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December 2013

Fireside Slippers

FiresideSlippers.jpg

A lovely old-fashioned pair of knitted slippers. Make them using a luxury yarn in a striking colour for a quickly knitted Christmas gift.

Instructions

Instructions in 3 sizes, each size separated by forward slash (/).

Both slippers are worked alike.

Slipper (make 2)

With No 11 needles, cast on 90/95/100 stitches and work 12 rows in garter stitch (that is: every row knitted).

Change to pattern as follows:

1st row: k4, * p2, k3; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, p2, k4.
2nd row: k1, p3, * p3, k2; repeat from * to last 4 stitches, p3, k1.

3rd row: k1, * wfwd, slip 1, k2tog, psso, wrn, p2, * to last 4 stitches, wfwd, slip 1, k2tog, psso, wrn, k1.
4th row: as 2nd row.

Repeat these 4 rows 3 times more, then rows 1-3 inclusive again: 19 pattern rows.

Work 5 rows in garter stitch.

Cast off.

Make a second slipper in the same way.

To Make Up

Press parts lightly on wrong side under a damp cloth.

Fold foot pieces in half and join centre back and foot seams neatly with a flat seam.

Thread ties through holes made in 19th row of the patterning.
You can find information from Sirdar on making ties here.

Press seams.

Note:
You may like to cover the soles of the slippers with a non-slip material such as a washable non-slip liner available in limited colours from (for example) Wilkinsons in the UK.

Materials

3/3/3oz Double Knitting yarn.

One pair each No 8 (4mm) needles.

Tension

22 stitches by 30rows to 4 inches over stocking stitch on 4mm needles

Size matters

To fit 3 sizes
small/medium/large.

Abbreviations

wrn: wool round needle
wfwd: wool forward

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.


....so.... speaking of quickly knitted gifts....

An extra Christmas gift just for you. Don't bother to thank me - it's priceless I think you'll agree.
Perfect if you are thinking of elf-themed fancy dress this Christmas - and I can recommend that you use any left-over felt to make a matching elfish pointy collar.

FiresideSlippers.jpg

They miss out the key instruction at the end of the making up section .... "Do not wear".
Joking apart, this method of threading ribbon or fabric strips through a crocheted mesh base is a good technique for creating an interesting textured fabric to work with. I have seen it used to good effect making, for example, an evening clutch bag, using more luxurious starting materials.

November 2013

Traditional Cosy Set

TraditionalCosySet.jpg

The archetypal cosy design (maybe with a few too many pom-poms for historical verisimilitude but who's counting?). And - no idea why the British are quite so obsessed with hats for their eggs, but it does seem that there is always a matching egg cosy* to complete the set.

* I think with very fine wool and a bit of adaptation these could become knitted hats for the Big Knit - a campaign from Innocent Smoothies, who are again putting knitted hats on their bottles this year in aid of Age UK (helping older folk face the winter). The advertising says "knit a hat this November" however unfortunately the deadline for knitting is past as the campaign aims to have the hats in place during November - so maybe next year....
However, you can still join in by designing your own virtual hat and sharing on Facebook (10p donation from Innocent), or by buying a smoothie with a hat (25p donation by Innocent), or with a direct donation. Have a look on their website - there are free mini-hat patterns!

Instructions

The pleats are formed by each colour being drawn up across the back of the colour just used and keeping all the strands to the wrong side of the work throughout.

Tea Cosy (make 2 pieces)

With No 8 needles and light colour (L), cast on 98sts and knit 5 rows.

Join in Dark colour (D) and proceed in pattern as follows:

1st row: k1L, k6D; * k7L, k7D; repeat from * to last 7 stitches, k6L, k1D.
[Editor's note: Remember you are pulling the unused colour across the back of the knitting to draw up the pleats as you work - this is the reverse of the effect you are usually trying to achieve when you strand colours across the back.]
2nd row: k1D, k6L; * k7D, k7L; repeat from * to last 7 stitches, k6D, k1L.
3rd-6th rows: Repeat 1st and 2nd rows twice.
7th row: k1D, k6L; * k7D, k7L; repeat from * to last 7 stitches, k6D, k1L.
8th row: k1L, k6D; * k7L, k7D; repeat from * to last 7 stitches, k6L, k1D.
9th-12th rows: Repeat 7th and 8th rows twice.

Repeat 1st and 2nd rows until work measures 6 inches from beginning finishing at the end of 2nd row.

Shape top as follows:
1st row: k2togL, k3D, k2togD, * k2togL, k3L, k2togL, k2togD, k3D, k2tog.D; repeat from * to last 7 stitches, k2togL, k3L, k2togD

2nd row: klD, k4L, * k5D, k5L; repeat from * to last 5 stitches, k4D, k1L.
3rd row: k2togL, k1D, k2togD, * k2togL, k1L, k2togL, k2tog.D, klD, k2togD; repeat from * to last 5 stitches, k2togL, k1L, k2togD.
4th row: klD, k2L, * k3D, k3L; repeat from * to last 3 stitches, k2D, k1L.
5th row: k2togL, k1D, * k2togL, k1L,k2tog.D, klD; repeat from * to last 3 stitches, k2togL, k1D.
6th row: klD, k1L, * k2D, k2L; repeat from * to last 2 stitches, k1D, k1L.
7th row: (k2togL) twice, * k2tog.D, k2togL; repeat from * to last 4 stitches, (k2togD) twice.

Break off wool, thread end of Light colour through the remaining stitches, draw up and fasten off securely.

Make another piece in same manner.

To Make Up the Tea Cosy

Stitch side and top seams leaving openings for handle and spout.
Using Light colour make make 3 pom-poms and attach to top of cosy. With 2 strands of Dark, crochet a chain and arrange loops on top of cosy as in photograph.


Egg Cosy (make 1 piece)

With No 10 needles and light colour (L) in 3 ply, cast on 72sts and knit 3 rows.

Join in Dark colour (D) and proceed in pattern as follows:

1st row: k1L, k5D; * k6L, k6D; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, k5L, k1D.
[Editor's note: Remember you are pulling the unused colour across the back of the knitting to draw up the pleats as you work - this is the reverse of the effect you are usually trying to achieve when you strand colours across the back.]
2nd row: k1D, k5L; * k6D, k6L; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, k5D, k1L.
3rd-4th rows: Repeat 1st and 2nd rows.
5th row: k1D, k56L; * k6D, k6L; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, k5D, k1L.
6th row: k1L, k5D; * k6L, k6D; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, k5L, k1D.
7th-8th rows: Repeat 5th and 6th rows.

Repeat 1st and 2nd rows until work measures 2¾ inches from beginning finishing at the end of 2nd row.

Shape top as follows:
1st row: k1L, k2togD, k3D, * k2togL, k4L, k2togD, k4D; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, k2togL, k3L, k1D

Work from to as on Tea Cosy.

To Make Up the Egg Cosy

Stitch side seam.
Using Light colour make a pom-pom and attach to top of cosy. With 2 strands of Dark, crochet a chain and arrange loops on top of cosy as in photograph.

Materials

Tea Cosy: 3oz light colour (L) and 2oz dark (D) Double Knitting Yarn

Egg Cosy: 1oz light colour (L) and 1oz dark (D) 3ply yarn

A pair of No 8 (4mm) needles for the tea cosy and No 10 (3¼mm) needles for the egg cosy plus crochet hook.

Tension

22sts x 30 rows to 4 ins for the tea cosy and
30sts x 38 rows to 4 ins for the egg cosy over stocking stitch.

Size matters

To fit "a large sized teapot".
[Editor's note: Egg cosy size not specified!]

Abbreviations

k2tog: decrease by knitting 2 sts together.

For information on making pom-poms
click here
to see a previous entry on this site.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

CherryCosy.jpg

July 2013

Crochet Bootees for a Special Baby

CrochetBootees.jpg

Well - it's so much talked about I could not let it pass without a little commemoration could I?
Just make sure you make them for your own special baby - I am sure the Palace is exploding with little woolly items (and in one of the hottest month's on record...).

This crochet pattern is a staggered shell, which I found a little tricky to follow, so use the detail photo at the end for guidance as to what it should look like.

Instructions.

Special pattern stitch:
Picot: make 5 ch, then work 1 dc into 2nd of these 5 ch

And a reminder of English crochet stitches:

Double crochet: draw a loop through next stitch, draw a loop through both loops on hook. [American single].
Half treble: pass yarn round hook, draw a loop through next stitch, draw a loop through all 3 loops on hook. [American double]
Treble: pass yarn round hook, draw a loop through next stitch, draw a loop through first 2 loops on hook, then draw another loop through 2 remaining loops.
Double treble: pass yarn twice round hook, draw a loop through next stitch, draw a loop through first 2 loops on hook, draw a loop through next 2 loops, then another through last 2 loops.
Triple treble: (not used in this pattern) pass yarn three times round hook, draw a loop through next stitch, draw a loopthrough first 2 loops on hook, draw a loop through next 2 loops, another through next 2 loops, then another through last 2 loops.

Bootees (make 2)

Beginning at the sole: make 15(17;20;23)ch loosely.

1st round: Miss 3 ch, 3 tr in next ch, 1 tr in each of next 1(1;2;2) ch, 1 htr in next ch, 1 dc in each of next 2 ch, 1 htr in next ch, 1 tr in each of next 2(3;3;4) ch, 1 d tr in each of next 3(4;6;8) ch, 9 dtr in last ch.
Now, work along other side of ch, working 1 dtr in each of next 3(4;6;8) ch, 1 tr in each of next 2(3;3;4) ch, 1 htr in next ch, 1 dc in each of next 2 ch, 1 htr in next ch, 1 tr in each of next 1(1;2;2) ch, 4 tr in same place as first 3 tr; sl st into 3rd ch at beginning to join the round.

2nd round: 3 ch, "inc", 1 tr in next st, "inc", 1 tr in each of next 10(12;15;18) sts, ("inc", 1 tr in next st) 4 times, "inc", 1 tr in each of next 10(12;15;18) sts, ("inc", 1 tr in next st) twice, sl st in 3rd ch at beginning. You now have 46(50;56;62) tr, counting the initial 3 ch as 1 tr.

3rd round: Working into the back loops only (leaves a ridge to mark sole): 3 ch, 1 tr in each tr to end; sl st in 3rd ch at beginning.

4th round: 3 ch, 1 tr in each tr to end; sl st in 3rd ch at beg.

Repeat the 4th round 0(0;1;1) time(s).

Shape Instep

You are now going to work back and forth across the instep in rows.

1st row: 3 ch, 1 tr in each of next 28(30;33;36) tr, miss next tr, sl st across next 2 tr. Turn.
2nd row: Miss 2 sl sts, 1 tr in each of next 10 tr, miss next tr, sl st across next 2 tr. Turn.

Repeat the 2nd row 4(4;4;6) times.

Next row: Miss 2 sl st, 1 tr in each of next 10 tr, 1 tr in each tr to end; sl st in 3rd ch at beg of 1st row to rejoin the round. You now have 28(32;38;38) tr.

Next round: 4 ch, miss 1(1;2;2) tr, 1 tr in next tr, * 1 ch, miss 1 tr, 1 tr in next tr, repeat from * to last 1(1;2;2) sts, miss last 1(1;2;2) sts, sl st in 3rd of 4 ch to join the round. You now have 14(16;18;18) holes.

Next round: 1 ch, 1 dc in same place as sl st, * 1 dc in next 1 ch sp, 1 dc in next tr, repeat from * to last ch sp, 1 dc in 1 ch sp, 1 dc in same place as first dc, DO NOT JOIN the round.
You now have 29(33;37;37) dc.

Turn, and work in rows as follows:

First size only:

1st row (wrong side): 1 ch, 2 dc in first dc, * 3 ch, miss 3 dc, (1 dc, 3 ch, 3 tr) in next dc, miss 2 dc, (1 dc, 1 ch, 1 dc) in next dc, repeat from * ending last repeat with 2 dc in last dc instead of (1 dc, 1 ch, 1 dc).

2nd, 3rd and 4th sizes:

1st row (wrong side): 1 ch, 2 dc in first dc, * 3 ch, miss 3 dc, (1 dc, 3 ch, 3 tr) in next dc, miss 2 dc, (1 dc, 1 ch, 1 dc) in next dc *; repeat from * to * (0;1;1) times; 3ch, miss (2;3;3) dc, (1 dc, 3 ch, 3 tr) in next dc, miss (2;3;3) dc, (1 dc, 1 ch, 1 dc) in next dc (3;1;1) times; repeat from * to * (1;2;2) times, ending last repeat with 2 dc in last dc instead of (1 dc, 1 ch, 1 dc).

All sizes: You now have 4(5;5;5) patterns.

2nd row: (3 ch, 1 tr) in first dc, * 3 ch, (1 dc, 3 ch, 3 tr) in next 3 ch sp, miss next 3 ch sp, (1 tr, 1 ch, 1 tr) in next 1 ch sp, repeat from * ending last repeat with 2 tr in last dc instead of (1 tr, 1 ch, 1 tr).

3rd row: (3 ch, 1 tr) in first tr, * 3 ch, (1 dc, 3 ch, 3 tr) in next 3 ch sp, miss next 3 ch sp, (1 tr, 1 ch, 1 tr) in next 1 ch sp, repeat from * ending last repeat with 2 tr in top of turning ch instead of (1 tr, 1 ch, 1 tr).

Repeat the 3rd row 1(1;3;3) times.

Next row: (3 ch, 1 tr) in first tr, * 3 ch, 1 dc in next 3 ch sp, 3 ch, miss 1 sp, (1 tr, 1 ch, 1 tr) in next 1 ch sp, repeat from * ending last repeat with 2 tr in top of turning ch instead of (1 tr, 1 ch, 1 tr).

Next row: (3 ch, 2 tr) in first tr, * miss 1 sp, (3 tr, "Picot", 3 tr) in next dc, miss 1 sp, (3 tr, "Picot", 3 tr) in next 1 ch sp, repeat from * to last pattern, miss 1 sp, (3 tr, "Picot", 3 tr) in next dc, miss 1 sp, 3 tr in top of turning ch, "Picot". Fasten off.

Make Up

Using a flat seam, join back seam.
Thread ribbon through holes at ankle.
It is recommended not to press these bootees, owing to the crochet texture.

Materials

1 ball 3ply.

3mm crochet hook.

1m of ribbon

Tension

24.5 tr and 14 rows = 10cm using 3mm hook

Size matters

The pattern is given in 4 sizes: length of sole 7(8;9;11) cm

Crochet abbreviations:

ch: chain
dc: double crochet
tr: treble crochet
htr: half treble
dtr: double treble

sl st: slip stitch
yoh: yarn over hook;
inc: increase - work 2 tr in next tr
dec: decrease - (yoh, draw up a loop in next st, yoh and draw through first 2 loops on hook) twice, yoh and draw through all 3 loops on hook

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

Picture of pattern detail:

CrochetBootees.jpg

Knitted Bootees for a Special Baby

KnittedBootees.jpg

Well - it's so much talked about I could not let it pass without a little commemoration could I?
Just make sure you make them for your own special baby - I am sure the Palace is exploding with little woolly items (and in one of the hottest month's on record...).

This is the knitted set which is fairly plain with a discreet eyelet pattern, and should be quite simple to make.

Bootees (make 2)

With No 10 needles, cast on 33 sts. and knit 1 row.

1st - 4th rows: Knit.
5th row (eyelet row): K1; (yfwd., k2tog) 16 times.
6th - 8th rows: Knit.
9th row: Knit.
10th row (eyelet row): K1; (yfwd., k2tog) 16 times.
11th - 20th rows: as 1st to 10th rows inclusive.

Repeat the last 2 rows 4 times more.

