back to the cast on edge of the head piece.
Commencing at this seam, sew the shaped side edges together for 14½ inches.
Fold back the cast on edge of the border to the centre (the knit row on the wrong side of the work formed by the purl row on the right side of the work); place a roll of cotton wool under this fold then sew the cast on edge to the last purl row before the knit row.
Fold back the cast off edge, pad with cotton wool to form a second roll and sew in position to correspond.
Place the open end of one padded rollover the other open end and sew both ends together.
Sew this end of the roll to the edge of the head piece opposite the elastic casing.
Sew the other ends of the padded rolls in the same manner and sew to the other side of the head piece opposite the elastic casing.
Sew the shaped edge of the head piece to the seam of the padded rolls.
Thread elastic through the casing on the back and sew in position at the ends.
Sew the edges of the elastic casing to the seam at the ends of the padded rolls.
Press all seams.

Materials

4 ozs 3ply wool.

One pair No 10 (3¼mm) knitting needles.

9½ inches elastic.
Cotton wool for padding.

Tension

Approx. 32sts to 4 inches on No 10 needles.

Size matters

To fit an average sized head.

Abbreviations

k2tog: (decrease) knit 2 sts together.
p2tog: (decrease) purl 2 sts together.
wfd: "wool forward": make a stitch by bringing the wool to the front of the work and then passing the yarn over the needle when you make the next stitch.

A word on the wool

Original knitted in Sirdar Majestic 3-ply Wool.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

January 2013

Fair-Isle Hooded Scarf

HoodedScarf3.jpg

A lovely warm idea that has never lost its popularity: a scarf/hood combination. This has an interesting construction with the scarf being double sided, and the hood being more a like a pocket with the intention that it should form soft folds when worn. [I'm more used to a pixie hood type design with a centre back seam].

Hood Scarf:

Using the main colour wool (MC) cast on 108 sts.

1st row: Slip 1, knit to end of row.
2nd row: Slip 1, purl to the last stitch k1.

Repeat the 1st and 2nd rows 9 times more.

** Join in the first contrast (B) and working the 1st and 2nd rows as shown on the chart proceed as follows:

1st row: * Knit 2MC, 3B, 3MC, 3B, 1MC, repeat from * to end of row. Break off first contrast (B) and join in the second contrast (Y).
2nd row: * Purl lY, 3MC, 3Y, 3MC, 2Y, repeat from * to end of row. Break off second contrast (Y).



Commencing with the 3rd, row proceed as shown on the chart, changing the colours when necessary, until the 15th row has been worked.
Break off contrast B.

1st row: Slip 1, purl to the last stitch k1.
2nd row: Slip 1, knit to end of row.
3rd row: Slip 1, purl to the last stitch k1.
**

Repeat from ** to ** twice.

Continue in stocking stitch until the work measures 40 inches
from the beginning, ending on the wrong side of the work.
Repeat from ** to ** 3 times.

Work 18 rows in stocking stitch.
Cast off.
Press on the wrong side under a damp cloth.
Fold the scarf in half lengthways. Sew up the seam for 16 inches, leave 16 inches open to form the hood, sew up the remainder of the seam.
[Editor's note: The scarf is a tube which you press flat to make a double thickness scarf, and the hood is formed by leaving the tube open, so the hood is single thickness.]

Hood Border:

Work a border along one 16 inch side of the hood opening as follows:
With the wrong side of the work facing, using the Main Colour wool and commencing 2 inches from the seam, pick up and knit 108 sts. evenly along the next 12 inches (ending 2 inches from the other seam).
[Editor's note: I know - it seems like you are knitting on the wrong side - but the border is folded back - so it's all OK.]

Next row (right side): Slip 1, purl to the last stitch k1.

Join in the second contrast B and working the 1st and 2nd rows as shown on the chart, proceed as follows:

1st row: * Knit 2MC, 3B, 3MC, 3B, 1MC, repeat from * to end of row. Break off first contrast (B) and join in the second contrast (Y).
2nd row: * Purl lY, 3MC, 3Y, 3MC, 2Y, repeat from * to end of row. Break off second contrast (Y).

Commencing with the 3rd row, proceed as shown on the chart, changing the colours when necessary, until the 15th row has been worked.
Break off first contrast (B)
Next row: Slip 1, purl to the last stitch k1.

Proceed as follows:
Next row: Slip 1, kl, * pl, k.l, repeat from * to end of row.
Repeat the this row once.
Cast off loosely in rib.

To Make Up the Scarf.

Sew the ends of the scarf together on the wrong side.
Place the corners of the border to the seam and sew the edges of the border to the 2-inch openings.
Turn back the border and catch-stitch in the centre to hold the border in position.
Using a No 12 Crochet Hook and main shade with the right side of the work facing, work 1 row of double crochet evenly along the other 16 inch side of the hood opening. Using the coloured wools make a mixed fringe at the ends of the scarf.
Press all seams.

Materials

5 ozs 3ply in main shade plus "medium-sized" balls in each of four contrast colours eg blue, yellow, green and pink.

One pair No 9 (3¾ mm) knitting needles.
One No. 12 (2½ mm) crochet hook.

Tension

Approx. 30sts to 4 inches on No 9 needles.

Size matters

Width round face edge is 16 inches.
Length of scarf (excluding fringe) is 48 inches.

A word on the wool

Original knitted in Sirdar Majestic 3-ply Wool

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

April 2011

Gloves for a Lady I

LadyGloves1.jpg

A very early pattern to make these charming light weight gloves using fine 2ply yarn. You could also use a mercerised cotton for summer gloves, but (as the pattern encourages) check your tension carefully.
Note that these glove patterns are very elderly and thus you have to make allowances in the instructions. They talk about "plain knitting" and they don't give a lot of explanation about how you turn the work and pick up the stitches. Generally they expect you to fend for yourself; I have not tested this pattern so if you would like to double check what I have written or if you want a second opinion I'm happy to try and help.

Instructions:

The gloves are worked in blackberry stitch (also known as trinity stitch) on 2 needles. The nature of this stitch means that the number of stitches can vary from row to row; this can seem a little puzzling as it means the instructions for the right and left hand gloves seem not to be symmetrical - but they should work out OK.

Right-hand Glove:

Using two Needles, cast on 54 sts.

1st row: k1, purl to last stitch, k1.
2nd row: k1, * p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch; repeat from * to last st, k1.
3rd row: k1, purl to last stitch, k1.
4th row: k1, * k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog; repeat from * to last st, k1.

These 4 rows form the basic pattern.

Repeat from 1st to 4th row five times.

The Thumb

Next row: k1, p32, k1. Turn
Next row: k1, (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) twice, p3tog, cast on 12 sts, turn.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: k1, p20, k1.
2nd row: k1; (k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog) five times; k1.
3rd row: k1, p20, k1.
4th row: k1; (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) five times; k1.

Repeat 1st to 4th row three times.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: k1, (k1, k2togtbl, k4, k2tog, k1) twice, k1.
2nd row: k1, p16, k1.
3rd row: k1, (k1, k2togtbl, k2, k2tog, k1) twice, k1.

Break off wool and run end through remaining sts.
Draw up and fasten off securely.


With wrong side facing, using the needle containing the remaining 22 sts, join in wool and knit up 12 sts from 12 cast-on sts at the base of the thumb; p19, k1 across remaining sts.
Commencing at 2nd row, repeat pattern on these 54 sts., until work measures 4 ins, from commencement, ending with 2nd row of pattern.

First Finger

Next row: k1, p34, increase once in next stitch. Turn.
Next row: k1, (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) four times, cast on 2sts. Turn.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: k1, p17, k1.
2nd row: k1; (k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog) four times; k1p1k1 in next stitch; k1.
3rd row: k1, p19, k1.
4th row: k1; (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) four times; p3tog; k1.

Repeat from 1st to 4th row four times, then 1st and 2nd rows once, decreasing one stitch in last row.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: (k1, k2togtbl, k4, k2tog, k1) twice.
2nd row: k1, p14, k1.
3rd row: (k1, k2togtbl, k2, k2tog, k1) twice,

Finish off as given for Thumb.

Second Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 4 sts. from 2 cast-on sts. at base of First Finger, p5, k1. Turn.

Next row: k1, (k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog) four times, cast on 4sts. Turn.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: k1, p19, k1.
2nd row: k1; (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) four times; p3tog; k1.
3rd row: k1, p17, k1.
4th row: k1; (k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog) four times; k1p1k1 in next stitch; k1.