Next row: as 5th row.
Next row: as 10th row.
Next row: K23. Turn.
Next row: K1; p11; k1.

Work 14 rows in stocking stitch on these 13 sts.
Break off yarn.

Rejoin yarn to inside edge of 10 sts, then knit up 10 sts along side of foot; knit across 13 sts on needle, knit up 10 sts from other side of foot, finally knit across remaining 10 sts. [53 sts]
Knit 9 rows (garter stitch - every row knit).

Shape toe:

1st row: (k1, k2tog, k21, k2tog) twice; k1.
2nd row: K1, k2tog, knit to the last 3 sts; k2tog; k1.
3rd row: (k1, k2tog, k18, k2tog) twice; k1.
4th row: as 2nd row.

Cast off.

Make Up

Press lightly on wrong side. Join seam.
Using 2 lengths of twisted yarn 40 in. long, make a cord and thread through holes at ankle.
Sew a tassel to each end of cord.
Press seams.

Materials

1 25g ball Quickerknit - for example Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino

Pair of No 10 (3¼mm) needles.

Tension

26sts x 34 rows to 4 inches on No 9 (3¾mm) needles

Size matters

The pattern is given in one size.

Abbreviations:

yfwd: yarn forward; makes an extra stitch which forms a small pattern hole when knitted on the next row.
k2tog: knit 2 sts together to decrease a stitch

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

June 2013

French Poodle

FrenchPoodle.jpg

How very 1950s! How very French!.
How could I resist?
At first glance I assumed this was the more usual toilet roll cover (because nobody wants their spare toilet rolls exposed to the world do they?) - but no! It is a "bottle" cover. How much better to have a knitted poodle gracing the dining table rather than leaving your Castle Lafite Rothschild labels tastelessly speaking for themselves. [Actually I think it looks like it's designed for the sherry bottle - perhaps to hide the little nip you need to get through the housework.]

Alternatively you can wimp out and knit it as a toy - provided your child is also into retro 1950s toys, (did I mention that as a kid my favourite toy was a poodle ? ... he wasn't knitted though ..... Pom Pom .... ‹closes eyes in reminiscence ›)

[Please note: This has not been knitted up to test the pattern but is provided as per the original. The shapes are very simple and the main effort is in the making up.]

Instructions.

The poodle is knitted mainly in garter stitch with some eyelet rows to carry elastic and drawstring. I think the two methods of assembly have not been quite thought through in the original pattern, so you need to use your common sense and refer to the picture when sewing it together.

Body

With No 8 needles cast on 49 stitches, and knit 2 rows.

Next row: * k1, wf, k2tog; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.

Continue in garter stitch (every row knit) until work measures 7½ inches from the beginning.

Next row: * k5, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [42 sts]
Knit 3 rows.

Next row: * k4, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [35 sts]
Knit 3 rows.

Next row: * k3, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [28 sts]
Knit 3 rows.

Next row: * k2, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [21 sts]
Knit 1 rows.

Next row: K1; * k2tog; repeat from * to end. [11 sts]

Thread wool through remaining stitches, draw up and fasten off securely. [Editor's note: I think there is a bit of an implied error here - this is the neck, so only draw up to the degree that the neck of the bottle will fit...]

Head

Cast on 49 stitches, and knit 3 rows.

Next row: * k5, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [42 sts]
Knit 3 rows.
Next row: * k4, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [35 sts]
Knit 3 rows.
Next row: * k3, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [28 sts]

Next row: * k1, wf, k2tog; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.

Continue without any shaping for 3 inches.

Next row: * k2tog; repeat from * to end. [14 sts]
Next row: Knit.
Next row: * k2tog; repeat from * to end. [7 sts]

Thread wool through remaining stitches, draw up and fasten off securely.

Nose

Cast on 12 stitches, and work 1½ inches in garter stitch.

Next row: * k1, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [8 sts]
Next row: Knit.
Next row: * k2tog; repeat from * to end. [4 sts]

Thread wool through remaining stitches, draw up and fasten off securely.

Pom-Poms

Make 8 pom-poms, 2½ inches in diameter.
Make 2 pom-poms, 1¾ inches in diameter.

Cut 2 pieces of cardboard the diameter of the finished pom-pom; cut a ½ inch diameter hole in the centre. Wind wool over the rings until the centre hole is filled. With a sharp pair of scissors, cut through the wool at the outer edge. With double wool, bind round the centre of the pom-pom between the two pieces of cardboard; tie a knot and fasten off securely. Remove the cardboard. Fluff out and trim.

To Make Up

Join back seam.
Thread elastic through the holes in the bottle cover base and join securely.
Sew one large pom-pom to the back seam at the bottom edge (tail), and sew 4 large pom-poms on the front to represent the legs.
Using small pieces of cotton wool, stuff the nose and sew securely to the front of the head, ½ inch from the holes.
[Editor's note: I think there is a bit of nose-sewing here that is not fully described; so extemporise.]
Embroider the mouth and sew on the 2 buttons to represent the eyes.
Sew a large pom-pom to each side of the face, and on on top of the head. Sew the 2 smaller pom-poms between these (see photo).

Take 4 strands of light coloured wool and thread through holes at neck and secure with a small knot. Tie in a bow.
[Editor's note: This seems to be pictured as being covered with a ribbon tied in a bow - so again I am guessing a little something missing where you need to extemporise. When you draw up the neck remember it has to be able to fit round the neck of the bottle. The head is not stuffed - it is tubular and filled by the neck of the bottle.]

To Make Up the Poodle as a Toy

Follow the instructions for the Bottle Cover.

[Editor's note: After this there are a few inconsistencies which you need to work out as you go.]

Assemble as the bottle cover.

Insert a circle of cardboard 3 inches in diameter into the bottom of the body.
[Editor's note: As far as I can tell, the cardboard will be exposed at the bottom of the toy; you might want to knit a piece of use fabric to cover it before putting in place.]

Make a roll of stuffing 13 inches long and insert this into the base firmly, leaving excess sticking out for the head to fit over.
Run a strong thread through the top edge of the body (neck) and pull up tightly around the excess stuffing, and tie off.

Fluff out the stuffing slightly and fit head over it; pull down and stitch over body.
[Editor's note: As far as I can tell, this excess stuffing sticking out of the neck is pushed up into the head, where the neck of the bottle would have been in the bottle-cover version.]

Materials

4 ozs. Bri-Nylon Double Knitting, plus a short length of contrast wool.

6 inches (15cm) of narrow elastic.

A pair each of No
8 (4mm) "Aero" needles.

2 buttons.

For the toy: cardboard for the base and toy stuffing.

Tension

No tension is given but a normal tension for standard DK on No 8 needles is 22sts x 30 rows to 4 inches over stocking stitch.

Size matters

No size is given but presumably it fits "a bottle".

Abbreviations

wf: "wool forward": make a stitch by bringing the wool to the front of the work and then passing the yarn over the needle when you make the next stitch.

k2tog: (decrease) knit 2 sts together.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.


How to make pom-poms.



This is a different method which I ran across while looking for the simple tutorial above. It's less relevent for making our Poodle maybe but good if you want to make a load of these for a scarf or a necklace (ok - bit dated perhaps - think of your own project!)

December 2012

Nursery Slippers

NurserySlippers.jpg

Toddler slippers for a quickly knitted Christmas gift. The top of each slipper is knitted, and is designed to be attached to a purchased leather sole. You could make your own out of leather (but be prepared to line it - perhaps with quilt batting and fabric, fleece fabric, or a shaped piece of knitting. If you design your own knitted sole you can make it non-slip by sewing on sole-shaped cut-outs from cushioned fabric ("slip-a-grip"); various brand options can be purchased on a roll from kitchen suppliers, or you can buy specialist sewing fabrics for this purpose.
Below I've added a great You Tube link for instructions on how to make your own non-slip soles.

Instructions

Both slippers are worked alike. The following special abbreviation is used throughout the pattern, making a wide ribbed cable.

Tie 5: Insert right-hand needle between 5th and 6th stitches from point of left-hand needle, draw loop through and place on point of left-hand needle, then k2tog, p1, k1, p1, k1.


Both slippers are worked alike,

Slipper (make 2)

With No 11 needles, cast on 45 stitches and work 2½ inches in k1/p1 rib, rows on right side having a k1 at each end.
Break wool.

Slip first and last 6 stitches on safety-pins for heel.

With right side facing, rejoin wool to the centre 33 stitches and with No 9 needles continue in pattern for instep as follows:-

1st row: p4, (rib 5, p5) twice, rib 5, p4.
2nd row: k4, (rib 5, k5) twice, rib 5, k4.

Repeat the last 2 rows once more.

5th row: p4, tie 5, p5, rib 5, p5, tie 5, p.4.
6th row: as 2nd row.

Repeat 1st and 2nd rows twice more.

11th row: p4, rib 5, p5, tie 5, p5, rib 5, p4.
12th row: as 2nd row.

These 12 rows form pattern.

Repeat, them once more, then rows 1-6 inclusive again.

Continue in pattern decreasing 1 stitch at each end of next and following 2 alternate rows: 27 stitches remain.

Now decrease 1 stitch at each end of every row until 15 stitches remain. Cast off.

Join side edges of ribbing to form back seam.

For the heel:
Place the two sets of 6 stitches on a No 11 needle. With No 9
needles and right side facing, work in reversed stocking-
stitch as follows:-

Next row: p twice in 1st Stitch, p to last stitch, p twice in last stitch.
Next row: knit. Repeat the last 2 rows until there are 26 stitches ending with a knit row. Cast off.

Finishing

Pin out patterned part and heel of each slipper and press on wrong side under a damp cloth, avoiding ribbing.
Sew slanting side edges of heel piece along side edge of instep piece as far as they will go without stretching; press seams.
Join back seam.

Pin tops to slipper soles and sew firmly in position.

Materials

2oz Double Knitting yarn in Lipstck Red.

One pair each No 11 (3mm) and No 9 (3¾mm) needles.

A pair of size 8 soles (about 25 or 26 european size).
[Editor's note: You can try a search for "knitted slipper soles". I came up with this one.

Tension

23 stitches by 31 rows to 4 inches over stocking stich on 3¾mm needles

Size matters

Designed "for a toddler" with some flexibility as to the size of sole chosen. For a larger slipper, experiment with thicker yarn and fit to a larger sole.

A word on the wool.

The original yarn recommended was a standard double knitting. Despite the tension being very slightly tighter than usual due to the 3¾mm needles used, I think a slightly heavier weight - an Aran weight perhaps - would be quite acceptable. A tighter fabric for slippers is probably more desirable.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

October 2012

Cloche Cap

ClocheCap.jpg

Charming retro hat with decorative band and buckle.

I learned from the Debbie Bliss Magazine Autumn/Winter 2012 that one of my favourite designers, Louisa Harding, has been facing up, with her husband, to his challenge of being treated for lymphoma. In appreciation for the help of Macmillan nurses, Louisa is taking part in Macmillan's Nepal Hiking Challenge and seems well on her way to raising her goal of £5000.
To help achieve the target She has put together a series of seven knitting patterns called 'Himalayan Hiking Hats'. She will have her photo taken wearing each one of the hats on the first 6 days of the trek. The seventh hat pattern in the series will be knitted 'en route' and photographed on the 7th (last) trekking day.
Download the hat patterns from her site and show your support by sending a donation.

Instructions.

The main hat is knitted in reverse stocking stitch, with the band in garter stitch. The design is intended for a textured yarn.

Crown

Using the 5 No 10 needles, cast on 8 stitches, placing 2 stitches on each of 4 needles.

1st (and every alternate) round: purl
2nd round: knit twice into every stitch. [16 sts]
4th round: * k1 knit twice in next stitch; repeat from * all round. [24 sts]
Mark end of round with a contrast thread, or stitch marker.

6th round: * k2, knit twice in next stitch; repeat from * all round. [32 sts]
8th round: * k3, knit twice in next stitch; repeat from * all round. [40 sts]

Continue increasing 8 stitches thus on every alternate round until there are 36 stitches on each needle. [144 stitches]
Work 7 rounds straight.

Next round: * k16, k2tog; repeat from * all round. [136 sts]
Work 2 rounds straight.
Next round: * k15, k2tog; repeat from * all round. [128 sts]
Work 2 rounds straight.
Next round: * k14, k2tog; repeat from * all round. [120 sts]
Work 2 rounds straight.
Next round: * k13, k2tog; repeat from * all round. [112 sts]
Work 5 rounds straight.

Cast off.

Band

Cast on 16 stitches, and work a strip in garter-stitch (every row knit) 22 inches long - or length required to fit round head with 3 inches to spare. Now decrease 1 stitch at each end of the next and every alternate row until 2 stitches remain; k2tog and fasten off. This forms a point.
Using the wool double, crochet all round the outer edge of the buckle to cover.
[Editor's note: I think this might be trickier than it sounds - either due to the bouclé nature of the yarn or the thickness of the hook you'd need to use. I might be tempted to try a blanket or button-hole stitch around the buckle using the yarn single and a large-eyed darning needle.]

Stitch the cast-on edge of the band to the buckle, then slot the shaped end through the buckle pulling it through until the band fits round the head snugly.
[Editor's note: Again a slight inconsistency in the instructions and the photo here. I don't think it matters if you have a buckle with or without a tongue. If the latter, arrange the size you need and just push the tongue through the knitting. You should catch stitch the band in place, ensuring that it looks as though the end is free, that is, as if you had not stitched it.]

To Make Up

Pin band in position evenly all round crown noting that the purl side of the crown is the right side.
Sew neatly in position stretching band slightly.
Press seam and crown very lightly under a damp cloth using a rolled towel inside hat to keep the shape.

Materials

3 ozs Patons Rimple double knitting in colour Harlequin 1572.

A set of five of No 10 (3¼mm) needles, pointed at both ends.

A 2½ inch buckle.

Crochet hook.

Tension

24 sts to 4 inches.

Size matters

An average hat size.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.


A word on the wool.

Patons Rimple was a softly textured bouclé yarn, (97% wool, 3% nylon), which knitted to a double knitting tension.

This hat is knitted on finer needles than usual so the knitted fabric will be denser and stiffer, giving the hat more body.

There are a few double knitting bouclé yarns available though many tend to be chunky weight. Debbie Bliss seems to have discontinued the Cashmerino Astrakhan but you can still obtain it at some outlets on the internet (and often discounted). Rowan have recently brought out a British Sheep Breeds "fine" bouclé but this still seems to knit up to a chunkier tension. You can try and obtain the right tension with finer needles - and I think this would produce an excellent knitted fabric for the hat - but be warned that knitting bouclé tightly on small needles is very hard work.

I cannot supply the yardage of Rimple, and can only guess that "Harlequin" was a multi-coloured tweed.

June 2012

Baby Shawlette

BabyShawletteFront.jpg

This is so very easy to knit and looks so cute over a (Liberty?) cotton baby frock. No idea how practical it is to keep in place, but it has secure back fastening straps and is perfect as a gift or for that special summer baby occasion.

Instructions

The shawlette is worked in garter stitch (every row knitted) throughout. You start your knitting at the bottom of the back and work up towards the neck, where you divide and complete each front section separately. It is designed to cross over at the front, and button into place at the back.

Using No 12 needles, cast on 50 sts and work in garter stitch for ½ inch (approximately 8-9 rows).

Next row(make eyelets): K6; ** wrn, k2tog; repeat from ** to last 6 sts; k6.
Next row:
Knit.

Start to shape the back as follows:

1st row: K6, wrn; knit to last 6 sts; wrn, k6.
2nd row: Knit

Repeat these two rows, (increasing 2 sts on each alternate row), until there are 115 sts. Your work then measures approximately 5¾ inches from the beginning.

Now start to shape the right front, working each side of the neck separately.

Next row: K6, wrn, k40, turn.
Leave the remaining 69 sts on a stitch holder or spare needle.

Working only on these 47sts:

1st row: Knit.
2nd row: K6, wrn, k2tog; knit to last 8sts; k2tog, k6.

Repeat these two rows, (decreasing 1 stitch on each alternate row), until 15 sts remain.

Next row: K6, wrn, k3tog, k6
Next row: Knit
Next row: Knit to last 8sts; k2tog, k6.

Repeat the last 2 rows until 6 sts remain (your last decrease row will be "k2tog, k5").

Work strap, buy continuing to knit on these 6sts for 2¼ inches.

Next row (make buttonhole): K2, cast off 2, knit 2.
Next row: K2, cast on 2 over those cast off, knit 2.
Next row: K2tog, k2, k2tog.
Next row: K2tog, k2tog.
Next row: K2tog and pull thread through to cast off.

Now pick up the sts left on the spare needle and join yarn to neck edge where you left off. Cast off 23 sts then, start to shape the left front, by knitting to the last 6sts, wrn, k6 [47 sts].

Working only on these 47sts:

1st row: Knit.
2nd row: K6, s1,k1,psso; knit to last 8sts; s1,k1,psso; wrn, k6.

Repeat these two rows, (decreasing 1 stitch on each alternate row), until 15 sts remain.

Next row: K6, s2,k1,pass 2 slipped sts over; wrn, k6
Next row: Knit
Next row: K6, s1,k1,psso; knit to end

Repeat the last 2 rows until 6 sts remain (your last decrease row will be "k5, s1,k1,psso").

Work strap, buy continuing to knit on these 6sts for 2¼ inches, and finishing with a buttonhole as for the right front.

To Make Up

Do not block or press.
Sew in all ends.
Sew buttons to back to attach front straps.

Materials

1 x 40g ball 4ply fingering yarn.

A pair of No 12 (2¾mm or 2½mm ) needles.

2 small buttons.

Tension

30sts x 58rows to 4 ins in over garter stitch (every row knit).

Size matters

To fit 3-6 months (18-19 inch chest).

Abbreviations

wrn: wool round needle. Makes an extra stitch which forms a small pattern hole when knitted on the next row.

k2tog: knit 2 sts together.

s1,k1,psso: slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over; also known as "ssk" (slip, slip, knit).

A word on the wool.

The original yarn was a slightly fluffy 4 ply mohair/acrylic blend.
You could use beautifully soft Debbie Bliss Rialto 4ply, or experiment to make a larger size using Baby Cashmerino (check out with a swatch for both needle size and drape).

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

Here's a view showing you the back.

BabyShawletteBack.jpg

April 2012

Easter Bonnet

AliceBandBonnet3.jpg

This type of bonnet was very popular in the 1950s - at least it was much favoured by Paton and Baldwin, using their Fuzzy Wuzzy angora**. I think, following the 1940s roll, it went with the more modern shorter hairstyles, and was possibly the half-way house to what was essentially the demise of the hat for everyday wear. Anyway - I am sure they explored every possible variation on this basic style.

**Perhaps not the best marketing brand for today's knitters.... However, angora wool is very light weight and was sold in half ounce balls; this gives you the clue that it was relatively expensive, so a tiny little cap - or perhaps bolero - was ideally affordable. (And did I mention fluffy? even I - never allergic to anything - am prone to fits of sneezing when wearing angora).

Note that there are two versions of the bonnet for different yarn weights.

Instructions for the double knitting bonnet

Pattern stitch is worked over 6 rows:

1st row (right side facing): * p3, k3, p3; leave wool forward (wfd), k2tog; repeat from * to last 9 sts; p3, k3, p3.
2nd row: * k3, p1, k1, p1, k3, p2; repeat from * to last 9 sts; k3, p1, k1, p1, k3.
3rd row: * p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3, k2tog, wrn; repeat from * to last 9 sts; p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: as first row.
6th row: as second row.

[Editor's note: The above pattern repeat of 6 rows is as given in the original instructions. If you compare the photo below with my version, you will see the eyelet arrangement is slightly different between the two. I worked (k2tog, wrn) and then (wrn, k2tog) alternately on the right side rows; this does not fit with the 6 row repeat of the mock cables. I have not written out my resulting 12 row repeat for you, but if you want to do this it is quite simple to keep track of the two patterns as you knit, one having a 4 row repeat, and the other, a 6 row repeat. Knit to the correct number of rows overall, and make sure you keep it consistent when you get to the decrease rows. ]

AliceBandBonnet.jpg

To Make:

Cast on cast on 64sts using the knit cast-on method to give a loose edge. Work 9 rows in stocking stitch (one row knit, one row purl), ending with a knit row. Now make the hem for the hair-band casing as follows:

Hem row (purl side facing, which is the right side of the work): Fold the hem so that the cast on edge is aligned at the back of the needle containing your working sts; * knit one stitch on the needle with one loop from the cast on edge; repeat from * to end.
Next row(wrong side facing) : knit.

Now commence the pattern - work the 6 pattern rows five times.

Start the shaping:

31st row (first shaping row): p3, k3, p3; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, p1, k3, p1, p2tog; repeat from * to last 11sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3. [56sts]
32nd row: k3, p1, k1, p1, k3; * p2, k2, p1, k1, p1, k2; repeat from * to last 11sts; p2, k3, p1, k1, p1, k3.
33rd row: p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3; * k2tog, wrn, p2, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p2; repeat from * to last 11sts; k2tog, wrn, p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3.
34th row: as 32nd row.
35th row: p3, k3, p3; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2, k3, p2; repeat from * to last 11sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3.
36th row: as 32nd row.

37th row (second shaping row): p3, k3, p3; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, k3, p2tog; repeat from * to last 11sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3. [48sts]
38th row: k3, p1, k1, p1, k3; * p2, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1; repeat from * to last 11sts; p2, k3, p1, k1, p1, k3.
39th row: p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3; * k2tog, wrn, p1, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p1; repeat from * to last 11sts; k2tog, wrn, p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3.
40th row: as 38th row.
41st row: p3, k3, p3; * leave wfd, k2tog, p1, k3, p1; repeat from * to last 11sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3.
42nd row: as 38th row.

43rd row (third shaping row): p3, k3, p3; * leave wfd, k3tog, k2, sl1, k1, psso; repeat from * to last 11sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3. [40sts]
44th row: k3, p1, k1, p1, k3, p3, k1; * p4, k1; repeat from * twice more; p3, k3, p1, k1, p1, k3.
45th row: p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3; * k2tog, wfd, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso; repeat from * 3 times more; k2tog, wrn, p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3.
46th row: k3, p1, k1, p1, k3; purl to the last 9 sts; k3, p1, k1, p1, k3.

Next row: Cast off 9sts; knit to the last 9sts; cast off 9 and fasten off.
Thread a strand of wool through the remiaing sts, draw up and fasten off.

To Complete

Pin out and press the work lightly on the wrong side with a warm iron over a damp cloth.
Join the cast-off edges together to form the centre back seam.

With the right side of the bonnet facing you, join the wool to one side edge, at the inner edge of the hem (ie do not crochet the ends of the hem together, as you need to thread your plastic hair band into it), and work one row of double crochet all around the neck edge, finishing atthe same position on the opposite side of the front. Draw the edge in slightly as you work.
Turn the work and and work 1dc into each dc of the preceding row.
Run 4 rows of elastic thread through the wrong side of the dc edging and draw up the threads to measure about 11 inches, or more if necessary.

Slip the hair band through the front casing, and then seam the short ends to close it off.

Sew in and neaten all ends.

Materials

Original materials called for: 2 ozs double knitting wool.

One pair of No 7 (4½mm) needles. One No 11 (3mm) crochet hook.

1½ yards elastic thread.

A plastic hair band.

Tension

21 sts and 29 rows to 4 inches.

Size matters

To fit "an average head".
[Editor's note: I suggest that the fit will mainly be controlled by the size of the purchased head band, although I note from the photos that the DK version seems to fit more snugly than the 3-ply.]

Abbreviations

inc: increase by working into the front and back of the next stitch.
k2tog: knit two stitches together.
wrn: wool round needle
wfwd: wool forward
wtb: wool to back
s1: slip one stitch
psso: pass the slipped stitch over

dc: double crochet.
[Editor's note: Remember this is English crochet where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.]

A word on the wool.

Original yarn Sirdar Majestic.

I used Phildar Partner 6 in a lovely red shade, (50% nylon, 25% wool, 25% acrylic).
The stated 2oz required is about 56g. A standard DK 50g ball is usually around 90-100m and this should be sufficient. Partner 6 has 66m/71yds per 50g and I needed more than one 50g ball.
Partner 6 is an Aran weight - almost even chunky - yarn.
Consequently I used No 8 (4mm) needles thinking this would still turn out slightly larger than intended. However this combination produced the required tension spot on - and actually I wish it were a shade larger. It is definitely the incorporated Alice Band that keeps this type of hat firmly on your head.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.



Here is the same bonnet in a finer yarn. Normally, I would say finer yarns make a better result, (I know: "it depends"...). However, I actually prefer the double knit version of this style which seems better proportioned.

AliceBandBonnet2.jpg

Instructions for the 3-ply bonnet

Pattern stitch is worked over 6 rows:

1st row (right side facing): * p5, k3, p5; leave wool forward (wfd), k2tog; repeat from * to last 13sts; p5, k3, p5.
2nd row: * k5, p1, k1, p1, k5, p2; repeat from * to last 13sts; k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
3rd row: * p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5, k2tog, wrn; repeat from * to last 13sts; p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: as first row.
6th row: as second row.

To Make:

Cast on cast on 103sts using the knit cast-on method to give a loose edge. Work 11 rows in stocking stitch (one row knit, one row purl), ending with a knit row. Now make the hem for the hair-band casing as follows:

Hem row (purl side facing, which is the right side of the work): Fold the hem so that the cast on edge is aligned at the back of the needle containing your working sts; * knit one stitch on the needle with one loop from the cast on edge; repeat from * to end.
Next row(wrong side facing) : knit.

Now commence the pattern - work the 6 pattern rows eight times.

Start the shaping:

49th row (first shaping row): p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, p3, k3, p3, p2tog; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5. [93sts]
50th row: k5, p1, k1, p1, k5; * p2, k4, p1, k1, p1, k4; repeat from * to last 15sts; p2, k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
51st row: p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5; * k2tog, wrn, p4, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p4; repeat from * to last 15sts; k2tog, wrn, p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
52nd row: as 50th row.
53rd row: p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p4, k3, p4; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5.
54th row: as 50th row.

55th row (second shaping row): p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, p2, k3, p2, p2tog; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5. [83sts]
56th row: k5, p1, k1, p1, k5; * p2, k3, p1, k1, p1, k3; repeat from * to last 15sts; p2, k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
57th row: p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5; * k2tog, wrn, p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3; repeat from * to last 15sts; k2tog, wrn, p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
58th row: as 56th row.
59th row: p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5.
60th row: as 56th row.

61st row (third shaping row): p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, p1, k3, p1, p2tog; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5. [73sts]
62nd row: k5, p1, k1, p1, k5; * p2, k2, p1, k1, p1, k2; repeat from * to last 15sts; p2, k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
63rd row: p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5; * k2tog, wrn, p2, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p2; repeat from * to last 15sts; k2tog, wrn, p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
64th row: as 62nd row.
65th row: p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2, k3, p2; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5.
66th row: as 62nd row.

67th row (fourth shaping row): p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, k3, p2tog; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5. [63sts]
68th row: k5, p1, k1, p1, k5; * p2, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1; repeat from * to last 15sts; p2, k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
69th row: p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5; * k2tog, wrn, p1, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p1; repeat from * to last 15sts; k2tog, wrn, p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
70th row: as 68th row.
71st row: p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p1, k3, p1; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5.
72nd row: as 68th row.

73rd row (fifth shaping row): p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, k1, k3tog, k1; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5. [53sts]
74th row: k5, p1, k1, p1, k5; * p3, k1; repeat from * to the last 16sts; p3, k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
75th row: p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5; * k2tog, wrn, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso; repeat from * to the last 15sts; k2tog, wrn, p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
76th row: as 74th row.
77th row: p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, k3; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5.

Next row: Cast off 13sts; knit to the last 13sts; cast off 13 and fasten off.
Thread a double strand of wool through the remiaing sts, draw up and fasten off.

To Complete

Press and complete as for the double knitting version of the bonnet.

Materials

Original materials called for: 1oz of 3-ply fingering wool.

One pair of No 11 (3mm) needles.
One No 12 (2¾mm) crochet hook.

1½ yards elastic thread.

A plastic hair band.

Tension

30 sts and 44 rows to 4 inches.

Size matters

To fit "an average head".
[Editor's note: From the photo this bonnet seems to work out larger than the DK version. That is: the gathering or "drawing in" at the neck edge seems to be more pronounced. Normally I would say that the "fine" knitting produces a nicer result than chunkier but I think I prefer the DK version in this case.]

Abbreviations

inc: increase by working into the front and back of the next stitch.
k2tog: knit two stitches together.
wrn: wool round needle
wfwd: wool forward
wtb: wool to back
s1: slip one stitch
psso: pass the slipped stitch over

dc: double crochet.

A word on the wool.

Original yarn Sirdar Majestic.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

January 2012

Isobel's Little Blanket

IsobelsBlanket.jpg

This is small blanket or cot cover made from 12 crochet squares in chunky yarn (so quick to make). It's based the usual granny-square principle, but a very pretty example of it incorporating the central flower motif.

Instructions

There are a couple of new stitches used in this pattern, as well as basic chain, dc, and treble. There is a "cluster" used in making the central flower, and crab stitch for the edging.

Make cluster:

Working all into the same stitch, **yoh, draw through loop **; repeat from ** to ** 4 times (9 loops on hook); yoh, draw loop through all loops on hook; yoh, draw loop through stitch on hook.
[Editor's note: This last stitch is just "1 chain".]

Crab Stitch

Crab stitch is worked exactly as you do double crochet - but from right to left instead of left to right. It seems very awkward but just force yourself to do it; push the hook through the stitch to the right of your needle, pull through a loop, then yoh and pull through both loops on hook.

It creates a very attractive twisted ribbed edge.

There a is you tube extract inserted at end of this item - or go search the web for "crab stitch" for a variety of explanations.

Motif (make 12)

Starting at the centre of the square: using 7mm hook and first contrast, (plum), make 6ch and join in a ring using a slip stitch.

1st round: 8dc into the ring and join with a slip stitch to top of first dc.
2nd round: **1 cluster in first dc, 3ch; 1 cluster in next dc, 1ch **; repeat from ** to ** 3 times more, and join with a slip stitch to top of first st.
Change to second contrast (cream).
3rd round: Insert hook in first 3-chain space and make 2 chain for first treble; **2tr in same space, 3ch; 3tr in same space, 1ch; 3tr in next 1-chain space, 1ch; 1tr in next 3-chain space, ** repeat from ** to ** 3 times more, omitting the very last tr in the repeated sequence, and join with a slip stitch to top of first chains.
Change to third contrast (lime).
4th round: 1 dc **1dc over each of next 3tr, 3dc into next 3-chain space; 1dc over each of next 3tr, 1dc into next 1-chain space; 1dc over each of next 3tr, 1dc into next 1-chain space;**. Repeat from ** to ** 3 times more, and join with a slip stitch to top of first dc.

Fasten off.

This completes the motif.

IsobelsBlanket_detail.jpg

To Make Up

Make 12 squares altogether.