Repeat from 1st to 4th row five times, then 1st and 2nd rows once, increasing one stitch in last row.
Decrease and finish off as given for First Finger.

Third Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 5sts. from 4 cast-on sts. at base of Second Finger, p5, increase in the next stitch. Turn.

Next row: k1, (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) three times, p3tog, p1; cast on 4sts. Turn.

Then work exactly as given for First Finger.

Fourth Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 4 sts. from 4 cast-on sts. at base of Third Finger, p5, k1.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: k1; (k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog) four times; k1.
2nd row: k1, p16, k1.
3rd row: k1; (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) four times; k1.
4th row: k1, p16, k1.

Repeat from 1st to 4th row three times, then 1st row once.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: (k1, k2togtbl, k3, k2tog, k1) twice.
2nd row: k1, p12, k1.
3rd row: (k1, k2togtbl, k1, k2tog, k1) twice.

Finish off as given for First Finger.

The Frill

With wrong side of work facing, pick up 52 sts, from cast-on edge of glove. Join in wool.

1st row: k1, * k2tog; repeat from * to last st, k1.

Work 3 rows in plain knitting.
[Editor's note: I think they may mean garter stitch here - every row knitted.]

5th row: k1, * increase once in next st, repeat from * to last st, k1. [There should now be 52 sts. on needle].
6th row: k1, * k2, p1, won, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.
7th row: k1, * p2, k2, repeat from* to last 3 sts, p2, k1.
8th row: k1, * k2, p2, won, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.
9th row: k1, * p2, k3, repeat from* to last 3 sts, p2, k1.
10th row: k1, * k2, p3, won, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.
11th row: k1, * p2, k4, repeat from* to last 3 sts, p2, k1.
12th row: k1, * k2, p4, won, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Continue in this manner until there are 164 sts. on needle.

Next row: k1, * p2, k8, repeat from* to last 3 sts, p2, k1.

Cast off knitways.

Left-hand Glove:

Using two Needles, cast on 54 sts.

Work exactly as given for Right-hand Glove until Thumb is reached.

The Thumb

Next row: k1, p31, cast on 11 sts. Turn.
Next row: k1; (k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog) five times; k1. Turn

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: k1, p20, k1.
2nd row: k1; (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) five times; k1.
3rd row: k1, p20, k1.
4th row: k1; (k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog) five times; k1.

Repeat 1st to 4th row three times.

Decrease and finish off as given for the Thumb of Right-hand Glove.

Using needle containing 21 sts, join in wool and knit up 11 stitches from 11 cast-on sts, at the base of the thumb; p21, k1 across remaining stitches.

Continue in pattern on these 54 sts until wont measures 4 ins from commencement, ending with 2nd row of pattern.

First Finger

Next row: k1, p35, cast on 5 sts. Turn.
Next row: k1, (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) four times, p3tog, k1. Turn.

Then work exactly is given for First Finger of of Right-hand Glove.

Second Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 4 sts. from 5 cast-on sts. at base of First Finger, p5, cast on 4sts. Turn.

Next row: k1, (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) four times, p3tog; k1. Turn.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: k1, p17, k1.
2nd row: k1; (k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog) four times; k1p1k1 in next stitch; k1.
3rd row: k1, p19, k1.
4th row: k1; (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) four times; p3tog; k1.

Repeat from 1st to 4th row five times, then 1st and 2nd rows once, decreasing one stitch at the end of the last row.
Decrease and finish off as given for First Finger of Right-hand Glove.

Third Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 5sts. from 4 cast-on sts. at base of Second Finger, p6, cast on 3sts. Turn.

Next row: k1, (k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog) four times, k1p1k1 in next stitch; k1. Turn.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: k1, p19, k1.
2nd row: k1; (p3tog; k1p1k1 in next stitch) four times; p3tog; k1.
3rd row: k1, p17, k1.
4th row: k1; (k1p1k1 in next stitch; p3tog) four times; k1p1k1 in next stitch; k1.

Repeat from 1st to 4th row four times, then 1st and 2nd rows once, increasing one stitch in last row.
Decrease and finish off as given for First Finger of Right-hand Glove.

Fourth Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 4 sts. from 3 cast-on sts. at base of Third Finger, p6, k1.

Then work exactly as given for Fourth Finger of Right-hand Glove.

Work the Frill as given for Right-hand Glove.

Making Up:

With a damp cloth and hot iron press very lightly.
Sew up Thumb, Finger and Side seams, by sewing together corresponding ridges (formed by the stitch knitted at each end of every row).

Materials

1 oz Patons Beehive Fingering 2ply.

One pair of No 12 (2¾ mm) needles.

Tension

3 patterns (12 sts) to 1 inch. Adjust your needle size to obtain the right tension.

Approximately 36sts 4 inches on No 12 needles over stocking stitch.

Size matters

Width all round above thumb, 5½ ins.
Length from frill to tip of middle finger 8½ ins.

[Editor's note: 5½ins seems a bit small? You may find that despite my notes on the wool weight below that you could use a "4ply" yarn with a larger gauge and/or adjust the needles to get the fit you need. Measure your hand and do a swatch....always Good Advice!]

Abbreviations

won: wool over needle. Makes an extra stitch which forms a small pattern hole when knitted on the next row.

p3tog: purl 3 stitches together (decrease 2)

k1p1k1: knit and purl into front, then knit into back of next stitch (increase 2)

k2tog: knit 2 stitches together (decrease).

k2togtbl: knit 2 stitches together through back loops or "ssk" (slip slip knit) is a method of knitting 2 stitches together but into the backs of the stitches rather than the usual "k2tog" which knits into the fronts.

A word on the wool

Although it may be a literal 2ply, I think the stated tension implies it is more like a 3 ply weight.

Throughout this site I state that it's hard to get 3ply yarns these days - and now I find Jamieson's have a different web address (now corrected on my links I hope) and a range of yarns that is new to me.

The yarns are properly described as to the number of strands plied together, (eg "2ply jumper weight"), but also helpfully tell you what the wool weight is equivalent to.

So they have an excellent range of colours in "2ply laceweight" which states: This yarn can be used in vintage patterns which call for "3ply yarns". I really wish I had discovered this for some of my other projects.

They also have a "cobweb lace" which might be a traditional 2 ply weight.

I can't wait to experiment.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist

LadyGloves1.jpg

Gloves for a Lady II

LadyGloves2.jpg

From the same early pattern source as Gloves for a Lady I - slightly less lacy but still an open-work light weight design using fine yarn.
Note that these glove patterns are very elderly and thus you have to make allowances in the instructions. They talk about "plain knitting" and they don't give a lot of explanation about how you turn the work and pick up the stitches. Generally they expect you to fend for yourself; I have not tested this pattern so if you would like to double check what I have written or if you want a second opinion I'm happy to try and help.

Instructions:

The gloves are worked in an openwork ladder stitch created by working "yarn over needle" or eyelets on every row.
It reminds me of string-vest patterns from the 1960s (very healthy) - but don't let that put you off...

Right-hand Glove:

Using two Needles, cast on 80 sts

Work 2 rows in plain knitting.
3rd row: k1, * p1, won, k2tog; repeat from * to last st, k1.
Repeat this row five times.
9th row: * k15, k2tog, k3tog; repeat from * to end of row.
Work 3 rows in plain knitting.
Repeat 3rd row six times.
19th row: * k12, k2tog, k3tog; repeat from * to end of row.
Work 3 rows in plain knitting.
Repeat 3rd row six times.
29th row: k2, p1, k1, p1, k2tog, * (p1, k1) twice, p1, k2tog; repeat from * to end of row.
30th row: k2, * p1, k1; repeat from * to end of row.

Repeat 30th row 6 times, increasing 2 sts in last row.

Repeat 3rd row thirty-two times.

The Thumb

Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) eleven times; k1. Turn
Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) three times; k1; cast on 10 sts loosely. Turn.

Working on these 20 sts, repeat 3rd row twenty-two times (length of
Thumb and Fingers may be varied to suit individual requirements).

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: knit plain.
2nd row: k1, purl to the last stitch, k1.
3rd row: (k3, k2tog, k2togtbl, k3) twice.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: (k2, k2tog, k2togtbl, k2) twice.

Break off wool and run end through remaining stitches.
Draw up and fasten off securely.


With right side facing, using the needle containing the remaining 25 sts, join in wool and knit up 10 sts from 10 cast-on sts at the base of the Thumb; wfwd, k2tog, (p1, won, k2 tog) four times, k1, across remaining 15 stitches.

Working on these 50 sts, repeat 3rd row of main pattern twenty-five times.