With 7mm hook and 3rd contrast (lime), join 2 squares together; hold right sides together and slip stitch through the back loop of each dc, leaving the front loops exposed as a decorative ridge on the right side (see photos).
[Editor's note: If you can't immediately see what is meant here, try experimenting. There is a loop on each side of a crochet stitch; usually when placing a stitch on top on the next row, you push your hook through both loops, but for some decorative sts, you are asked to use either only the back or only the front loops in order to create a ridge, Whatever you end up doing, just make sure you are consistent, so that you get a nice consistent pattern emerging.]

Join 3 squares in a row, then join the 4 rows together.

Finally, using first contrast (plum) and right side facing, work a row of dc all around the blanket, and work 2 or 3sts into the 4 corner sts, to make it curve properly. Then, keeping the right side facing you, change to a 6mm hook and go back the way you came, working one row of crab stitch right to left.

Sew in all ends.

Block the blanket by pinning it out and dampening; leave to dry. You can press very lightly with a damp cloth - just hold the iron above the cloth so it heats it but do not press down. You want to leave the texture of the stitches in place, so do not press heavily.

Materials

2 x 50g balls of chunky in each of first and second contrast and 1 ball in third contrast.


One No 2 (7mm) and one No 4 (6mm) crochet hook.

Tension

Each square is intended to measure 4¾ inches.

Size matters

To fit cot, pram, or Moses basket.

Abbreviations

yoh: yarn over hook.
ch: chain.
cl: cluster.
dc: double crochet.
tr: treble crochet.
[Editor's note: Remember this is English crochet where dc is equivalent to US single crochet, and tr is equivalent to US double crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.]

A word on the wool.

The original yarn produces a tension of 13sts x 19 rows to 4 ins over stocking stitch. You can substitute an Aran weight yarn worked double throughout, though this is less easy to work with for crochet patterns.

I used Patons Pompero a chunky yarn, knitting to a tension of 16sts x 22 rows to 4 ins, which is thinner, though I used a 7mm hook with it.

Result of my yarn choice is a smaller blanket, requiring only one ball in each colour.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

Crab Stitch

Here is a You Tube item showing how to do crab stitch,
(a picture painting a thousand words and so on).

December 2011

Sideways Stash Socks

HoneycombBedsocks.jpg

Father George: so fond of his bedsocks that they get worn out. [Since he is not bedridden I can only surmise he does not restrict their use to the bedroom!] Hence - by request - here are some more.

The patterned section of the sock is knitted sideways using a variation of a honeycomb stitch; it's an opportunity to use up really small amounts of double knitting yarn. I rotated 4 contrast colours but you could use a different colour for every set of rows; the key is to keep some consistency in the main colour.

Instructions.

The first section of these socks is knitted sideways making a "T" shape where the upright of the "T" is the upper foot, and the cross bar curls around the leg to form the cuff, meeting at the back seam.
The second section knits the heel and then sole of the sock. These two sections are worked on 2 needles.
Then for the toe, you pick up the stitches from the first 2 sections, and knit in the round on 4 needles, and finally you pick up stitches at the top of the sock and knit the welt, also in the round.

First section (knit 2)

Starting at the back leg seam, with main shade (M) cast on 23 sts on 2 needles and knit one row. Commence pattern.

Join in contrasts (C1, C2 etc):
1st row: Using C1, p3 * sl1, p3; repeat from * to end of row
2nd row: Using C1, k3 * sl1, k3; repeat from * to end of row
3rd row: As first row.
4th row: As second row.
5th row: Using main shade (M) purl across all sts.
6th row: Using C2, k1, sl1, * k3, sl1; repeat from * to last st, k1.
7th row: Using C2, p1, sl1, * p3, sl1; repeat from * to last st, p1.
8th row: As 6th row.
9th row: As 7th row.
10th row: Using main shade (M) knit across all sts.

Repeat rows 1-10 using different contrasts, once more.

Next row(wrong side facing): Cast on 40 sts, and then work across them and all sts, as for 1st row of pattern. [63sts]
[Editor's note: If you want a shorter or longer foot length cast on more or fewer stitches here. Reduce or add sts in multiples of 4, which is about ¾ of an inch]

Continue to work the pattern on these 63 sts, working rows 1-10 three times, and then rows 1-4.

Next row(wrong side facing): Using main shade, cast off 40 sts, and purl across remainder. [23sts]

Continue to work the pattern on these 23 sts, working rows 6-10, then rows 1-10 once, times, and then rows 1-4.
Cast off purlwise using main shade (centre back seam).

Second section (heel and sole).

The remainder of the socks are worked entirely in the main shade.

For the heel: with right side of the first section facing, oriented like an upside down "T" pick up 11 sts from each side of the instep:

Pick up and knit 11 sts from the left side first, ending at the cast on edge (which will be the centre back, and then turn the work over and bend round the second side, and pick up 11sts from the right side. The sock cuff now forms a circle with the back seams together, but not yet sewn.

Turn and purl 1 row across these 22 sts.

Next row(right side facing): * Sl1, k1, repeat from * to end.
Next row: Purl

Repeat the last 2 rows 10 times more.

Turn the heel:

Next row: Sl1, k12, k2tog, k1. Turn.
Next row: Sl1, p5, p2tog, p1. Turn.
Next row: Sl1, k6, k2tog, k1. Turn.
Next row: Sl1, p7, p2tog, p1. Turn.

Continue to work short rows and decrease in this way until all sts have been incorporated. [14sts].

Next row(right side facing): Sl1, k13, pick up and knit 13 sts down side of heel. Turn.
Next row: P27, pick up and purl 13 sts down other side of heel. Turn.

Now work the instep decreases and sole:

Next row: K1, sl1, k1, psso; knit to last 3 sts, k2tog k1. Turn.
Next row: Purl.

Repeat the last 2 rows until 22 sts remain.
[Editor's note: if you want to make the sock for a narrower foot circumference then decrease a few more sts here. About 6 sts for an inch.]

Continue to work a further 50 rows to make the sole - upper and lower foot sections should be about the same length.
[Editor's note: if you altered the sock length by casting on more of fewer than 40 sts, then adjust the number of rows you knit here. For every 4 sts different in the first section, allow 5 rows difference in the sole.]

Toe

Now we move to working in the round.

Knit 11 sts on first double-pointed needle, 11sts on second, then with right side facing, using third needle, pick up and knit 24 sts across the toe edge of the first section.
Complete the round, knitting 11 sts from first needle then 11 sts from second. Knit one more round.

Next round: K1, sl1, k1, psso; knit to last 3 sts on third needle, k2tog k1. Complete the round by knitting the 11 sts on each of the first and second needles. [44 sts]

Next round: K1, sl1, k1, psso; knit to last 3 sts on third needle, k2tog k1; on first needle, k1, sl1, k1 psso; knit to end; on second needle, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog k1.
Next round: Knit.

Repeat the last 2 rounds until 16sts remain.
Slip the sts from the second needle on to the first and graft the sts together with those on the third needle.

Making up

Sew seams on each side of the sole, using a flat seam technique (not mattress stitch for example).

Using double pointed needles and main shade, pick up 60-66 sts round top of sock and knit a k3/p3 rib for about 8 rows (or as long as you want), to form the welt. Cast off loosely.

Sew in all ends.

Materials

2 x 50g balls of double knitting yarn, and a variety of left over DK colours.

One pair and one set of four No 8 (4mm) needles, pointed at both ends.

Tension

22 stitches = 4ins

Size matters

Length of foot, 9 inches (adjustable).

Abbreviations

M is main shade (olive).
C are contrasts.

sl1: slip the next stitch

k2tog or p2tog: work 2 sts together to decrease.

psso: pass the slipped stitch over, (also known as "ssk"; effectively you are "knitting 2 together through back loops")

A Word
on the Wool.

I used Phildar Oxygene in olive for the main colour, and a 4 other colours for the contrast - you could have every colour change (15 colours) different if you wanted.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

October 2011

Jacob's Sleeping Bag of Many Colours

JacobsBag.jpg

This is a vintage baby-bag pattern probably intended for babies up to 3 months in age. It's very simple to knit and fastened around the edge with easy poppers. It's tempting to knit this in beautiful, soft, lofty yarns - however, it does need to be washable, if not so very hard wearing.
OK - maybe not so many colours - but so cute!

Instructions

The striped pattern is worked as follows:

1st row: Knit in main shade
2nd - 11th rows: Knit in first contrast
12th row:
Knit in main shade
13th - 22nd rows: Knit in second contrast

These 22 rows are repeated to form the striped pattern.

Body

The body is worked in one piece; you start off knitting short, shaped pieces for the back and front separately then join them both onto one needle. The pattern as written should work out that the stripes match up when you join them together - make sure they do - and you may want to use a circular needle for the 86 stitches in chunky yarn.

Back:

With No 4 (6mm) needles and second contrast (Pink), cast on 25 sts and purl one row.
Then work in striped pattern as above, beginning with 4 rows in pink, 1 row in main (White), 9 rows in first contrast (Sky Blue) and at the same time, shape rows as follows:-

1st row(right side): Cast on 3, knit to end.
2nd row: Cast on 3, purl to end.
3rd row: Cast on 2, knit to end.
4th row: Cast on 2, purl to end.

Change to white yarn for 1 row:
5th row: Cast on 2, knit to end.

Change to blue yarn for 9 rows:
6th row: Cast on 2, purl to end.
7th row: Inc in first st, knit to end.
8th row: Inc in first st, purl to end.
9th row: Inc in first st, knit to end.
10th row: Inc in first st, purl to end.
11th row: Knit
12th row: Inc in first st, purl to end.
13th row: Knit
14th row: Inc in first st, purl to end. [45 sts]

Change to white yarn for 1 row:
15th row: Knit.

Change to pink yarn and work in sts for 5 rows starting with a purl row.
Leave the sts on a stitch holder or spare needle.
[Editor's note: You have ended with right side facing about to start your 6th row in pink yarn.]

Front:

With No 4 (6mm) needles and first contrast (Sky Blue), cast on 23 sts and purl one row.
Then work in striped pattern as above, beginning with 6 rows in blue contrast, 1 row in main (White), and at the same time, shape rows as follows:-

1st row(right side): Cast on 3, knit to end.
2nd row: Cast on 3, purl to end.
3rd row: Cast on 2, knit to end.
4th row: Cast on 2, purl to end.
5th row: Cast on 2, knit to end.
6th row: Cast on 2, purl to end.

Change to white yarn for 1 row:
7th row: Inc in first st, knit to end.

Change to pink yarn:
8th row: Inc in first st, purl to end.
9th row: Knit
10th row: Inc in first st, purl to end.
11th row: Knit
12th row: Inc in first st, purl to end. [41 sts]

[Editor's note: You have ended with right side facing about to start your 6th row in pink yarn.]

Right side facing, continuing in pink yarn, knit 41sts from front, and then 45 sts from back (stitches on holder). [86 sts]

Continue straight until work measures 20 inches (51cm) - (measure the back segment), ending with a wrong side row.
[Editor's note: This is approximately 96-98 rows from start of back. End after 5 rows in colour blue with right side facing to begin 6th row in blue.]

Right side facing, tie coloured thread or place marker, between the 41st and 42nd sts and between the 84th and 85th sts.

Next row (right side facing): Cast off 4sts, work to end, and increase (cast on) 3 sts. [85sts]
Next row: Purl.

[Editor's note: You are now about to start the raglan shaping on the front, having completed 7 rows in colour blue with right side facing to begin 8th row in blue.]

Next row(right side facing and keeping striped sequence correct): Cast off 3 sts, k 33 (34sts on needle). Turn, leaving remaining 48sts on a spare needle.

2nd row: Cast off 2 sts, purl to end. [32sts]
3rd row: Cast off 3sts, knit to end. [29sts]

Change to white yarn for 1 row:
4th row: Cast off 2 sts, purl to end. [27sts]

Change to pink yarn for 10 rows:
5th row(and every following knit row up to and including row 13): Cast off 2 sts, knit to end.
6th row(and every following purl row, up to and including row 14): Decrease 1 stitch, purl to end. [12sts]

Change to white yarn for 1 row:
15th: Decrease 1 stitch, work to end. [11sts]

Change to blue yarn for rest of front:
16th -23rd rows (every row): Decrease 1 stitch, work to end. [3sts]
24th row (wrong side facing): Purl (no shaping).
25th row: Decrease 1 stitch, knit to end. [2sts]

The front should now measure 4¾ins (12cm) from beginning of raglan shaping, and 2 sts remain.
Cast off.

Back raglan shaping:

With right side facing, take up 43sts of the back and leave the remaing 5 sts at the end of the row on a holder.
[Editor's note: You are now about to start the raglan shaping on the back, having completed 7 rows in colour blue with right side facing to begin 8th row in blue.]

Keeping striped sequence correct work as follows: cast off 2 sts at the beginning of the next 6 rows, and one stitch at the beginning of the next 16 rows.
Cast off remaining 15 sts.

With right side facing, take up the remaining 5 sts on the holder, and keeping striped sequence correct work as follows:
[Editor's note: right side facing to begin 8th row of pattern in blue.]

1st row (right side facing): Cast off 2 sts, knit to end.
2nd row: Increase (cast on) 3sts, purl to end.
3rd row: Cast off 2 sts, knit to end.

Change to white yarn for 1 row:
4th row: Increase (cast on) 3sts, purl to end.

Change to pink yarn for 10 rows:
5th and every alternate row until row 13: Decrease 1 st, knit to end.
6th and every alternate row until row 12: Increase (cast on) 3sts, purl to end.
14th row: Cast off 2 sts, purl to end.

Change to blue yarn to complete:
15th - 22nd row (every row): Decrease 1 st, work to end.
23rd row: Knit
24th row:
Decrease 1 st, purl to end.
25th row: Knit
26th row: Decrease 1 st, purl to end.

The work should now measure 4¾ins (12cm) from beginning of raglan shaping, and 2 sts remain.
Cast off.

Here's a photo of what it looks like (Figure 1):

 

Sleeves:

With No 6 (5mm) needles and main shade, cast on 26sts. and work 4 rows in k1/p1 rib, ending with a wrong side row.

Change to No 4 (6mm) needles and striped stocking stitch starting with 1 row of main shade (White). Then work in blue as follows:

2nd - 10th row: Stocking stitch in blue yarn
11th row: Knit in blue increasing 1 stitch at each end of the row. [28sts]

12th row: Purl one row in white.

13th - 20th row: Stocking stitch in blue yarn
21st row: Knit in blue increasing 1 stitch at each end of the row. [30sts]
22nd row: Purl one row in blue.

23rd row: Knit one row in white.

Work 7 rows straight in blue. Work measures 7ins (18cm), ending with right side facing to start raglan shaping.
[Editor's note: Make sure that the pattern sequence matches that of back and front at start of raglan shaping.]

Shape raglan by casting off 3sts at the beginning of the next 2 rows, 1st at each end of every following 3rd row, twice, 6 sts remain.

Cast off.

Hood

With No 4 (6mm) needles and first contrast, cast on 17 sts and work in striped pattern starting with 3 rows of the first contrast.
Continue following the striped sequence until work measures until work measures 6¾ins (17cm), ending with wrong side row, and 6 rows of second contrast.

Cast on 22sts at the beginning of the next right side row. [39 sts]

Continue straight until work measures until work measures 11½ins (29cm), ending with wrong side row, and 2 rows of second contrast.

Cast off 22sts at the beginning of the next right side row. [17 sts]

Continue straight until work measures until work measures 18ins (46cm), ending with wrong side row, and 2 rows of first contrast.

Cast off.

Here's a photo showing how the hood looks (Figure 2):

 

Front and Hood Band:

With No 6 (5mm) needles and main shade, cast on 211sts and work 4 rows in k1/p1 rib, arranged as follows:

1st row: K2 * p1, k1, repeat from * to last stitch; k1.
2nd row: P2 * k1, p1, repeat from * to last stitch; p1.

End with a wrong side row.

Next row: Knit and leave sts on a holder.

To Make Up

Sew up sleeve seams, and sew raglan seams together.
The left sleeve front seam is from F to Sl and the back seam is from G to Sl; the 6 cast-off sts of the sleeve head sits between F and G (refer back to Figure 1); likewise the right sleeve is set in H-Sr and A-Sr, and the right sleeve head sits between H and A.

Sew up hood seams, bringing together points G and H to make the hood shape as shown in Figure 2 and then sew the back of the hood to the back neck of the body between points G and H in Figure 1.
Sew the left side of the hood from G to F across top of sleeve head and then across to E ending about an inch away from the point E.
Sew the right side of the hood from H to A across top of sleeve head and then a further 2 inches or so down towards B.

With No 6 (5mm) hook and main shade work 2 rows dc along edge of sleeping bag back from E to D and all around to C (refer back to Figure 1), working tightly across the bottom of the back section so that it is slightly gathered and curls up to form the bottom of the bag.
[Editor's note: You also need to work tightly and gather up the corner between E and D near Sl in figure 1.]

Here's a photo of the bottom section of the back of the bag (Figure 3):

Sew on front and hood band stitch by stitch from C all around to A and then around edge of hood from A to E fitting the edge of the band into the corner by the edge of the hood, at point E.

Sew on snap fasteners evenly from C to D to E on right side of work and from A to B to C on wrong side edge of front.

Press all seams heartily. (That is: carefully with a damp cloth).

Sew on decorative buttons if required.

Materials

3 x 50g balls chunky yarn in main colour, (this is the colour of the edging and narrow stripes), and 4 balls each in 2 contrast collours.

A pair each of No 6 (5mm) and a No 4 (6mm) needles.
One No 6 (5mm) crochet hook.

10-12 x 17mm snap fasteners

9 optional decorative buttons.

Tension

13sts x 19 rows to 4 ins in over stocking stitch.

Size matters

Width all round: 25 ins, (64cm); Length from back neck: 25½ ins (65cm).

Abbreviations

dc: double crochet.
[Editor's note: Remember this is English double crochet where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.]

A word on the wool.

The chunky yarn knits to a tension of tension 13sts x 19 rows to 4 ins over stocking stitch.
You can substitute an Aran weight yarn knitted double throughout, (check your tension with a swatch).

I used King Cole Comfort Chunky (100g balls) - 2 balls of each in colours: soft pink, ice, and white.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

December 2010

Winter Wonder Hat

WinterWonderHat6.jpg

This is a very flattering hat - speaking as one who has difficulty with hats, which always leads to sartorial dilemmas in weather such as we have in the UK at the moment. However, not only flattering and warm, but amazingly speedy to knit, which can be very useful at this time of year. I completed it in one afternoon.

Instructions.

The main part of the hat is a simple six-row pattern where you increase at the beginning and decrease at the end of every alternate row to create the diagonal effect. At the same time you alternate 3-row bands of stocking stitch and reverse sticking stitch.

Side

Cast on 20sts.
[Editor's note: I cast on in waste wool, and when I had completed the 12 patterns (see below) I grafted the sts together instead of seaming.]

1st row: Knit
2nd row: P2tog, purl to the last stitch, purl twice in the last stitch.
3rd row: Knit
4th row: K2tog, knit to the last stitch, knit twice in the last stitch.
5th row: Purl
6th row: K2tog, knit to the last stitch, knit twice in the last stitch.

These 6 rows form the pattern.
Continue until 12 complete patterns have been worked from the start. Cast off.
[Editor's note: I did not cast off but grafted the sts to the cast on row by removing the waste wool and unpicking my first knit row, using this yarn tail to graft. This makes a perfect join.]

Brim

With right side facing, pick up and knit 72sts along one edge of the side piece - that is 3 sts to each knit and purl stripe.
[Editor's note: As I had already seamed the side piece into a tube shape, I used a circular needle to pick up the 72sts and knit the brim.]

Work 10 rows in k1/p1 rib, and then cast off in rib.

Join side piece and brim neatly with a flat seam.
[Editor's note: If you have not already grafted the side together.....]

Press seam lightly.

Crown

Cast on 14sts, and work in stocking stitch, starting with a purl row (this is right side of work), and increasing at each end of the first and every alternate row until there are 28 sts.

Knit one row.

Then continue, decreasing at each end of next and every following alternate row until 14sts remain.

Cast off.

To Make Up

Pin crown in position to side of hat on wrong side, so that purl side of crown is on the outside. Back stitch in position very neatly on wrong side with a tailored seam
Press seam lightly on the right side using a damp cloth.

Fold ribbed brim in half to wrong side and slip stitch in position round lower edge.

Place on head.
Admire.

Wrap in Christmas paper. Put under tree.

Materials

Original materials called for: 2 (2 oz) hanks Patons Big Ben Knitting in white.
Sample shown uses some handspun yarn.

A pair of No 2 (7mm) needles.

Tension

12 sts to 4 inches.

Size matters

To fit an average sized head.

Abbreviations

Increase: increase by knitting into front and back of the next stitch.
k2tog: (decrease) knit 2 sts together.
p2tog: (decrease) purl 2 sts together.

A word on the wool.

Big Ben was quite a novelty bulky wool in its time. There were no substitutes short of knitting several strands of thinner yarn together to make the right tension (as I did with my handspun).
These days we have a number of bulky wools to try; the hat is fairly forgiving as the knit and purl stripes are stretchy like ribbing.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

WinterWonderHat5.jpg

Handspun Yarn

I bought some Spelsau fleece at Woolfest in 2009; there was a workshop on knitting direct from the fleece but I intended to spin my sample. I made a 2 ply yarn which was softer than I had expected, but kempy (as I had not attempted to remove the coarser fibres). There was only a small amount - I did not measure the yardage, but I started with 100g, the yarn was chunky weight, and I knitted 2 strands of yarn together by combining it with an aran-weight handspun merino/silk blend to achive the bulky weight required. As you can see, the fleece was a lovely combination of natural grey tones.
The 100g sample was sufficient to knit the side and brim of the hat, but not the crown - I spun some of the coarser fibre from my Leicester Longwool fleece and combined that with the merino/silk as before to get the right yarn weight and drape, (quite a firm knitted fabric).

The description of the Spelsau fleece is as follows (taken from the reference above):

The Spaelsau is a direct ancestor to the Old Norwegian Sheep.They were tough sheep supplying their masters with meat, milk, wool, skin - even the sails that carried the ships over the oceans were made of their wool. Today, a thousand years later, the wool of the Spaelsau still consists of a rough cover to protect against the wind and the rain, and under this a much softer layer close to the skin as protection against the cold.
The rocky Norwegian west coast is Spaelsau country. On a few isolated isles among the skerries off the coast you still find Old Norwegian Sheep living wild.

July 2010

Simple Carry-All Tote

CarryAllTote.jpg

A minimalist 1960s design "carry-all" bag. The sides are meant to be rigid and incorporate cardboard (or plastic) supports. Yet another perfect project bag.

Instructions

Cast on 54 stitches. Work in bands of garter stitch (every row knit) and stocking stitch (knit one row, purl one row) as follows:

1st band: 3 inches in garter stitch (20 rows)
2nd band: 2 inches in stocking stitch (10 rows)
3rd band: 2 inches in garter stitch (14 rows)
4th band: 2 inches in stocking stitch (10 rows)
5th band: 2 inches in garter stitch (14 rows)

Place markers at each end of the last row.

[Editor's note: You are about to knit the base of the bag.]
Now work 6 inches in garter stitch, placing markers at each end of the last row.
[Editor's note: You have finished the base and are about to knit the other side of the bag.]

Now work back of bag to match front, ie as 5th to 1st band in this order. Cast off loosely.

Side panels

(Make two the same) cast on 22sts, and work in bands of garter stitch and stocking stitch as for front.

Cast off.

Handles

(Make two the same) cast on 8sts and work 13 inches in garter stitch.

Making up

Press pieces lightly on the wrong side.
Cut lining to fit inside bag allowing ½ inch extra for turnings. Cut 3 pieces of cardboard to fit side panels and base of bag.
Join short edge of side panels to base between markers then join side seams.
Stitch cardboard in position inside the bag.
[Editor's note: I used plastic canvas (7 count) for support when lining the bag. It seems ideal in that you can sew it together to make the boxy shape and also catch stitch it to the knitting without undue distortion. The picture also shows that I used a fabric base for my bag - see "adapting the bag".]

Join lining and place inside the bag with seams inside.

Back the handles with petersham ribbon, then sew to top of bag 2½ inches from side seams.

Turn in raw edges at top of lining and slip-stitch hem neatly in position.

A Word on the Wool.

I substituted 100g balls (each 75m/81yards) Debbie Bliss Cashmerino super chunky in Leaf green (colour 16022), knitted on number 5½mm needles, and this took double the stated requirement of the original yarn. I think you would require at least 5 balls of this wool to make the bag as written.

I favoured a plain colour but the simplicity of the pattern would probably suit wilder colours.

Debbie Bliss Cashmerino is a rather high quality smooth wool (it was on sale). As the size of a bag is not critical, substitute any superchunky with good results (checking your tension). It is suggested to support the sides with cardboard, but it may also be a good idea to use a smaller needle size than normally recommended for the yarn, so that the knitted fabric is firm - note that I did not do this.

Adapting the Bag.

As I used sale wool, I had only 4 x 100g balls, and in consequence I adapted the bag significantly to make it work.

I made fabric handles and a fabric base (6 inches in length and matching the width of the bag).

The handles are robust webbing covered in fabric. I sewed the handles firmly to the plastic canvas side supports - so the handles and the plastic canvas lining will take all the weight of the bag contents.
I used dental floss (very strong) for sewing the bag handles on to the canvas - and also for sewing the canvas sides and base together.

I made the base using plastic canvas (7 count) cut to size, and covered with some wadding plus the fabric, and then quilted through all layers, using the canvas as my guide.

I machine sewed the sides of the bag to the base before hand sewing the knitted pieces up the sides using mattress stitch from the outside of the bag.

Finally, in case you are tempted to try this as a felted bag - be warned: felting garter stitch produces different results from stocking stitch and your bag may end up a funny shape - or funnier than you intended....
Happy improvising!

Materials

Original pattern calls for 6 x 50g balls of Patons Camelot which was a bouclé yarn (in colour Corncob). See "a word on the wool".
I recommend planning on at least 400-500 yards.

One pair of number 7 (4½mm) needles.

Fabric for lining.
Petersham ribbon or webbing to line handles.

Cardboard or plastic canvas to support the sides.

Tension

Original tension 15sts x 21rows to 4 inches (10cm) on No 7 (4½mm) over stocking stitch.

[My tension using Debbie Bliss yarn and number 5 (5½mm) needles is 14sts x 20rows to 4 inches over stocking stitch.]

Size matters

Original bag is approximately 14in by 11in and 6in deep at the sides.


Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

June 2010

World Cup Fever

SportSocks.jpg

As the nail-biting tournament in South Africa dominates this month, here we have: 1940s sport socks.
I thought they were nicely in England's colours, but not exactly football socks -
I think they mean a nice decorous sport like tennis, don't you?
Red and white is the original colour scheme from the 1940s. (Possibly the original did not include quite such a Dayglo shade of red.) However, the pattern seems vaguely Scandinavian and wintery to me - I could see them perhaps in Christmas colours of a more muted red with green.

Meanwhile... Ingerland, Ingerland, Ingerland...

Instructions.

Starting at top with the cuff, using the main colour, cast on 64 stitches on three needles (21,22, 21).
[Editor's note: I recommend using one size larger needles than you use for the plain portion of the sock, as Fair Isle technique tends to pull the tension a little tighter.]
Join in a circle, being careful not to twist the stitches, and knit 2 rounds.
[Editor's note: To avoid the cuff curling up so much, I actually did one row purl then one row knit.]
Then work in the cuff pattern as follows (there is a chart at the end of the section):

3rd Round: * k1 contrast (C), k1 main (M); repeat from * to end of round.
4th Round: * k1 M, k1C; repeat from * to end of round.
5th and 6th Round: knit all round in M.
7th Round: * k1C, k2M, k2C, k2M, k3C, k2M, k2C, k2M; repeat from * to end of round.
8th Round: k2C, * k2M, k2C, k2M, k1C, k2M, k2C, k2M, k3C; repeat from * all round, ending k1C.
9th Round: * k1M, k2C, k2M, k2C, k3M, k2C, k2M, k2C; repeat from * to end of round.
10th Round: k2M, *k2C, k2M, k2C, k1M, k2C, k2M, k2C, k3M; repeat from * all round, ending k1M.
11th - 14th Rounds: Repeat 7th to 10th rounds.
15th Round: * k1C, k2M, k2C, k7M, k2C, k2M; repeat from * to end of round.
16th Round: as 8th round.
17th Round: * k1M, k2C, k4M, k3C, k4M, k2C; repeat from * to end of round.
18th Round: as10th round.
19th Round: * k1C, k4M, k2C, k3M, k2C, k4M; repeat from * to end of round.
20th Round: as 8th round.
21st Round: as 7th round.
22nd and 23rd Rounds: knit all round in M.
24th and 25th Rounds: repeat 3rd and 4th rounds.
26th and 27th Rounds: knit all round in M.

This completes the cuff.

Break colour C and continue in main colour only.
[Editor's note: Change to smaller needles here.]

Turn the work inside out to make a fold-over cuff and start to work the rounds in the opposite direction.

Work in k2, p2 rib for 3 inches [Editor's note: about 30 rows.], decreasing 8 stitches in the last round only, by knitting together every 7th and 8th stitch.

Next Round: k2tog, knit to last 2 stitches, k2tog. [54 stitches]

Now work in stocking-stitch (knit every round) for 2 inches.
[Editor's note: about 20 rows.]

Heel

Knit 13 stitches of first needle on to third needle (this is the heel needle), then turn and purl back 26 stitches; divide the remaining 28 stitches equally onto the other two needles. Work back and forth over heel needles as follows:

1st Row: slip 1 stitch knitwise, knit across remaining stitches.
2nd Row: slip 1 stitch purlwise, purl across remaining stitches.
Repeat these last 2 rows alternately until piece measures 2 inches.
[Editor's note: I recommend knitting 26 rows.]

Next Row (right side facing): knit across first 16 stitches, k2tog; turn.

Next Row: p7, p2tog; turn.
Next Row: k7, k2tog; turn.
Repeat the last 2 rows alternately until 8 stitches remain on heel needle.

Next Round: needle 1: knit across heel needle, then pick up 14 stitches down left side of heel; needle 2: knit across next two, needles (thus transferring these stitches on to one needle); needle 3: pick up 14 stitches across other side of heel and k4, from needle 1.

Hereafter, work in rounds of stocking stitch but, on every other round, k2tog at end of first needle, and (s1, k1, psso) at beginning of third needle until 54 stitches remain.

Work straight until piece measures 2 inches less than that required for overall foot length.

[Editor's note: This was about 50 rows for my UK size 4 foot. (EU 37, US 6½.]

Toe

There should be 13 stitches on first needle, 28 on the second needle, and 13 on the third needle. End of round is centre of sole. Work 1 round, decreasing at each end of second needle, then one round straight.

Now there are 13 stitches on first needle, 26 on the second needle, and 13 on the third needle.

Next Round: knit to within 3 stitches of the end of the first needle, k2tog, k1; on second needle, k1, (s1, k1, psso), knit to within last 3 stitches, then k2tog, k1; on third needle, k1, (s1, k1, psso), knit to end of round.
Work 1 round straight.