First Finger

Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) ten times; k1. Turn
Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) four times; p1, cast on 3 sts. Turn.

Working on these 17 sts, repeat 3rd row of main pattern twenty-five times.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: k14, k2tog, k1.
2nd row: k1, purl to the last stitch, k1.
3rd row: (k1, k2togtbl, k3, k2tog) twice.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: (k1, k2togtbl, k1, k2tog) twice.

Break off wool and run end through remaining stitches.
Draw up and fasten off securely.

Second Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 3 sts from 3 cast-on sts at base of First Finger, k2tog, p1, won, k2tog, k1. Turn.

Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) four times, p1, cast on 3sts. Turn.

Working on these 17 sts, repeat 3rd row of main pattern thirty times. Decrease and finish off as given for First Finger.

Third Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 3 sts from 3 cast-on sts at base of Second Finger, k2tog, p1, won, k2tog, k1. Turn.

Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) four times, p1, cast on 3sts. Turn.

Working on these 17 sts, repeat 3rd row of main pattern twenty-eight times. Decrease and finish off as given for First Finger.

Fourth Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 3 sts from 3 cast-on sts at base of Third Finger, k2tog, p1, won, k2tog, k1. Turn.

Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) four times, k1, cast on 3sts. Turn.

Working on these 14 sts, repeat 3rd row of main pattern eighteen times.

Then proceed as follows:-

1st row: knit plain.
2nd row: k1, purl to the last stitch, k1.
3rd row: (k1, k2togtbl, k2, k2tog) twice.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: (k1, k2togtbl, k2tog) twice.

Finish off as given for First Finger.

Left-hand Glove:

Cast on 80 sts and work exactly as given for Right-hand Glove until Thumb is reached.

The Thumb

Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) eight times, p1, cast on 9 sts. Turn.
Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) six times, k1. Turn.

Work on these 20 sts exactly as given for Thumb of Right-hand Glove.

Using needle containing 15sts, join in wool and knit up 11 stitches from 9 cast-on sts, at the base of the thumb; wfwd, k2tog, (p1,won, k2tog) 7 times, k1, across remaining 24 sts.

Working on these 50 sts, repeat 3rd row of main pattern twenty-five times.

First Finger

Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) ten times; p1, cast on 3 sts. Turn
Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) five times; k1, Turn.

Then work on these 17 sts, exactly is given for First Finger of Right-hand Glove.

Second Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 3sts from 3 cast-on sts at base of First Finger; k2tog, p1, won, k2tog, p1, cast on 3sts. Turn.

Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) five times; k1, Turn.

Then work on these 17 sts, exactly is given for Second Finger of Right-hand Glove.

Third Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 3sts from 3 cast-on sts at base of Second Finger; k2tog, p1, won, k2tog, p1, cast on 3sts. Turn.

Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) five times; k1, Turn.

Then work on these 17 sts, exactly is given for Third Finger of Right-hand Glove.

Fourth Finger

With right side of work facing, join in wool and knit up 3sts from 3 cast-on sts at base of Third Finger; k2tog, p1, won, k2tog, k1. Turn.

Next row: k1, (p1, won, k2tog) four times; k1, Turn.

Then work on these 14 sts, exactly is given for Fourth Finger of Right-hand Glove.

Work the Frill as given for Right-hand Glove.

Making Up:

With a damp cloth and hot iron press very lightly.
Sew up Thumb, Finger and Side seams, by sewing together corresponding ridges (formed by the stitch knitted at each end of every row).

Materials

1 oz Patons Beehive Fingering 2ply.

One pair of No 13 (2¼ mm) needles.

Tension

10 sts to 1 inch over pattern (not stretched).
Adjust your needle size to obtain the right tension.

Approximately 36sts 4 inches on No 12 needles over stocking stitch.

Size matters

Width all round above thumb, 5 ins.
Length from frill to tip of middle finger 9 ins.

[Editor's note: 5ins seems a bit small? You may find that despite my notes on the wool weight below that you could use a "4ply" yarn with a larger gauge and/or adjust the needles to get the fit you need. Measure your hand and do a swatch....always Good Advice!]

Abbreviations

won/wfwd: wool over needle/wool forward. Makes an extra stitch which forms a small pattern hole when knitted on the next row.

k2tog: knit 2 stitches together (decrease).

k2togtbl: knit 2 stitches together through back loops or "ssk" (slip slip knit) is a method of knitting 2 stitches together but into the backs of the stitches rather than the usual "k2tog" which knits into the fronts.

A word on the wool

Although it may be a literal 2ply, I think the stated tension implies it is more like a 3 ply weight.

Throughout this site I state that it's hard to get 3ply yarns these days - and now I find Jamieson's have a different web address (now corrected on my links I hope) and a range of yarns that is new to me.

The yarns are properly described as to the number of strands plied together, (eg "2ply jumper weight"), but also helpfully tell you what the wool weight is equivalent to.

So they have an excellent range of colours in "2ply laceweight" which states: This yarn can be used in vintage patterns which call for "3ply yarns". I really wish I had discovered this for some of my other projects.

They also have a "cobweb lace" which might be a traditional 2 ply weight.

I can't wait to experiment.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist

LadyGloves2.jpg

November 2010

Outfit for a saucy sailor

SailorDoll.jpg

A cute little 1940's outfit for sailor doll. Sized to fit a 16 inch doll and shown on a felt doll, (Lenci I think), with the characteristically modest expression. Quite delightful.

Instructions.

Patterns for the outfit as shown, plus the option of a skirt instead of trousers if preferred.

Beret:

With blue wool and crochet hook, make 4 ch, and join into ring with slip-stitch, then work 8 double crochet into ring.

1st Round: 2 ch, then 2 dc on each stitch (join with slip stitch to top of 2 ch at end of each round).
2nd Round: 2 ch, * 2 dc on first stitch, 1 dc on next, repeat from * to end.
3rd Round: 2 ch, * 2 dc on first stitch, 1 dc on each of next 2 stitches, repeat from * to end.
4th Round: 2 ch, * 2 dc on first stitch, 1 dc on each of next 3 stitches, repeat from * to end.
5th Round: 2 ch, * 2 dc on first ch, 1 dc on each of the next 4 stitches, repeat from * to end.

Continue in this manner, working an extra stitch between increasings each time until work measures 5½ inches across at widest part (17 rounds). Now decrease thus:-

1st Round: 2 ch, * miss 1 stitch, 17 dc, repeat from * to end.
2nd Round: 2 ch, * miss 1 stitch, 16 dc, repeat from * to end.
3rd Round: 2 ch, * miss 1 stitch, 15 dc, repeat from * to end. Continue thus, decreasing 1 stitch in each section in every row, until 7 stitches remain.
Next Round: 1 dc on each stitch all round. Fasten off.

Jumper:

FRONT: With white wool and No 12 needles, cast on 36 stitches and work ½ inch in k1, p1 rib. Change to No 10 needles and continue in stocking-stitch until work measures 2 inches. Shape armholes by casting off 2 stitches at beginning of next 2 rows, then k2tog at each end of the next 2 rows.
Work straight until piece measures 3½ inches, then shape neck.
Next Row: k11, cast off 6 loosely, knit to end. Continue on last 11 stitches only, decreasing at neck edge on every row until 7 remain.
Work 4 rows straight, then cast off.
Work the other 11 stitches to correspond reversing the shaping.

BACK: Work exactly as for front to completion of armhole shapings, then continue straight until length equals that of front to shoulders. Cast off straight across.

SLEEVES: With blue wool and No 12 needles, cast on 22 stitches and work ½ inch in k1, p1 rib. Change to No 10 needles and white wool, and continue in stocking stitch, increasing at each end of 5th and every following 6th row until there are 30 stitches on the needle. Work straight until sleeve measures 3½ inches, then shape the top by casting off 3 at the beginning of the next 2 rows, then k2tog at each end of every row until 16 remain. Cast off loosely.

COLLAR: With No 10 needles and blue wool, cast on 38 stitches and knit 8 rows garter stitch, (every row knit), slipping the first stitch of each row.
Now continue in stocking stitch with a border of 4 garter stitches at each side until work measures 2 inches.
Next Row: k12, cast off 14 stitches loosely, knit to end.
Work on the last 12 sts only, keeping the garter stitch border at the outer edge, and decreasing at the inside (neck) edge on every alternate row until 9 sts remain; now decrease on every 3rd row until 4sts remain. Continue in garter stitch for ½ inch, then cast off.

Work the remaining 12 stitches to correspond reversing the shaping.