Repeat the last 2 rounds until 16 stitches remain.
Transfer the stitches on to two needles, having 8 stitches on each needle and divided so that sole lies flat.

Graft the stitches together.

Making up

Sew in all ends. Fold down cuff.

Materials

3ozs Patons Real Shetland Wool.
[2 ozs main shade and 1oz contrasting shade. Original uses white and scarlet].

A set of four No 11 needles, pointed at both ends.

Tension

30 stitches = 4ins

Size matters

Length of foot, 9 inches (adjustable).

Abbreviations

M is main shade (white).
C is contrast (red).

psso: pass the slipped stitch over, (also known as "ssk"; effectively you are "knitting 2 together through back loops").

A Word
on the Wool.

The recommended wool was Patons Real Shetland Wool.

I used Cygnet Wool-Rich 4ply. I chose this yarn as it seemed fine enough to achieve the required tension. I worked mainly on No 12 needles (one size smaller than specified) using No 11s for the Fair Isle section. However I think a conventional 4 ply at 28sts to 4 inches would make a better fabric.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

April 2010

Little Raglan Reefer

RaglanReefer.jpg

Here is a cute little knitted reefer for a small child (6-24months). It dates from pre 1960s where children's knitwear was not inspiring, but as soon as I saw this I wanted to make it - I am a sucker for any nautical theme, especially for kids (and dolls...)

Instructions.

This pattern is given for 2 size options - the instructions for the larger size are blue bold type in curly brackets.

Back

With No 10 (3¼mm) needles cast on cast on cast on 55{61} sts and work rib as follows:
1st rib row: K2; *p1, k1; repeat from * to last st, k1.
2nd rib row: *K1, p1; repeat from * to last st, k1.
Repeat these 2 rows 4 times, then 1st row once.

12th rib row: Rib 3{6}, (increase in next st, rib 6) 7 times, increase in next st, rib to end. [63{69}sts]

Change to No 8 (4mm) needles and proceed in cable pattern as follows:

1st row (right side facing): K9{10}; p1, k4, p1; k11{13}; (p1, k4, ) twice, p1; k11{13}; p1, k4, p1; k9{10}.
2nd row: K1, purl to the last st, k1.
3rd row: K9{10}; p1, C2F, p1; k11{13}; p1, C2F, p1; p1, C2B, p1; k11{13}; p1, C2B, p1; k9{10}.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: as first row.
6th row: as second row.
These 6 rows form the pattern.

Continue in pattern until you have completed row 28{32}.

Shape raglan: (keep continuity of pattern as you work these rows).

[Editor's note: you should be about to begin Row 5 of the pattern sequence for the smaller size and Row 3 (a cable row) for the larger size.]

Next row: Cast off 3sts, work to end.
Next row: Cast off 3sts, work to end.
Next row: K1, s1, k1, psso, work to last 3sts, k2tog, k1.
Next row: K1, purl to the last st, k1.

Repeat last 2 rows 18{20} times, [19{21}sts]
Cast off.

Front

With No 10 (3¼mm) needles cast on cast on cast on 55{61} sts and work rib for the first 11 rows as you did for the back.

12th rib row: Rib 3{6}, (increase in next st, rib 7) 6 times, increase in next st, rib to end. [62{68}sts]

Change to No 8 (4mm) needles and proceed as follows:

1st row (right side facing): K9{10}; p1, k4, p1; k8{9}; (p1, k1, ) 8{9} times; k1.

Turn and continue working on these 40{44}sts to make the left front (these instructions are intended for a boy - see editors note below) and slip remaining 22{24} sts on to a stitch holder and leave to work later.

[Editor's note: If you want to make this for a girl - maybe in white? - then you will perhaps want to reverse these instructions by working the first 22{24} sts, casting on 20sts and working on these 40{44} sts as written, omitting the button holes. Pick up the rest of the sts to work the right front - and don't forget to work the buttonholes on the right front!]

2nd row: (K1, p1) 9{10} times; purl to the last st, k1.

[Editor's note: The centre panel on each of the front pieces is worked in double moss stitch, and I found it convenient to put a stitch marker after I had worked the first 18{20} sts of row 2, to show the limit of this section.]

3rd row: K9{10}; p1, C2B, p1; k7{8}; * p1, k1; repeat from * to end.
4th row: K2, (p1, k1) 8{9} times; purl to the last st, k1.
5th row (on which buttonholes are worked): K9{10}; p1, k4, p1; k8{9}; p2tog, yrn, * p1, k1; repeat from * to last 3 sts; yfwd, k2tog, k1.
6th row: as second row.
7th row: K9{10}; p1, k4, p1; k7{8}; * p1, k1; repeat from * to end.
8th row: as 4th row.
9th row: K9{10}; p1, C2B, p1; k8{9}; * p1, k1; repeat from * to last st, k1.
10th row: as second row.
11th row: as 7th row.
12th row: as 4th row.

Keeping cable and moss stitch panel correct throughout, work 16{20} rows, working buttonholes as before on the 9th of these rows (row 21 for both sizes).

Shape raglan: (keep continuity of pattern across the cables and the centre moss stitch panel as you work these rows).

Next row: Cast off 3sts, work to end.
Next row: Work across in pattern to the last st, k1.
Next row: K1, s1, k1, psso, work to end.
Next row: Work across in pattern to the last st, k1.

Repeat last 2 rows 10{11} times, [26{29}sts]
Next row: K1, s1, k1, psso, work to end.
Next row: Cast off 5sts, work across in pattern to the last st, k1.
Next row: K1, s1, k1, psso, work to end, and cast on 5 sts.
[Editor's note: This creates the jacket-style revere].

** Keeping continuity of the pattern, continue to decrease at the armhole edge as before until 18{20} sts remain of the moss stitch panel.
Work a further 16{18} rows straight in moss stitch as set.
Cast off.

Completing the other side to make the right front:

Slip the sts from the stitch holder on to a No 10 needle, point facing centre of work (right side facing you), and cast on 18{20}sts. [40{44}sts].
Change to No 8 needles and proceed as follows:

1st row (right side facing): K2; (p1, k1) 8{9} times; k7{8}; p1, k4, p1; k9{10}.
2nd row: K1, purl to the last 18{20} sts; (p1, k1) 9{10} times.
3rd row: (K1, p1 ) 9{10} times; k7{8}; p1, C2F, p1; k9{10}.
4th row: K1, purl to the last 18{20} sts; (k1, p1) 8{9} times; k2.
5th row: as first row.
6th row: as second row.
7th row: (K1, p1 ) 9{10} times; k7{8}; p1, k4, p1; k9{10}.
8th row: as 4th row.
9th row: K2; (p1, k1) 8{9} times; k7{8}; p1, C2F, p1; k9{10}.
10th row: as second row.
11th row: as 7th row.
12th row: as 4th row.

Keeping cable and moss stitch correct throughout, work 17{21} more rows, thus finishing at side edge.

Shape raglan: (keep continuity of pattern across the cables and the centre moss stitch panel as you work these rows).

Next row (wrong side facing): Cast off 3sts, work to end.
Next row: Work across in pattern to the last 3 sts, k2tog, k1.
Next row: K1, work to end.

Repeat the last 2 rows 10{11} times, [26{29}sts]

Next row: Cast off 5sts, work across in pattern to the last 3 sts, k2tog, k1.
Next row: K1, work to end, cast on 5 sts.

Complete to match the left side of front, working from ** to end.

Right sleeve:

Using No 10 needles, cast on 32{34}sts. Work 13{15} rows in k1, p1 rib.

Next row: Rib 3{4}; (increase in next st, rib 4) 5 times; increase in next st, rib to end. [38{40}sts]

Change to No 8 needles and proceed in stocking stitch with cable panels set as follows:

1st row (right side facing): K3{3}; (p1, k4, p1, k7{8}) twice; p1, k4, p1; k3{3}.
2nd row: K1, purl to the last st, k1.
3rd row: K3{3}; (p1, C2B, p1, k7{8}) twice; p1, C2B, p1; k3{3}.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: as first row.
6th row: as second row.
These 6 rows form the pattern.

Continue in pattern as on last 6 rows, increasing 1 st at both ends of next and every following 6th row, until there are 50{54}sts; work the extra sts in stocking stitch.
Then work 3{7} rows straight before starting the raglan decreases.

Shape raglan by working rows as you did for the back:

Next row: Cast off 3sts, work to end.
Next row: Cast off 3sts, work to end.
Next row: K1, s1, k1, psso, work to last 3sts, k2tog, k1.
Next row: K1, purl to the last st, k1.

Repeat last 2 rows 18{20} times, [6{6}sts]
Cast off.

Right sleeve:

Work as for the right sleeve, but working C2F instead of C2B.

[Editor's note: The sleeves are identical apart from the way the cables twist, and obviously you can choose to sew them into the Reefer in whatever orientation you prefer.]

To Make Up

Block each piece from the wrong side, pressing very lightly using a warm iron and a damp cloth, omitting the ribbing.

Join side, raglan, and sleeve seams using a flat seam.
Stitch the collar into position across the sleeve tops and back of the neck, joining the 20 cast-off sts together at the centre back.

Stitch down the 20 cast-on stitches at the waist on the inside.
Attach buttons to match buttonholes.
Press seams lightly.

Materials

Original materials called for: 3{4} ozs Patons Quickerknit Baby (wool or bri-nylon).
Sample shown (larger size) used 4 x 50g balls Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino in navy blue.

A pair each Nos 8 and 10 (4mm and 3¼mm) needles.

Four gold coloured buttons (mine are inexpensive plastic buttons with anchor design).

AnchorButton.jpg

Tension

24 sts and 32 rows to 4 inches on No 8 needles. You may need to use a smaller needle to get the right tension using the Baby Cashmerino.

Size matters

Chest 20{22} ins. Length, 9½{10½} ins. Sleeve seam, 6¾{} ins.

Abbreviations

C2F: "cable 2 front". Slip 2sts on to a cable needle, leave at front of work, knit 2sts, then knit 2sts from cable needle.

C2B: "cable 2 back". Slip 2sts on to a cable needle, leave at back of work, knit 2sts, then knit 2sts from cable needle.

Increase: increase by knitting into front and back of the next stitch.

k2tog: (decrease) knit 2 sts together.

s1,k1,psso: (decrease) slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over, or "ssk", slip, slip, knit.

yrn/yfwd: yarn round needle / yarn forward.
Makes an extra stitch which forms a buttonhole when knitted on the next row.

 

A word on the wool.

I believe "quicknit" wools evolved as a compromise yarn for baby designs. They were half way between traditional DK and 4 ply; Phildar marketed Pronostic (a synthetic) which was much used for their baby patterns, being hard wearing and practical.
These days there are many yarn weight variations without rigid adherence to specific tension schemes, and so light worsted weights are much more common than when this pattern first appeared.

Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino is one such yarn being of superb quality, highly practical, and knitting to this convenient gauge for baby knitwear.
I used the No 8 needles as specified in the pattern, and produced a fairly loose fabric; I think the yarn is better suited to No 9 or 10 needles (3¾ mm - 3¼ mm).

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

WilliaminReefer1.jpg

WilliaminReefer2.jpg

RaglanReeferB&W.jpg

February 2010

Fringed Yoke

Knitted in a light weight yarn and originally designed in the 1950s to wear under or over a sweater with a lower neckline. The original is a "fringed cable yoke" (in case you want to show it off over the sweater) but I have omitted the fringing; I wear it as a convenient alternative to a scarf. The yarn I used is more a 4ply than a 3ply weight so my version is very slightly bulkier and longer than the original.

Instructions.

Cables are worked as follows:

Cable 8: Slip next 4sts. onto a cable needle and leave at back of work; k4, then k4 from cable needle.
Cable 7: Slip next 4sts. onto a cable needle and leave at back of work; k3, then k4 from cable needle.
Cable 6: Slip next 3sts. onto a cable needle and leave at back of work; k3, then k3 from cable needle.
Cable 5: Slip next 3sts. onto a cable needle and leave at back of work; k2, then k3 from cable needle.
Cable 4: Slip next 2sts. onto a cable needle and leave at back of work; k2, then k2 from cable needle.
Cable 3: Slip next 2sts. onto a cable needle and leave at back of work; k1, then k2 from cable needle.

Now begin the yoke, which is worked in one piece.

Cast on 288 sts fairly loosely and work in cable pattern as follows:

1st row (right side facing): P4, * k8, p8; repeat from * to last 12 sts, k8, p4.
2nd row: K4, * p8, k8; repeat from * to last 12 sts, p8, k4.

Repeat the 1st and 2nd rows 3 times more.

9th row: P4, * cable8, p8; repeat from * to last 12 sts, cable8, p4.
10th row: as 2nd row.
11th row: as 1st row.
12th row (decrease row): K4, * p8, k3, k2tog, k3; repeat from * to last 12 sts, p8, k4. [271 sts]
13th row: P4, * k8, p7; repeat from * to last 12 sts, k8, p4.
14th row: K4, * p8, k7; repeat from * to last 12 sts, p8, k4.
15th and 16th rows: as 13th and 14th rows.
17th row: P4, * cable8, p7; repeat from * to last 12 sts, cable8, p4.
18th row (decrease row): K4, * p3, p2tog, p3, k7; repeat from * to last 12 sts, p3, k2tog, p3, k4. [253 sts]

Work 5 rows straight keeping the continuity of the cable rib pattern.

24th row (decrease row): K4, * p7, k3, k2tog, k2; repeat from * to last 11 sts, p7, k4. [236 sts]
25th row: P4, * cable7, p6; repeat from * to last 11 sts, cable7, p4.

Work 4 rows straight keeping the continuity of the cable rib pattern.

30th row (decrease row): K4, * p3, k2tog, p2, k6; repeat from * to last 11 sts, p3, p2tog, p2, k4. [218 sts]

Work 2 rows straight keeping the continuity of the cable rib pattern.

33rd row: P4, * cable6, p6; repeat from * to last 10 sts, cable6, p4.

Work a further 2 rows straight keeping pattern as before.

Continue thus, working a cable on every 8th row from previous cable, at the same time decreasing alternately in the knit and then in the purl panels, that is: decrease 1 stitch in each of the 15 knit panels on next row, then 1 stitch in each of the 17 purl panels on the following 6th row, omitting the 4 border stitches at each end.

Repeat these 2 decrease rows with 5 rows straight between each and always keeping continuity of cable rib pattern until you have worked 10 decrease rows in all, when 113 sts remain and 3 sts remain in each of the knit and purl panels with the 4 border stitches at each end.

Work a further 4 rows straight.

Next row: P4, * cable3; repeat from * to last 7 sts., cable 3, p. 4.

Work a further 5 rows straight in rib, then work another row cabling across the 3 knit stitches as before. Repeat last 6 rows until work measures 8 inches, then work a further 2 rows in rib.

Cast off.

To work the buttonholes:
With crochet hook, work 3 rows of double crochet down left side of opening, then 3 rows down right side, making 8 small button loops in 3rd row. Fasten off.

Optional fringing:
Cut 2 strands of wool each 3 inches long, fold in half and knot through every alternate stitch of cast-on edge. Now take last 2 strands from one knot together with first 2 from next knot and knot these 4 together to form trellis fringe as shown in photograph. Trim fringe evenly. Sew on buttons. Do not press cables but press crochet edging lightly.

To Make Up

Sew in all ends.
Do not press cables but press crochet edging lightly.
Sew on buttons.

Materials

Original materials called for: 2 ozs. Patons Beehive Fingering 3-ply. **

A pair of No 12 (2¾mm) needles.
[Editor's note: You can use a circular needle here but knit backwards and forwards.]
A cable needle.
A No 13 (2¼mm) crochet hook.
8 small buttons.