Skirt

With No 10 needles and blue wool, cast on 183 stitches.

1st Row: k3, * p8, k5, repeat from * to last 11 stitches, p. 8, k. 3.
2nd Row: In rib, as set out in row 1, working k8, p5.

Repeat these 2 rows for 1 inch, then decrease as follows:-

Next Row: (right side facing): k3, * p2tog, p4, p2tog, k5, repeat from *, ending k3.
Next Row: Rib.
Continue in p6, k5 rib until work measures 2 inches from start, then decrease again.

Next Row: k3, * p2tog, p2, p2tog, k5, repeat from *, ending k3.
Next Row: Rib. Continue in p4, k5 rib until work measures 2¾ inches, then decrease again.

Next Row: k. 3, * (p2tog) twice, k5, repeat from *, ending k3.
Next Row:
Rib. Continue in p2, k5 rib until work measures 3½ inches.

Next Row: k. 3, * p2tog, k5, repeat from *, ending k3.
Next Row:
Rib. Work 3 more rows in p1, k5 rib.
Next Row:
p3, * p2tog, p4, repeat from *, ending p2.

Change to No 12 needles and work in k1, p1 rib until work measures 4½ inches, then cast off in rib.

Trousers (front and back alike)

With No 10 needles and blue wool, cast on 23 stitches for right leg, and work 6 rows garter stitch. Change to stocking stitch and decrease at beginning of every following 8th row (outside edge) until 18 stitches remain.
Work straight until piece measures 6 inches from start, ending with a purl row, then leave on a spare needle.
Make another piece to correspond for left leg, reversing shapings, then join the legs together by putting both sets of sts on one needle and working across all 36 stitches.

[ Editor's note: Make sure you have right side facing you for both legs and that they are arranged so that the shapings are on the outside edges.]

Continue in stocking stitch for another 2½ inches, then change to No 12 needles and work 3 rows in k1, p1 rib.

Next Row: (make holes for elastic): rib 2, * wfwd, k2tog, repeat from * to last 2 stitches, rib 2.
Rib 2 more rows, then cast off in rib.

Work a second piece in the same way.

To make up

Press all pieces lightly with a damp cloth.
Jumper: Catch shoulder seams together at armhole edges, then insert sleeves flat; join side and sleeve seams in one. Fasten each shoulder with a press-stud, then stitch centre of collar along back of neck. Make a blue crochet chain of 8 loops and stitch to front, then slip ends of collar through it.
Skirt: Join seam, then run 3 rounds of shirring elastic or similar through inside of waist ribbing.
Trousers: Join leg and side seams, then thread elastic through holes at waist.
Beret: Make a white pom-pom and stitch to centre of crown.

Sew in all ends.

Materials

Original yarn requirements:
3ozs Patons Rose, or White Heather, fingering 3 ply.
[2ozs bright blue and 1oz white shade, makes both skirt and trousers - if only one is required then 1 oz blue is sufficient.]

A pair each of No 10 (3¼mm) and No 12 (2¾mm) needles.
A No 13 (2¼mm) crochet hook.
Two press-studs.
Fine thread elastic for skirt, and narrow flat elastic for trousers.

Tension

30 sts to 4 inches on No 10 needles.

Size matters

Designed to fit a 16-inch doll.
Jumper
: Width all round, 9½ inches.
Skirt:
Length 4½ inches.
Trousers
:
Length, 9 inches.
Beret: All round inside edge, 11 inches.

Abbreviations

ch: chain
dc: double crochet remembering that this is UK notation, and in the US this stitch is referred to as single crochet.

k2tog: knit 2 sts together
p2tog: purl 2 sts together
wfwd: wool forward to making an extra stitch

A Word
on the Wool.

The pattern is sized for a 16 inch doll and needs a fine yarn that knits to a tension of 30 sts to 4 inches on 3¼mm needles.

You will have difficulty finding these fine yarns in a good range of colours. Some possibilities might be: you might look at machine knitting yarns on cones though these are usually sold in larger quantities; you might consider knitting in a crochet cotton to obtain the required gauge; you might consider trying a fine 4 ply and experimenting with finer needles to obtain the right gauge - or accept the outfit to fit a larger doll.

Be wary of the original quantities suggested - you will almost always need more than stated.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

September 2010

Bridge Jumper

BridgeJumper.jpg

This is a wonderful period jumper from 1940. I often thought I might try and adapt it but never made a decision as to how. Recently a friend on the internet borrowed the pattern to make it "as is" - quite an undertaking with all that patterning. She wanted to make it for a local Poker Club - but, as I explained, this is a Bridge Jumper - no playing poker in it mind!
So here is the pattern as it appeared originally - I will include any notes and advice from our test knitter if and when they are forthcoming.

Instructions

These are the instructions as they appear in the original pattern. They are untested with modern yarn and needles.

Front

With No 12 needles and main shade (G) cast on cast on 108 stitches and work 4½ inches in Knit 2, Purl 2 rib, increasing at the end of the last row. Change to No. 10 needles, and work 2 rows stocking stitch; then, still in stocking stitch, change to coloured pattern as follows:

1st row (right side facing): Knit 8 in main shade (G), * 3 in black (B), 13G, 1 in red (R), 13G, repeat from * to last 11 stitches, 3B, 8G.
2nd row: Purl 9G, * 1B, 14G, 1R, 14G, repeat from * to last 10 stitches, 1B, 9G.
3rd row: Knit 9G, * 1B, 13G, 3R, 13G, repeat from * to last 10 stitches, 1B, 9G.
4th row: Purl 6G, * 2B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 2B, 10G, 3R, 10G, repeat from * to last 13 stitches, 2B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 2B, 6G.
5th row: Knit 5G, * 3B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 3B, 8G, 5R, 8G, repeat from * to last 14 stitches, 3B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 3B, 5G.
6th row: Purl 5G, * 9 B, 8G, 5R, 8G, repeat from * to last 14 stitches, 9B, 5G.
7th row: Knit 5G, * 9B, 7G, 7R, 7G, repeat from * to last 14 stitches, 9B, 5G.
8th row: Purl 6G, * 7B, 7G, 9R, 7G, repeat from * to last 13 stitches, 7B, 6G.
9th row: Knit 6G, * 7B, 6G, 11R, 6G, repeat from * to last 13 stitches, 7B, 6G.
10th row: Purl 7G, * 5B, 7G, 11R, 7G, repeat from * to last 12 stitches, 5B, 7G.
11th row: Knit 7G, * 5B, 7G, 11R, 7G, repeat from * to last 12 stitches, 5B, 7G.
12th row: W: Purl 8G, * 3B, 8G, 4R, 3G, 4R, 8G, repeat from * to last 11 stitches, 3B, 8G.
13th row: Knit 8G, * 3B, 9G, 2R, 5G, 2R, 9G, repeat from * to last 11 stitches, 3B, 8G.
14th row: Purl 9G, * 1B, 29G, repeat from * to last 10 stitches, 1B, 9G.

15th-20th rows: Work in stocking stitch in main shade only.

21st row: Increase in first stitch; knit 8G, * 1R, 13G, 3B, 13G, repeat from * to last 10 stitches, 1R, 8G, increase in last stitch.
22nd row:
Purl 10G, * 1R, 14G, 1B, 14G, repeat from * to last 11 stitches, 1R, 10G.
23rd row: Knit 9G, * 3R,13G, 1B, 13G, repeat from * to last 12 stitches, 3R, 9G.
24th row: Purl 9G, * 3R, 9G, 2B, 2G, 1B, 2G, 2B, 9G, repeat from * to last 12 stitches, 3R, 9G.
25th row: Knit 8G, * 5R, 7G, 4B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 4B, 7G, repeat from * to last 13 stitches, 5R, 8G.
26th row: Purl 7G, * 7R, 6G, 11B, 6G, repeat from * to last 14 stitches, 7R, 7G.
27th row: Knit 6G, * 9R, 5G, 11B, 5G, repeat from * to last 15 stitches, 9R, 6G.
28th row: Purl 6G, * 9R, 5G, 4B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 4B, 5G, repeat from * to last 15 stitches, 9R, 6G.
29th row: Increase in first stitch; knit 6G, * 7R, 7G, 2B, 1G, 3B, 1G, 2B, 7G, repeat from * to last 14 stitches, 7R, 6G, increase in the last stitch.
30th row: Purl 9G, * 5R, 10G, 5B, 10G, repeat from * to last 14 stitches, 5R, 9 G.
31st row: Knit 10G, * 3R, 10G, 7B, 10G, repeat from * to last 13 stitches, 3R, 10 G.
32nd row: Purl 10G, * 3R, 10G, 1B, 10G, repeat from * to last 13 stitches, 3R, 10G.
33rd row: Knit 11G, * 1R, 12G, 5B, 12G, repeat from * to last 12 stitches, 1R, 11G.
34th row: Purl 11G, * 1R, 13G, 3B, 13G, repeat from * to last 12 stitches, 1R, 11G.
35th-40th rows: Work in stocking-stitch in G only, increasing at each end of the 37th row [115 stitches].

These 40 rows form the pattern.
The chart shows the 40 rows written out above.


Continue in pattern, increasing at each end of every 6th row, until there are 125 stitches on the needle, and the 32nd row of the second pattern has been worked.

Shape armhole as follows:

Continuing in pattern, cast off 5 stitches at the beginning of the next 2 rows, then decrease at each end of the next 5 rows (105 stitches).
Continue in pattern without shaping until 3rd pattern is completed.

Shape neck as follows:

1st row: Knit 6G, 3B, 13G, 1R, 59G, 1R, 13G, 3B, 6G.
2nd row: Purl 7G, 1B, 14G, 1R, 59G, 1R, 14G, 1B, 7G.
3rd row: Knit 7G, 1B, 13G, 3R, 18G, (slip these stitches on to spare needle); cast off 21; knit 18G, 3R, 13G, 1B, 7G.

Working on these last 42 stitches:-

4th row: Purl 4G, 2B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 2B, 10G, 3R, 18G.

Continue in pattern, decreasing at neck edge on next and every alternate row until 36 stitches remain and the 15th pattern row has been worked.

Shape shoulder as follows:

1st row (wrong side facing): Cast off 10 stitches at armhole edge, purl to end.
2nd row: K2tog, knit to end.

Repeat these last 2 rows once. Cast off.
Return to stitches on the spare needle; join main shade wool at centre and work left shoulder to match right, shaping at opposite edges.

Back

Work as for the front until 3rd pattern is completed, then
divide for back opening as follows:

Next row: Knit 6G, 3B, 13G, 1R, 13G, 3B, 14G, turn.

Work on these 53 stitches for the right shoulder (slip remaining stitches on to a spare needle or stitch holder).
Continue in pattern, omitting centre heart near back opening and keeping these stitches in main shade, until 4th row of 4th pattern has been worked.

Shape shoulder as follows: cast off 11 stitches at armhole edge on the next 3 alternate rows.

Cast off remaining 20 stitches.

Return to stitches left on spare needle or stitch holder. Join main shade wool at centre, cast on 4 stitches for under-lap and work to match the right shoulder, shaping at opposite edges.

Sleeves

With No 12 needles and main shade wool, cast on 73 stitches.
Work in stocking stitch for 19 rows (starting with a purl row). Change to No 10 needles and work in pattern as follows:-

1st row: Knit 6G, * 1R, 13G, 3B, 13G, repeat from * once, 1R, 6G.
2nd row: Purl 6G, * 1R, 14G, 1B, 14G, repeat from * once, 1R, 6G.
3rd row: Knit 5G, * 3R, 13G, 1B, 13G, repeat from * once, 3R, 5G.
4th row: Purl 5G, * 3R, 10G, 2B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 2B, 10G, repeat from * once, 3R, 5G.
5th row: Increase in the first stitch; knit 3G, * 5R, 8G, 3B, 1G, 1B, 1 G, 3B, 8G, repeat from * once, 5R, 3G; increase in the last stitch.
6th row: Purl 5G, * 5R, 8G, 9B, 8G, repeat from * once, 5R, 5G.
7th row: Knit 4G, * 7R, 7G, 9B, 7G, repeat from * once, 7R, 4G.
8th row: Purl 3G, * 9R, 7G, 7B, 7G, repeat from * once, 9R, 3G.
9th row: Increase in the first stitch; knit 1G, * 11R, 6G, 7B, 6G, repeat from * once, 11R, 1G; increase in the last stitch.
10th row: Purl 3G, * 11R, 7G, 5B, 7G, repeat from * once, 11R, 3G.
11th row: Knit 3G, * 11R, 7G, 5B, 7G, repeat from * once, 11R, 3G.
12th row: Purl 3G, * 4R, 3G, 4R, 8G, 3B, 8G, repeat from * once, 4R, 3G, 4R, 3G.
13th row: Increase in the first stitch; knit 3G, * 2R, 5G, 2R, 9G, 3B, 9G, repeat from * once, 2R, 5G, 2R, 3G; increase in the last stitch.
14th row: Purl 24G, 1B, 29G, 1B, 24G.
15th-20th rows: Work in stocking stitch in main colour G, increasing at each end of the 17th row.
21st row: Increase in the first stitch; knit 8G, * 3B, 13G, 1R, 13G, repeat from * once, 3B, 8G; increase in the last stitch.
22nd row: Purl 11G, * 1B, 14G, 1R, 14G, repeat from * once, 1B, 11G.
23rd row: Knit 11G, * 1B, 13G, 3R, 13G, repeat from * once, 1B, 11G.
24th row: Purl 7G, * 2B, 2G, 1B, 2G, 2B, 9G, 3R, 9G, repeat from * once, 2B, 2G, 1B, 2G, 2B, 7G.
25th row: Increase in the first stitch; knit 5G, * 4B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 4B, 7G, 5R, 7G, repeat from * once, 4B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 4B, 5G; increase in the last stitch.
26th row: Purl 7G, * 11B, 6G, 7R, 6G, repeat from * once, 11B, 7G.
27th row: Knit 7G, * 11B, 5G, 9R, 5G, repeat from * once, 11B, 7G.
28th row: Purl 7G, * 4B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 4B, 5G, 9R, 5G, repeat from * once, 4B, 1G, 1B, 1G, 4B, 7G.
29th row: Increase in the first stitch, Knit 7G, * 2B, 1G, 3B, 1G, 2B, 7G, 7R, 7G, repeat from * once, 2B, 1G, 3B, 1G, 2B, 7G; increase in the last stitch.
30th row: Purl 11G, * 5B, 10G, 5R, 10G, repeat from * once, 5B, 11G.
31st row: Knit 10G, * 7B, 10G, 3R, 10G, repeat from * once, 7B, 10G.
32nd row: Purl 10G, * 7B, 10G, 3R, 10G, repeat from * once, 7B, 10G.
33rd row: Increase in the first stitch; knit 10G, * 5B, 12G, 1R, 12G, repeat from * once, 5B, 10G; increase in the last stitch.
34th row: Purl 13G, * 3B, 13G, 1R, 13G, repeat from * once, 3B, 13 G.
35th and 36th rows: Work in stocking stitch in G [89 stitches].

Now shape top: work 4 rows in G stocking stitch, casting off 2 sts at the beginning of the first 2 rows, then decreasing at each end of the next 2 rows.
This completes one pattern. Repeat again from 1st row, being careful to place each "pip" directly over the one below (as shown in the chart), and at the same time shaping as follows:-

Work 2 rows straight, then decrease at the beginning of the next 4 rows. * Work 2 rows straight, then decrease at the beginning of the next 2 rows. Repeat from * once.
Work 16 rows straight, then decrease at each end of the next 2 alternate rows (69 stitches).
Work 2 rows straight; decrease at each end of the next row. Now decrease at each end of every following 4th row, but when commencing the 3rd pattern, omit the heart at either end and keep stitches in main shade; continue until 16th row has been worked (59 stitches). Continue in G stocking stitch, decreasing at each end of every alternate row until 49 stitches remain.
Next row: k2tog all along, ending k1.
Cast off.

Roll for neck and Sleeves

With No. 12 needles cast on 7 stitches in R and 7 stitches in B.
1st row: (p6, k1) in B, twist the threads, (k1, p6) in R.
2nd row: (k6, p1) R, twist the threads, (p1, k6) B.

Repeat these 2 rows until roll is required length. Cast off.

To Make Up

Press all parts except ribbing on the wrong side under a damp cloth.
Join side, shoulder, and sleeve seams. Set in sleeves, arranging fullness at shoulder. Sew stocking-stitch roll about 2 rows in from neck and sleeve edges, sewing along centre of roll, leaving the edges to roll under. Press all seams on wrong side.

Make three crochet buttons thus:
Make 3 chain, join in a ring, work 6 dc into ring. Work 2 dc in each stitch of last row, work 2 rows without shaping. Work 1 dc in every alternate stitch of last row. Stuff button with wool. Fasten off. Work 1 row of dc round back opening, making three loop buttonholes on right side of opening. Sew the buttons in position. Sew press-stud at extreme top of opening.