Tension

Original yarn knits 34sts x 42 rows to four inches over stocking stitch on No 12 needles.

Substitute yarn knits 27sts x 38 rows to four inches on 2½mm needles.

Size matters

One size. Depth: 8 inches, excluding fringe.

**A word on the wool.

I used a vintage Phildar yarn called Anouchka (80% acrylic 16%, mohair, 4% wool), in a bright red. It knits to a tension of 27sts x 38 rows on 2½mm needles, and I used No 13 (2¼mm) regardless of tension.

Crochet

Double crochet in the UK is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

December 2009

Matching Mittens

MatchingMittens.jpg

In need of an additional gift that you can speedily knit? - then this is for you. (Unless you live in the tropics, when it would probably never be for you).

I made these mittens to go with the beret Featherbed by Louisa Harding from her book Little Cake. I like Louisa's work, and yarns; however, I made her beret in Rowan Kid Classic as I needed a particular colour, and in consequence had sufficient left to make mittens, using a similar stitch pattern. Using Kid Classic was fine but made for an even more lightweight beret - I think I would like to try the recommended yarn for a slightly bulkier feel as intended.
The mittens are lovely and warm and .... feathery.

Instructions:

(Make two gloves alike)

Cast on 36 stitches, arrange evenly over 3 needles.
Join in a round, and begin fancy rib as follows:

1st round: * K3, p1, k1, p1; repeat from * 6 times to end of round.
Repeat round 1 three more times.

5th round: * Slip1, k2, then pass the slipped stitch over the 2 knitted sts; p1, k1, p1; repeat from * 6 times to end of round. [30sts]
6th round: * K1, yon, k1, p1, k1, p1; repeat from * 6 times to end of round. [36sts]
7th and 8th rounds: as 1st.

Repeat rounds 5 through 8 four times more times.

21st round: as 5th.
22nd round (increase): * K1, yon, k1, p1, yon, k1,p1; repeat from * 6 times to end of round. [42 sts]

23rd round: * K3, p1, k2, p1; repeat from * 6 times to end of round.
24th round: * K3, p1, k2tog, yon, p1; repeat from * 6 times to end of round.
25th round: * Slip1, k2, then pass the slipped stitch over the 2 knitted sts; p1, k2, p1; repeat from * 6 times to end of round. [36sts]
26th round: * K1, yon, k1; p1, yon; slip1, k1, psso; p1; repeat from * 6 times to end of round. [42 sts]
Repeat rounds 23 through 26 three times more times.

39th round: * K3, p1, k2, p1; repeat from * 5 times.
Then: k3, p1, k1. Using waste yarn, knit the last 2 sts of the round.
Slip these 2 sts back onto the left needle and knit them again using working yarn.

40th round: Begin the next round continuing with the waste yarn, and k5. Slip these 5 sts back onto the left needle and knit them again using working yarn. Then finish the round as follows: k1, yon, p1; * k3, p1, k2tog, yon, p1; repeat from * 5 times to end of round. [43sts]

41st round: Slip1, k2, then pass the slipped stitch over the 2 knitted sts; p1, k2tog, k1, p1; * slip1, k2, then pass the slipped stitch over the 2 knitted sts; p1, k2, p1; repeat from * 5 times to end of round. [36sts]

42nd round: * K1, yon, k1; p1, yon; slip1, k1, psso; p1; repeat from * 6 times to end of round. [42 sts]

Repeat rounds 23 through 26 twice more. Cast off 42 sts (not too tightly).

Work the thumb.

Go back to the waste yarn and carefully remove it, placing the resulting live sts on two double-point needles; there will be 7
sts below the opening, that look like normal sts, and aim to get 8 sts above - ensure you pick up all the loops.

Now set off working in a round; starting with the 7 sts below the opening, arrange the sts as follows: Place the first 2 sts on a needle and leave for the end of the round.

Join in the yarn and using another needle, k3, p1, then k2tog (the last of the 7 lower sts and the first of the 8 upper sts), yon, then purl the second stitch from the upper needle. This is "needle one" and has 7 sts.
Using another needle, k1, k2tog, k1. This is "needle two" and has 3 sts.
Using another needle, p1, then k2tog (the last of the 8 upper sts and the first of the two sts you left for the end of the round), p1. This is "needle three" and has 4sts. [14 sts]

1st round: * Slip1, k2, then pass the slipped stitch over the 2 knitted sts; p1, k2, p1; repeat from * once to end of round. [12sts]
2nd round: * K1, yon, k1; p1, yon; slip1, k1, psso; p1; repeat from * once to end of round. [14 sts]
3rd round: * K3, p1, k2, p1; repeat from * once to end of round.
4th round: * K3, p1, k2tog, yon, p1; repeat from * once to end of round.
5th round: as 1st.
6th round: as 2nd.

Cast off 14 thumb sts loosely.

Making up:
Sew in all ends.

Materials

1 x 50g ball Rowan Kid Classic.

Small length of waste yarn in contrasting colour, (something slippery like cotton preferably).

One set of 4 No. 8 (4 mm) needles.

Tension

Kid Classic knits to a tension of 18sts and 24 rows to 4 inches on 6mm needles.

Size matters

Width all round above thumb, 7 ins. To alter the size use larger or smaller needles as required.

Abbreviations

yon: yarn over needle - makes an extra stitch which forms a small pattern hole when knitted on the next row.

psso: pass the slipped stitch over. Effectively you are "knitting 2 together through back loops"
(slip1, k1, psso is the same as ssk or "slip, slip, knit the 2 slipped sts together")

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

November 2009

Cosy cable socks

CosyCableSocks.jpg

Father George recently handed back his bedsocks as they had holes in the heels. I dutifully mended them, but thought this a good excuse to give him another pair.

These socks are one size, but easily stretch to fit comfortably around a man's foot, as well as fitting round my own foot (small lady's), albeit loosely. If you want cosy house socks for a female foot then simply adjust the length. These are intentionally short at the ankle, but again you can easily knit them longer for the size you need.

Instructions

With No. 9 needles, cast on 60 stitches loosely, and arrange over 3 needles.

1st round: * K4, p2; repeat from * to end of round.
2nd-4th rounds: As first round.
5th (cable) round: * C4B, p2; repeat from * to end of round.
6th round: As first round.

These are the six basic pattern rounds.

Repeat these six rounds twice more, (or as many times as you need to lengthen the sock at the ankle), and then the first round once again.
[Editor's note: If you want the sock to be longer in the leg, then add more rows here.]

Divide for heel flap.

Next Row: Knit the first 28 sts of the round on to one needle to work for the heel.

Divide the remaining 32 sts across 2 needles, and leave to work the instep later. If you have worked the pattern correctly there will be a symmetrical set of complete cables across the 32 instep sts, starting and ending with p2.

Return to your heel sts, and turn the work so that you can work back and forth across the heel sts using 2 needles.

Next Row: Slip1 purlwise then purl across the remaining 27 sts. [28 sts].
Next round: * Slip1, k1; repeat from * to end of round.

Repeat the last 2 rows 12 times more.

Turn the heel.

Work short rows as follows:

Next Row: Slip1 purlwise then purl across 15sts, p2tog, p1. Turn
Next Row: Slip1, k5, s1, k1, psso, k1. Turn
Next Row: Slip1 p6, p2tog, p1. Turn
Next Row: Slip1, k7, s1, k1, psso, k1. Turn

Continue working in this way until all the sts have been incorporated [16sts], ending with a knit row, and right side facing.

Continuing to work onto the same needle (needle 1), pick up and knit 15 sts along side of heel.
Slip all the instep sts on to one needle, and using a 2nd needle knit across instep sts, in the cable pattern, starting at the second row.
Using 3rd needle, pick up and knit 15 sts along side of heel.
Knit the first 8 sts from Needle 1, and slip these on to the end of Needle 3. [78 sts].

[Editor's note: I am not one to encourage a sloppy attitude to knitting, but...
When you pick up sts down the side of the heel flap for this design of sock it is not essential that you pick up exactly the number stated - you do not even have to pick up the same number down each side of the flap - I often find that I have one more on one side than the other (this is due to the way I make the heel flaps which we won't dwell on here!). Whatever you pick up, you must decrease to the right number as you do the shape the instep - it's not the number of decreases but the final number of sts that is important.
I would say though, that whatever you do on the first sock, try and remember to repeat it on the second sock - that's best...]

Shape the instep:

1st round: 1st needle: knit to the last 3sts, k2tog, k1.
2nd needle: Knit, following the 6-row cable pattern as set. 3rd needle: K1, slip1, k1, psso, knit to end.
2nd round: Knit.

Repeat these two rounds until 60sts remain (14 on the first needle, 32 on the second needle, 14 on the third needle).

Continue on these sts, (continuing the cable pattern on the upper foot as set), until you have completed 12 cable patterns from the very beginning of the work, or until work measures 2 inches less than the desired foot length.
[Editor's note: If you want the sock to be smaller or larger, alter the length here.]

Shape toe:

Continue in stocking stitch only (no more cables), as follows: knit the sts from Needle 1, then knit the first st from Needle 2 and put it on Needle 1. Knit 30 sts from Needle 2, then place the last st onto Needle 3. Knit across 15 sts on Needle 3.

1st round: 1st needle: knit to the last 3sts, k2tog, k1.
2nd needle: k1, slip1, k1, psso, knit to the last 3sts, k2tog, k1. 3rd needle: K1, slip1, k1, psso, knit to end. [56sts]
2nd round: Knit.

Repeat these 2 rounds until 32 sts remain, ending with 1st round.

Then repeat round 1 twice more [24 sts].

Making up.

Knit the sts from needle one, break the thread leaving a long tail.
Slip the sts from needles 1 and 3 onto one needle.

Graft the two sets of 12 sts together.
[Editor's note: if you have a suitable computer, here is a super video demo of grafting,otherwise use the link above for a picture demo]
Sew in all ends.

Make a second sock to match.

Materials

About 1 x 50g skein (139 metres) Phildar Oxygene, colour 38, Neptune.
[Editor's note: If you lengthen the sock at the ankle you will need more wool.]

One set of 4 No. 9 (3½mm) double- pointed needles.

Tension

23 sts x 30 rows to 4 inches measured over stocking stitch on No 9 (3½mm) needles.

Size matters

The pattern as written should fit a foot of 11 inches in length.

Abbreviations

C4B: "cable 4 back"; slip the next 2sts onto a cable needle and leave at the back of the work, k2, then k2 from cable needle.
This cable is ideal to work using the method without a cable needle.

psso: pass the slipped stitch over. Effectively you are "knitting 2 together through back loops"
(slip1, k1, psso is the same as ssk or "slip, slip, knit the 2 slipped sts together")

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist

 

June 2009

Tennis Socks

TennisSocks.jpg

Early 1950s tennis socks originally knitted in crisp navy and white wool. I love cuffed socks but detect that some others (my sister) clearly do not. These have the design made specifically to fold down though - so there's no way out.

Instructions.

The pattern works the instep and the sole separately on two needles to enable you to work the fair isle pattern across the instep only. It is not possible to achieve this in the round. However, you join the two together as you knit.

Using No 12 needles with main shade (M), cast on 59 sts loosely and join in a round. Work 4 rounds in moss (also known as seed) stitch [every row k1 p1].

Next Round (increasing): K3; (m1, k8) 7 times. [66 sts]

Cuff border:

Change to No 11 needles and join in contrast (C) and work wave pattern border by repeating the 6 stitch pattern 10 times:

1st Round: * k3 contrast (C), k3 navy (N); repeat from * to end.
2nd Round:
* k1(N), k3(C), k1(N), k1(C) ; repeat from * to end.
3rd Round: * k2(N), k3(C), k1N; repeat from * to end.
4th Round: Knit in N.
5th Round (decreasing): K31; k2tog; ssk2tog; k31. [64 sts]

Now continue with cuff diamond pattern, repeating the 8 stitch pattern 8 times across one round:

6th Round: * k1(C), k2(N), k1(C), k2(N), k2(C); repeat from * to end.
7th Round: * k2(N), k1(C), k1(N), k1(C), k2(N), k1(C); repeat from * to end.
8th Round: * k1(N), k1(C), k3(N), k1(C), k2(N); repeat from * to end.
9th Round: * k1(C), k2(N), k1(C), k2(N), k1(C), k1(N) ; repeat from * to end.
10th Round: * k2(N), k3(C), k2(N), k1(C); repeat from * to end.
11th Round: As 9th.
12th Round: As 8th.
13th Round: As 7th.
14th Round: As 6th.

Now break off C and continue with N only; change to No 12 needles and work 7 rounds knitting.

Then turn the work so you are working the rounds in the other direction. This reverses the work to allow the cuff to fold over with the right side visible.

Work 8 more rounds knitting; at the end of the first round knit into the stitch below the first stitch of the round and knit it together with the last stitch of the round to avoid a small hole in the work.
Editor's note: Even if you don't understand how to do this, any tiny hole will not be visible as it is hidden under the cuff.

Join in C, working main diamond pattern, repeating the 8 stitch pattern 8 times:

1st Round: * k1(N), k2(C), k1(N), k2(C), k2(N), ; repeat from * to end.
2nd Round: * k2(C), k1(N), k1(C), k1(N), k2(C), k1(N); repeat from * to end.
3rd Round: * k1(C), k1(N), k3(C), k1(N), k2(C); repeat from * to end.
4th Round: * k1(N), k2(C), k1(N), k2(C), k1(N), k1(C); repeat from * to end.
5th Round: * k2(C), k3(N), k2(C), k1(N); repeat from * to end.
6th Round: As 4th.
7th Round: As 3rd.
8th Round: As 2nd.

These 8 rows form the pattern.
Work rows 1-5 inclusive again.

Continue with N only and divide for the heel, however do not break off C.

Divide for heel

Next Row: Using navy wool only, knit the next 31 stitches on to one needle to work for the heel.

Divide the remaining 33 sts across 2 needles, and leave to work the instep later. If you have worked the pattern correctly there will be a symmetrical set of complete patterns across the 33 instep sts. Make sure that it looks like this (you will have just completed row 5, the middle row in the picture):

[ Editor's note: If it doesn't look like this... you can compensate by knitting more or fewer sts for the heel flap until you get to the pattern boundary. Then when you purl back on the row below, follow the instructions as set to get your 30 sts. You should have your instep sts set correctly as above. If you still haven't then there is likely a mistake in your fair isle pattern.]

Return to your heel sts, and turn the work so that you can work back and forth across the heel sts using 2 needles.

Next Row: Purl back across 15 sts, p2 together, purl remaining 14 sts. [30 sts].

Heel flap

Next Row: * Slip 1, knit 1; repeat from * across all 30 sts.
Next Row: Slip the first stitch, p29.
Next Row: * Slip 1, knit 1; repeat from * across all 30 sts.

Repeat last 2 rows 13 times more.

Turn heel

Turn the heel by working short rows:

Next Row: Slip the first stitch, p16, p2tog, p1; turn.
Next Row: Slip1, k5, ssk, k1; turn.
Next Row: Slip 1, p6, p2tog, p1; turn.
Next Row: Slip 1, k7, ssk, k1; turn.

Continue in this way until all the sts have been incorporated in the row, ending with a knit row. [18 sts]

Turn. Purl one row.
Do not turn work, do not break wool.

Pick up and purl 16 sts down side of heel flap to bring the navy wool back to work the patterned instep. Leave these 16 sts along with the 18 heel sts, on a spare needle or stitch holder.

Upper foot panel

Take 33 sts left on needles 1 and 2, and slip them on to one needle.