Materials

Original materials called for: 12ozs Patons Super Bouclet.
[8ozs green (main colour) and 2 ozs each in black and red.]

A pair each Nos 10 and 12 (3¼mm and 2¾mm) needles.

A press-stud.

Editor's note: The closure for the back opening uses 3 buttons and loops that are self-made using crochet, so you will need an equivalent size crochet hook for finishing.

Tension

28sts to 4 inches on No 10 needles.

Size matters

To fit 33-35 inch bust; length from top of shoulder: 20 inches; sleeve seam: 6 inches.

Abbreviations

increase: by knitting into the front and back of the next stitch.

k2tog: decrease by knitting 2 sts together.

dc: double crochet - known as single crochet in the US.

A word on the wool.

The tension and needle size for this pattern imply a standard 4 ply yarn would work. Given that bouclé yarn tends to work up fairly firmly, it might be possible to substitute a double knitting yarn to make a larger size.

Editor's note: My experience of these vintage patterns leads me to suggest that you may need far more yarn than the quantities indicate. In some cases I have needed one 50g ball (which is actually 1¾ozs) to replace each 1oz ball.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

June 2010

World Cup Fever

SportSocks.jpg

As the nail-biting tournament in South Africa dominates this month, here we have: 1940s sport socks.
I thought they were nicely in England's colours, but not exactly football socks -
I think they mean a nice decorous sport like tennis, don't you?
Red and white is the original colour scheme from the 1940s. (Possibly the original did not include quite such a Dayglo shade of red.) However, the pattern seems vaguely Scandinavian and wintery to me - I could see them perhaps in Christmas colours of a more muted red with green.

Meanwhile... Ingerland, Ingerland, Ingerland...

Instructions.

Starting at top with the cuff, using the main colour, cast on 64 stitches on three needles (21,22, 21).
[Editor's note: I recommend using one size larger needles than you use for the plain portion of the sock, as Fair Isle technique tends to pull the tension a little tighter.]
Join in a circle, being careful not to twist the stitches, and knit 2 rounds.
[Editor's note: To avoid the cuff curling up so much, I actually did one row purl then one row knit.]
Then work in the cuff pattern as follows (there is a chart at the end of the section):

3rd Round: * k1 contrast (C), k1 main (M); repeat from * to end of round.
4th Round: * k1 M, k1C; repeat from * to end of round.
5th and 6th Round: knit all round in M.
7th Round: * k1C, k2M, k2C, k2M, k3C, k2M, k2C, k2M; repeat from * to end of round.
8th Round: k2C, * k2M, k2C, k2M, k1C, k2M, k2C, k2M, k3C; repeat from * all round, ending k1C.
9th Round: * k1M, k2C, k2M, k2C, k3M, k2C, k2M, k2C; repeat from * to end of round.
10th Round: k2M, *k2C, k2M, k2C, k1M, k2C, k2M, k2C, k3M; repeat from * all round, ending k1M.
11th - 14th Rounds: Repeat 7th to 10th rounds.
15th Round: * k1C, k2M, k2C, k7M, k2C, k2M; repeat from * to end of round.
16th Round: as 8th round.
17th Round: * k1M, k2C, k4M, k3C, k4M, k2C; repeat from * to end of round.
18th Round: as10th round.
19th Round: * k1C, k4M, k2C, k3M, k2C, k4M; repeat from * to end of round.
20th Round: as 8th round.
21st Round: as 7th round.
22nd and 23rd Rounds: knit all round in M.
24th and 25th Rounds: repeat 3rd and 4th rounds.
26th and 27th Rounds: knit all round in M.

This completes the cuff.

Break colour C and continue in main colour only.
[Editor's note: Change to smaller needles here.]

Turn the work inside out to make a fold-over cuff and start to work the rounds in the opposite direction.

Work in k2, p2 rib for 3 inches [Editor's note: about 30 rows.], decreasing 8 stitches in the last round only, by knitting together every 7th and 8th stitch.

Next Round: k2tog, knit to last 2 stitches, k2tog. [54 stitches]

Now work in stocking-stitch (knit every round) for 2 inches.
[Editor's note: about 20 rows.]

Heel

Knit 13 stitches of first needle on to third needle (this is the heel needle), then turn and purl back 26 stitches; divide the remaining 28 stitches equally onto the other two needles. Work back and forth over heel needles as follows:

1st Row: slip 1 stitch knitwise, knit across remaining stitches.
2nd Row: slip 1 stitch purlwise, purl across remaining stitches.
Repeat these last 2 rows alternately until piece measures 2 inches.
[Editor's note: I recommend knitting 26 rows.]

Next Row (right side facing): knit across first 16 stitches, k2tog; turn.

Next Row: p7, p2tog; turn.
Next Row: k7, k2tog; turn.
Repeat the last 2 rows alternately until 8 stitches remain on heel needle.

Next Round: needle 1: knit across heel needle, then pick up 14 stitches down left side of heel; needle 2: knit across next two, needles (thus transferring these stitches on to one needle); needle 3: pick up 14 stitches across other side of heel and k4, from needle 1.

Hereafter, work in rounds of stocking stitch but, on every other round, k2tog at end of first needle, and (s1, k1, psso) at beginning of third needle until 54 stitches remain.

Work straight until piece measures 2 inches less than that required for overall foot length.

[Editor's note: This was about 50 rows for my UK size 4 foot. (EU 37, US 6½.]

Toe

There should be 13 stitches on first needle, 28 on the second needle, and 13 on the third needle. End of round is centre of sole. Work 1 round, decreasing at each end of second needle, then one round straight.

Now there are 13 stitches on first needle, 26 on the second needle, and 13 on the third needle.

Next Round: knit to within 3 stitches of the end of the first needle, k2tog, k1; on second needle, k1, (s1, k1, psso), knit to within last 3 stitches, then k2tog, k1; on third needle, k1, (s1, k1, psso), knit to end of round.
Work 1 round straight.

Repeat the last 2 rounds until 16 stitches remain.
Transfer the stitches on to two needles, having 8 stitches on each needle and divided so that sole lies flat.

Graft the stitches together.

Making up

Sew in all ends. Fold down cuff.

Materials

3ozs Patons Real Shetland Wool.
[2 ozs main shade and 1oz contrasting shade. Original uses white and scarlet].

A set of four No 11 needles, pointed at both ends.

Tension

30 stitches = 4ins

Size matters

Length of foot, 9 inches (adjustable).

Abbreviations

M is main shade (white).
C is contrast (red).

psso: pass the slipped stitch over, (also known as "ssk"; effectively you are "knitting 2 together through back loops").

A Word
on the Wool.

The recommended wool was Patons Real Shetland Wool.

I used Cygnet Wool-Rich 4ply. I chose this yarn as it seemed fine enough to achieve the required tension. I worked mainly on No 12 needles (one size smaller than specified) using No 11s for the Fair Isle section. However I think a conventional 4 ply at 28sts to 4 inches would make a better fabric.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

July 2009

Dainty Bolero

DaintyBolero.jpg

I cannot do better than quote the original introduction from the 1940s.

"The charm of this little bolero is that it makes either a dainty bed-jacket, or attractive Angora coatee, for day or evening wear. The pretty shape makes it fit beautifully and you will find the openwork sleeves and border simple and quick to do."

I will add that you should choose your colours and styling carefully, otherwise its roots as a bed-jacket may be too obvious. When I knitted Rowan's Carolina by Sharon Miller in pale blue/grey - which is lovely in my opinion - I find myself unable to wear it as day wear and feel it needs to be in a more striking colour for evening wear. (Matches my pyjamas nicely though...)

Note that this pattern is untested, and reproduced here as per the original.

Instructions.

The body of the bolero is worked in fancy rib over 2 rows as follows:

1st Row: Knit.
2nd Row: (K1, p1) repeated across row.
[Editor's note: Keep the rib aligned as you increase and decrease to get the shape.]

Back

Cast on 84 stitches and work in ribbed pattern as above.
K keeping the continuity of the rib carefully, cast off 2 stitches at the beginning of every row until 44 sts remain.

Now cast off 1 stitch at beginning of every row till 16 sts remain.

Work 20 rows straight.

Continue to work in pattern but increase 1 st at each end of the next and every following 3rd row until there are 26 sts on the needle.
Cast off.

Side Pieces

Using three needles, pick up and knit 110 stitches up right side of back piece, then cast on 122 stitches. Arrange the sts as follows:
1st needle: 92 stitches; 2nd needle: 70 stitches; 3rd needle: 70 stitches.

Join into a round and work 20 rounds in pattern.

Next Round: * k2, k2tog; repeat from * to end.
Work 15 more rounds in pattern, beginning with a rib row.
Next Round: k2tog all round, casting off firmly at the same time.

Work second side to correspond.

Border

With five needles, using 2 strands of wool together, and right side facing, pick up and knit 42 stitches across lower edge of back, 60 stitches round right side, 13 across back of neck and 60 stitches round left side.

1st Round: Knit.
2nd Round: Purl.
3rd Round: Knit.
4th Round: Purl.
5th Round: * K1 winding wool round needle 5 times; repeat from * to end.
6th Round: Purl, dropping all the stitches wound round needle.
7th Round: Knit.
8th Round: Purl, increasing once in every 4th stitch.
9th Round: Knit.
10th Round: * P1 winding wool round needle 5 times; repeat from * to end.
11th Round: Knit, dropping all the stitches wound round needle. 12th Round: Purl.
13th Round: Knit.

Repeat 12th and 13th rounds, then 12th round again.
Now, with crochet hook, fasten off by working 1dc into each stitch as it comes off the needle, with 1 chain loosely in between.

Sleeves

Starting at the top with two needles and double wool, cast on 36 stitches and knit 4 rows garter stitch (every row knitted).


5th Row: * K1 winding wool round needle 5 times; repeat from * to end.
6th Row: Cast on 3, knit to end, dropping all loop stitches.
7th Row: Cast on 3, knit to end.
8th Row: Knit.

Repeat from once, then 5th row again.

Next Row: Cast on 6 stitches, knit to end, dropping all loop stitches.
Next Row: Cast on 6 stitches, knit to end.
Next Row: Knit.


Next Row: * K1 winding wool round needle 5 times; repeat from * to end.
Next Row: K2tog, knit to the last 2 sts, k2tog.
Next Row: Knit.
Next Row: K2tog, knit to the last 2 sts, k2tog.

Repeat from once, and then again omitting decreasings.
Knit 2 rows.
Cast off.

Making up

Press very lightly only.
Join sleeve seams and sew in sleeves.
Press back border round neck to form roll collar .

Materials

Original quoted 5ozs Beehive Non-Shrink Baby Wool 3ply.

Five No 7 (4½mm) double-pointed needles, or one pair of needles and a circular needle.

No 8 (4mm) crochet hook.

[Alternative 9 (½ oz) balls Patons Fuzzy-Wuzzy Angora and five No 8 (4mm) needles]

Tension

28 stitches to 4 inches over pattern rib in back; 40 stitches to 4 inches over pattern rib in side pieces.

Size matters

To fit size 32-36 inch bust; length from top of shoulder to lower edge, 16 inches; sleeve seam, 4½ inches.

Abbreviations

k2tog: knit 2 sts together (decrease).

dc: double crochet remembering that this is UK notation, and in the US is referred to as single crochet.

ch: chain

A Word
on the Wool.

I have not made this up in a modern equivalent yarn so have no comments to offer from experience. From the tension, and the possible substitution of the angora yarn, it seems this would knit up with a modern 4 ply rather than 3 ply. Generally I refute the claim that old wools were thicker than modern ones - the bottom line is that in times past people patiently knitted much finer wools than we like today. However I have noticed that in the 1940s patterns there is no doubt that some of the 3 plys have tensions of 7 sts to the inch rather than the 8 or 9 that you expect with a 3 ply. I plan to knit this using handspun (hence not completed yet....)

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

EveningCoatee.jpg


November 2008

Gold Mesh Bag

GoldBag.jpg

From November 1940:
"This pretty gold mesh bag will rejoice the hearts of those can still enjoy a little social life. Personally we are at this moment sitting in an air-raid shelter!"
One wonders if that was literally true - but I am sure the editorial team spent a lot of their time in shelters in this period of history in the UK.

Instructions

Starting at the top make 37 chain.

1st row: Miss 2 ch; 35tr; turn with 2ch.
2nd row: 35tr, working into the front of each st; turn with 2ch.
3rd row: 35tr, working into the back of each st (right side facing); turn with 2ch.
4th row: as second, but make 5ch at the end of this row; pull through thread and fasten off. Cut the thread.
[Editor's note: This is the piece of work that fits into the metal frame. Your 35 treble need to be as wide as the handle frame and your 4 rows need to be as deep as the frame. My frame was roughly 5 x 2 inches; my width was OK but I needed to add in 2 rows to make the length, so I repeated rows 2 and 3 before moving on to row 4 as above, making 6 rows in all. Beware if you make a odd number of rows as there is a "right side" to this work - working into the front and back of the sts makes ribs on the right side.
I thought I would have to
add width as well (the frame size stated as 5¾ins and my work was barely 5); however, once I got the frame it was clear that my work fitted perfectly as the insertion width was about 5¼ins plus you do need the work to be very slightly stretched, not relaxed.
My advice is get the frame in your hot little hand first and make the bag to fit.

Be careful if you do add chain to make the bag wider, as you will need to be able to make the shell pattern fit later on. I varied my crochet hook size until I got a satisfactory tension to achieve the right width, rather than adding in sts.]

Now make a second piece exactly the same, and at the end of the final row, make 5ch, and then join the two pieces together by working across the first piece to end of 5ch in slipstitch, then slipstitch across 2nd piece, making a round.

Now change to pattern and work backwards and forwards in rows,
[Editor's note: This confused me at first - but you are "working backwards and forwards" and slip stitching at the end of each row to join the round.]
working into the back of each stitch as follows:

1st row: 1ch; 3dc into 3rd of 5 ch; 3dc into first space * miss 2 spaces; 3 dc into next space; repeat from * across all trebles; then 3dc into 3rd of 5 ch; work across the other side as for the first [27 groups]. Slipstitch into the middle of 3dc made on the 5ch. Turn.

2nd row: (1dc, 1tr, 1dc) into middle of each group of 3dc. Turn with a slipstitch to the next treble.

3rd row: 1dc into same treble as slipstitch, * (1dc, 3tr, 1dc) into next group, 1dc into centre of next group, * repeat from * to * once.
Work a group of (1dc, 3tr, 1dc) into each of the next 3 groups; repeat from * to * twice.
Work a group of (1dc, 3tr, 1dc) into each of the next 2 groups.
[Editor's note: This completes one "side"; it seems asymmetrical as you have one shell group designed to sit on the side of the bag.]
Work the other side of the bag to correspond.
There should now be 18 shell groups of (1dc, 3tr, 1dc) in all.
Turn with a slipstitch into second treble.

4th row: (1dc, 5tr, 1dc) into the middle of each group; turn with a slipstitch into second treble.
5th row: As 4th.

6th row: (1dc, 7tr, 1dc) into the middle of each group; turn with a slipstitch into second treble.
7th row-10th row: As 6th.

Now pinch the two sides of the bag together at the bottom edge and slipstitch across from one side to the other, taking two outside scallops together, to join. The scallops that were on the "side" of the bag are twisted slightly to accomplish this, joining 9 full scallops and avoiding a half-scallop at the sides of this edge.
Fasten off.

Making up:

Sew in all ends.
Sew bag to frame. You are intended to "draw up the work at the sides" so that it fits over the hinges, but as my work was lightly stretch over the frame - and I think due to the design of the frame - I could not make this work, and the hinges are exposed in the finished bag.
[Editor's note: Some frames have no holes in them for sewing and you are intended to glue the fabric in place; check carefully before you purchase.]
Make a fabric lining; I used a fine corded velvet (a remnant) in black.

If your frame has fasteners designed for a cord handle, make a cord or buy a fine chain to form the handle. I made a kumihimo cord, as this is a current interest of mine.

Materials

Example shown is made from 2 balls of Twilleys Goldfingering.

Bag handles from Bags of Handles
[see under 'frames'].
I used this one.

One No. 11 (3mm) crochet hook.

Fabric remnant for lining.

Crochet abbreviations:

ch = chain
tr = treble crochet
dc = double crochet

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Tension

No tension given - my 37 treble worked out to 5 inches when not eased out on frame.

Size matters

Fits 5¼ inch width handle.
My advice is get the frame first and make the bag to fit, by varying the hook size or adding stitches.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

February 2008

Mittens for the Forces

Forces_mittens.jpg

These are double layered mittens which have suddenly become popular again (probably more the height of fashion a year or so ago - as well as half a century ago). This pattern is from February 1940. Here the thumb is left free; in some designs of this era, the thumb and forefinger are left free - your "trigger finger " I assume.
"The glove mitts are a sensible idea, ensuring both warmth and freedom of movement. Instructions are given for both men's and women's sizes".
The different sizes are achieved by using different wool weights and needles.

Instructions (both hands alike)

Using No. 14 (2mm) needles cast on 48 stitches, and work in k2, p2 rib in rounds for 2½ inches.

Next row: Knit twice into every stitch.

Now slip every alternate stitch (ie every "made" stitch) on to No 12(11) needles and leave the original 48 sts on the No14 needles on the outside of the work.

[Editor's note: The original instructions expect you to continue to knit on the larger needles, leaving the outer sts on the No 14 needles. I found this very awkward; I thought it would improve as I got further up the glove but it did not.
So I took the trouble, after I had slipped the sts as shown, to thread the outer sts onto waste yarn (slippery yarn, as the Tweed wool is felty), and then when I had finished the inner glove, rethread them back on to the 14 needles.]

Continue on the No 12(11) needles, on the "made" sts, in rounds of plain knitting, and work 2 rows straight.

3rd round: Knit twice into first st, knit to the last st, knit twice into it.
Knit 2 rounds.

6th round: Knit twice into first st, knit to the last 2sts, knit twice into next st, k1.
Knit 2 rounds.

9th round: Knit twice into first st, knit to the last 3sts, knit twice into next st, k2.
Knit 2 rounds.

Continue in this way, increasing on every 3rd row at either side of the thuumb, until there are 66 sts on the needles.

Divide for thumb
Next round: K8; leave next 50 sts a holder (or holders); cast on 4 sts in waste wool and knit them onto the working needle; knit remaining 8 sts of round. [20sts]

Continue on these 20 sts for 22 rounds.
Next round: K2tog all round.
Next round: Knit
Next round: K2tog all round.
Draw thread through remaining sts and fasten off.

Rejoin wool to continue with the main part of the mitten:
remove the waste wool and pick up 4 sts at the base of the thumb, then knit the 50 sts from the holder. [54sts]

Work 18 rounds straight on these 54 sts.

Divide for fingers
Next round (forefinger): K10; leave leave next 38 sts a holder (or holders); cast on 4 sts in waste wool and knit them onto the working needle; knit remaining 6sts of round. [20sts]

Work 3 rounds straight on these 20 sts, then work 4 rounds k1, p1 rib. Cast off loosely in rib.

Next round (middle finger): Remove the waste wool and pick up 4 sts at the base forefinger. Knit first 6 sts from holder; cast on 4 sts in waste wool and knit them onto the working needle; slip the last 6 sts on holder onto a needle and knit them. [20sts]

Complete as for forefinger.

Next round (third finger): Work and complete as for middle finger.

Next round (little finger): Remove the waste wool and pick up 4 sts at the base third finger, and knit the remaining 14 sts from holder. [18sts]

Work as before over these 18 sts.

Over-mitten
Now return to sts left on the No 14 needles at the wrist.
[Editor's note: Or - thread the sts on the spare wool back on to the No 14 needles.]
Join in the wool at the beginning of the round, (base of the thumb), and with No 11 (10) needles, work backwards and forwards in stocking stitch, (one row plain, one row purl), for 5 inches.

Next row (right side facing): K2tog; k21; k2tog; k21; k2tog.
Work 5 rows straight.
7th row: K2tog; knit to centre; k3tog; knit to the last 2 sts; k2tog.

Continue in stocking stitch, decreasing as for 7th row on every 6th row until 37 sts remain.
Work 3 rows straight.
Then decrease in the same way on every row until 9 sts remain.
Cast off.

Making up
Press stocking-stitch portions with a damp cloth. Darn in all ends. Insert zip down side of outer mitten, starting at top and ending with the pull just above the thumb; join the remainder of seam across top of fingers. The edges of the outer mitten should fit nicely round the thumb; finish these with a row of double crochet.

Mit_zips.jpg

Materials

Example shown is knitted in 3 x 25g balls Rowan 4ply Tweed.

Set of 4 each of numbers 14, 12 and 11 (UK size) needles for the smaller size, and 14, 11 and 10 for the larger size.
A number 12 crochet hook.

Two 4-inch zip fasteners.

Tension

Approx. 8st to 1 inch

Rowan 4ply tweed tension: 28st and 40rows to 4 inches (10cm) using No 11 (3mm) needles.

Size matters

To fit size 6¼-7, or 7½-8½ inch hand.

A word on the wool.

Original calls for 2oz 3 ply for girl's size [sic] and 3oz 4ply for man's size.
I have often read that older 3 or 4 ply wools were thicker than 3 or 4 plies of today; I have not really noticed that before in practice - however I think a large man's mitten could be knitted in guernsey 5ply or a light weight DK, like Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 



Balaclava.jpg
This 'good old Balaclava helmet' was included in the item "More Knitteds for the Forces".
I know - they are nice and warm - and they can be useful on the slopes - but I'm given to understand that beanies are more the thing currently, so I have spared you the details!
Let me know if, (your imagination no doubt fired by the hunk on the left), you want to knit it.

I'm afraid I also have to report that George says these are the silliest mittens he has ever had. Good thing he was not called upon to be in the Home Guard 50 or more years ago, eh?.

January 2008

Boudoir Bedroom Boots

Boudoir_boots.jpg

Second pattern this month from an "Oddments" leaflet for "using up old Scraps of Wool", dating anywhere between the 1930s and the 1950s. Described originally as Lady's Bedsocks*, I hope they will prove to be the perfect partner for Boudoir Bedjacket.

*One of the other patterns was called "Bedroom Boots" and I couldn't resist the alliteration; however, this pattern described here makes footwear that is much more elegant than either "bedsocks" or "boots" implies. They look at their best when on the feet, (as opposed to just after you have knitted them, when they look like a pair of unattractive caterpillars). It is hard for me to date the design, as many patterns were reproduced out of their true era; possibly an expert on publishing could be more accurate.

Instructions

Each sock is worked in one piece. Make two alike.

Commence at the front edge. Using No. 12 needles, cast on 64 stitches, and work 6 rows in k1, p1 rib.
Change to No. 6 needles.

**
Row 1: (right side) Knit twice into every stitch. [128 sts].
Row 2: Sl.1, purl to the last st, k1.
Work 4 rows in stocking stitch (k 1 row, p 1 row).
Row 7: *K2tog; repeat from * to end of row. [64 sts].
Work 5 rows in k1, p1 rib. **
This completes a 12 row pattern.
Repeat from ** to ** twice and then from ** until you have completed the 7th pattern row.

Change to No. 12 needles. Work 6 rows in k1, p1 rib.
Cast off loosely in rib.

Making up - Press each piece lightly on the wrong side under a damp cloth with a hot iron.
Join the cast on and cast off edges together, then continue the seam, stitching up one end for the toe.

Crochet edging - Using the main colour, work a picot edge all around the top of each of the socks, as follows:

One slip st to secure the yarn to the top front edge.
*3ch, 1dc into the first of these chain, miss 1 st, 1 slip st into the next st. Repeat from * around each top.

Embroidery
Using the contrasting wool, work pairs of chain stitches, (or a kind of "lazy daisy" stitch) in a "V" shape down each front seam.
[Editor's note: The link above is to Sharon Boggon's lovely site "In a minute Ago". She is an artist who is interested in the connections between textiles and digital technology, and has created a wonderful site, full of interesting information (and a blog!)]

Materials

Original pattern calls for 2oz of 4ply, and a small quantity of contrast for embroidery.
Example shown is knitted in 2 x 50g balls of Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino, in colour 007.

One pair each of number 12, an No 6 needles.

Tension

20st to 4 inches (10cm) on No 6 (5mm) needles.

Size matters

One size fits all.

A word on the wool.

Baby Cashmerino is heavier than a 4ply, knitting to a tension of 25st and 34 rows to 4 inches. Thus I used more yarn than the original pattern. Each 50g is 125m, and I used 90g.

Boudoir_boots2.jpg

As a variation (or to "use up old scraps of wool") you might choose to make the picot edging in the contrast colour to match the embroidery - I believe this would work better if the contrast were darker than the main colour.
Alternatively, if you are not confident in your embroidery skills (I found it harder than I had imagined) you could stick with a single colour and embroider in the main yarn; this provides a more sophisticated look - if indeed a bedsock can be said in any way to contribute to a sophisticated look!

© Christina Coutts 2007

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