Continue to use the navy yarn and pick up the contrast C, which should be waiting for you at the beginning of a purl side instep row (row 6 of the pattern). Begin working back and forth across these 33 sts, keeping the continuity of the pattern starting with a purl row and working from row 6 of the chart where you left off; work alternate rows in knit and purl.
Work the first 6 rows without slipping the first stitch and after that, slip the first stitch of every row.

Continue for 5½ inches or 4 inches less than overall desired foot length, ending with a knit row.
[ Editor's note: This is where you can adjust the length of the foot. Each pattern is approximately 1 inch, and it is nicer if you can end your work after one complete pattern, which will be to the nearest half-inch, after knitting row 5 or row 1 of the pattern. If your feet have not grown to a multiple of half inches you can still work to complete patterns, and compensate by adding a couple of rows when you work the toe.]

Break contrast yarn, and continue in navy only.

Turn the work and purl across 15 sts; p2tog; p16.

Continue with wrong side facing, using another No 12 needle, pick up and purl about 27sts from the slipped sts down the right side of the upper foot panel, and from the edges of the first 5 rows you knitted.
[ Editor's note: This is 27 sts, or more, or less, depending on how you adjusted the foot length. Also - when you pick up these sts you may want to work the sts through their back loops to keep them tight.]

Mark the stitch, by placing a piece of waste wool between the sts at this point. The waste wool should be about 6 inches long in an easily distinguished contrasting colour, and smooth, (for example cotton), as it will be woven between rows, and later pulled out.

Using the same No 12 working needle, pick up and purl 17 sts from side of heel flap, then purl 9 sts from the heel.

Using another No 12 working needle, purl the 9 remaining heel sts, and then purl the 16 sts you already picked up from the other side of the heel flap.

Mark the stitch with a piece of waste wool, as before.

Continuing with this needle, purl along the left side of the upper foot panel, picking up 27 sts from the edges of the first 6 rows you knitted and from the slipped edge sts.

The work is arranged on 3 needles. The picture shows the working needle in the process of knitting across the sole, and the waste wool markers in white.
[ Editor's note: This is where you need the needles to be long. I managed with 8 inch dpns but they really need to be longer to ensure you don't lose sts off the ends. While you are working and joining the sole, it might be prudent to put end stops on the two working needles.

Purl across the 32 sts at the top of the panel. Then using one of the spare needles, purl down the right side of the panel again, as far as the stitch marker.]
The marker is trapped between sts in the row below; pass the waste wool between the sts again before continuing, so that it will be trapped between the rows and continue to mark the sts for the sole section.

Do not turn the work.

Sole

Using the No 12 working needles, you are going to knit back and forth across the sole (between the markers) in stocking stitch, knitting the last stitch from each row together with one stitch from the upper foot panel.

1st Row: (Wrong side facing) Slip1, p24 from first needle, (16 sts up side of heel and 9 sts from heel flap), then purl 24 sts from second needle, up to 1 stitch before the stitch marker. Purl the last stitch of the sole section together with the first of the instep sts. [50sts between the markers]
Turn.
Continue to work sole on 3 needles, one working needle and the sts arranged evenly over the other 2.

2nd Row: (Right side facing) Pass the waste wool marker between the sts. Slip 1, ssk2tog; knit to the last 3 sts before the marker; k2tog, ssk the last stitch of the row together with the next instep stitch as before. [48sts between the markers] Turn.
3rd Row: Pass the waste wool marker between the sts. Slip 1, purl to the last stitch; purl together the last of the sole sts with the first instep stitch as before. [48sts between the markers] Turn.

Repeat 2nd and 3rd rows, shaping the sole by decreasing 2 sts on the knit rows, until 28 sole sts remain between the markers.

Then continue without shaping as follows (continuing to weave in the markers as before):

Next Row: Slip 1, purl to the last stitch before the marker; purl together the last of the sole sts with the first instep stitch as before.
Next Row: Slip 1, knit to the last st before the marker; ssk the last stitch of the row together with the next instep stitch as before. Turn.

Repeat the last 2 rows until all the sts from the sides of the upper foot have been joined to the sole. Do not join any of the sole sts to the 32 sts left on the 4th needle at the end of the panel.
End with a knit row. Do not turn.

Toe

Now you continue to work the sole and upper foot sts together in a round, as follows:

With right side facing, using your working needle (needle 1), knit across 32 sts from the upper foot. Knit the next 14 sts from the sole on to the next needle (needle 2), and knit the final 14 sts from the sole on to the next needle (needle 3).
Knit the first stitch from the upper foot panel on needle 1 and slip it on to the end of needle 3. Slip the last stitch from the upper foot panel on to the beginning of needle 2.

You have 60 sts arranged with 30 sts on needle 1, and 15 sts on each off needles 2 and 3.

Continue to work in rounds as follows:

[ Editor's note: This is where you can adjust the length of the foot if your feet have not grown to a multiple of half inches. Work a couple of extra plain rounds here before starting the decreasing.]

1st Round: Needle 1: k1, ssk2tog; knit to the last 3 sts; k2tog, k1.
Needle 2: k1, ssk2tog, knit to end.
Needle 3: knit to the last 3 sts; k2tog, k1. [56 sts]
2nd Round: Knit.

Repeat rounds 1 and 2 until 24 sts remain.
[ Editor's note: You can decrease further if you have pointed toes.]

Slip the sts from needles 1 and 2 on to one needle and graft together with the sts on needle 3.

Making up

Sew in all ends. Fold down cuff.

Materials

4 ply: 2 ozs navy, 1 oz contrast colour.

One set each of 4 double pointed needles (dpns) size 11 (3mm) and 12 (2¾mm).
The smaller (12) needles need to be 9 or more inches in length.

Tension

30 stitches and 32 rows to 4 inches over pattern.

Size matters

Length from top to bottom of heel, top turned down, 5 inches; length of foot 9 inches (adjustable).

Abbreviations

N is main shade (navy).
C is contrast (pink).

m1: make one by picking up the loop between sts and knitting into the back of it

ssk/ssk2tog: (slip, slip, knit) - or (slip1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over). Effectively you are "knitting 2 together through back loops".

 

A Word
on the Wool.

The recommended wool was Patons Purple Heather Fingering, (which in this era was a pure wool 4 ply), in navy for the main shade and white for the contrast.

Example used Sunbeam St Ives Sock wool in navy and Jaeger Baby Merino 4 ply in pink (50g balls, each about 200yds) - almost all of one ball of the main, and about half of the contrast.
Both wools are now extinct I think but substitute 4ply sock wools are fairly easy to find.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

Original photo from Stitchcraft April 1950, constructed using a different pattern on 2 needles with seam under sole. Generally, seams in socks are avoided so they are more comfortable to wear; a seam right under the ball of the foot cannot be ideal as sportswear. I imagine these socks were for visual impact rather than practicality.

April 2009

Folk Cardigan for a little girl - or boy..

DucklingCardigan.jpg

Cute cardigan for a little girl with folk pattern of birds. Acceptable enough for a baby boy using a "masculine" colour (blue?!) and adapting the welts from their frilly form to a conventional rib.

Instructions:

The body of the cardigan is knitted in one piece. There are options for a plain welt as well as the frilled version - perhaps to better suit a boy.

Frilled welt:
Cast on 308 sts.

1st row: * P2, k7; repeat from *to last 2 sts; p2.
2nd row: K2, *p7, k2; repeat from *to end.
3rd row: *P2, slip1, k1, pass the slipped st over, k3, k2tog; repeat from *to last 2 sts; p2.
4th row: K2, *p5, k2; repeat from *to end.
5th row: *P2, slip1, k1, pass the slipped st over, k1, k2tog; repeat from *to last 2 sts; p2.
6th row: K2, *p3, k2; repeat from *to end.
7th row: *P2, slip2 together, k1, pass two slipped st over together; repeat from *to last 2 sts; p2.
8th row: P4, *m1, p5; repeat from *to end. [124 sts]
[m1 = make one by picking up a loop between the sts and purling into the back of it.]

Alternative plain ribbed welt:
Cast on 124 sts and work 6 rows in k1, p1 rib.

9th row: K31, place marker; k62, place marker; k31.

Duckling border:
Continue in stocking stitch.
Work the 15 rows from the chart, working left to right on the wrong side rows, and working right to left on the right side rows.

Starting with wrong side facing, set the 31 stitch pattern across the row as follows:
[Editor's note: Weave the unused colour in across the back as you knit. This tends to make the knitting rather tight so make sure you knit loosely - or - use needles one size larger while you knit these 15 rows.].

Row 1: *p1 in blue, p29 in white, p1 in blue*; p0; repeat from * to * twice; p0; repeat from * to *.

Row 15: as row 1.
Break contrast yarn.

Next row: (right side facing) Knit in main shade.
Next row: (wrong side facing) Purl in main shade.

Continue with main shade only stocking stitch until work measures 6 inches, including the frill, ending with a purl row and right side facing for next row.
[Editor's note: This is approximately 22 rows in main shade after you have finished the pattern rows.]

Divide for fronts and back:
Next row: (right side facing) S1, k1, psso, (also known as ssk), knit 29st; turn. Continue on these 30 sts to make the right front, leaving remaining sts on a stitch holder.

Next row: Purl.
Next row: Knit
Next row: Purl.
Next row: S1, k1, psso, (also known as ssk), knit to end.

Repeat the last 4 rows, decreasing at front edge only until 21 sts remain. Continue without shaping until armhole edge measures 5 inches, ending with a purl row.
[Editor's note: This is approximately 40 rows for the armhole.]
Break yarn, leaving sts on a holder for grafting.

Left front:
With right side facing, slip 31sts from the holder for the left front on to a working needle, rejoin the yarn at the armhole edge, and knit 1 row. Leave the centre 62 sts on the holder to pick up later for the back.
Next row: (wrong side facing) P2tog, purl 29; turn.

Next row: Knit.
Next row: Purl
Next row: Knit.
Next row: P2tog, purl to end.

Repeat the last 4 rows, decreasing at front edge only until 21 sts remain. Complete to match the right front, ending with a knit row.

Back:
With right side facing, rejoin the yarn to the remaining 62 sts on the holder, and knit across all sts.

Work straight in stocking stitch until back matches fronts at armhole edge, ending with a purl row.

Next row: K21, cast off 20, k21.
Break yarn, leaving two lots of shoulder sts on a holder for grafting.

Join shoulders.
Graft front and back shoulder sts together.

Sleeves (both alike):
Cast on 83 sts, and work frilled welt as follows:

1st row: * P2, k7; repeat from *to last 2 sts; p2.
2nd row: K2, *p7, k2; repeat from *to end.
3rd row: *P2, slip1, k1, pass the slipped st over, k3, k2tog; repeat from *to last 2 sts; p2.
4th row: K2, *p5, k2; repeat from *to end.
5th row: *P2, slip1, k1, pass the slipped st over, k1, k2tog; repeat from *to last 2 sts; p2.
6th row: K2, *p3, k2; repeat from *to end.
7th row: *P2, slip2 together, k1, pass two slipped st over together; repeat from *to last 2 sts; p2.
8th row: P1, *m1, p3; repeat from *to last stitch, m1, p1. [39 sts]
[m1 = make one by picking up a loop between the sts and purling into the back of it.]

Alternative plain ribbed welt:
Cast on 39 sts and work 6 rows in k1, p1 rib.

Now join in contrast and work 3 rows as follows.
9th row: K1 in main shade, k2 contrast; * k2 main shade; k2 contrast; repeat from * to end, (stringing the unused yarns as before across the back of the work). Break main shade yarn.
10th row: Purl across row in contrast.
11th row: Rejoin main shade and work as row 9. Break contrast yarn.
12th row: Purl across row in main shade.

Continuing in main shade only, increase one stitch at each end of the next and every following 4th row, until there are 61sts. Work straight until sleeve is 8 inches long (including the frill), or to required length.

Cast off loosely, using one size larger needle.

Work second sleeve the same.

Button border:
With right side facing, using the No 9 (3½mm) circular needle as before, commencing at the right front above the frill, pick up and knit 29 sts evenly along straight edge, 29 sts evenly along shaped edge, 20 sts across back neck, then 29 sts evenly along shaped edge of left front, and finally 29 sts evenly along straight edge of left front, ending at top of frill. [136 stitches].

[Editor's note: My method for picking up sts evenly is to pick up 2 sts for every 3 row ends. I use a double pointed needle and slip it into all the alternate row ends - the ones that tend to stick out more as little bumps. Then using my working needle, I knit into 2 bumps from the dpn and then pick up an extra stitch in between the bumps.
The number of stitches you pick up will depend on how many rows you knitted in the body, so if it's not quite 136 it does not matter; you can still follow the instructions below provided you end up with an even number of stitches .]

Next row: Slip the first stitch;* k1; p1; repeat from * to last st; k1.
Next row: Slip the first stitch; k1, p1, * k2tog; yarn over needle; p1; (k1, p1) 3 times repeat from * twice more, then k2tog; yarn over needle; p1, to make the 4th buttonhole.
Continue in rib as set to end of row.
Next row: Slip the first stitch;* k1; p1; repeat from * to last st; k1.

Work one more row in rib, then cast off loosely in rib, using a larger size needle if required.

Making up:
Fold sleeves in half lengthwise, then sew into armholes placing fold at grafted shoulder seam. Join sleeve seams.
Sew in all ends.

Press lightly with a damp cloth.
Sew 4 buttons in position to match buttonholes.

Materials

3 x 50g balls Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino (125m per 50g ball), in main shade (colour shown Lavender 605).
1 ball contrast.

One circular No 9 (3½mm) needle.

Tension

24sts and 32 rows to 4 inches on No 9 (3½mm) needles in stocking stitch.

Size matters

Insructions for 6-12 months size.
Actual chest 22 inches; full length 11 inches; sleeve 8 inches (adjustable).

A word on the wool

Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino is a lovely yarn, (55% merino wool, 33% microfibre, 12% cashmere).
I like the weight of this wool, which is a fine double knitting. It combines the best of optimizing a quick-knit tension with a light weight result, as well as being durable.
Perfect for kids (and adults!).

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

DucklingCardigan.jpg


March 2009

Easter Bunny

EasterBunny.jpg

"Who could resist this adorable dressed bunny?"
Well, I for one can resist the dressed part. I am not very fond of dressed animals (even stuffed ones). However, the dress is very pretty, and it would tone down the effect of the rather strong pink colour I have chosen for the rabbit. The Phildar yarn makes for a really soft effect; the pink is discontinued but there is a white, which I think would be very cute.
"So cuddly, a small child would love her at once. Very easily and quickly knitted in garter stitch throughout."

Instructions:

Bunny is worked throughout on No 8 needles and garter stitch (ever row knit). When making up, all seams are joined on the right side.

Body (work two pieces alike):
Cast on 11 sts using No 8 needles and chunky yarn.

1st row: Knit
2nd row: Knit twice in first stitch; knit to last st, and knit twice in last st [13 sts]
3rd row: Knit
4th row: as second row [15 sts]
Knit the next 6 rows.
11th row: as second row [17 sts]
Knit the next 11 rows.
23rd row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [15 sts]
Knit the next 3 rows.
27th-29th rows: Decrease 1 st at each end of the next 3 rows [9 sts]
Cast off 9 sts. The cast off edge is the neck edge.

Base:
Cast on 5 sts.

1st row: Knit
2nd row: Knit twice in first stitch; knit to last st, and knit twice in last st [7 sts]
3rd row: Knit
4th row: as second row [9 sts]
Knit the next 2 rows.
7th row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [7 sts]
8th row: Knit
9th row: as 7th row. [5 sts]
10th row: Knit
Cast off 5 sts.

Making up the body:
Join the sides of the body, then insert the base, sewing it onto the cast on edges of the two body pieces.
Stuff firmly and gather up neck opening. (Try and stuff the body more firmly than the head so it has more weight, to give the toy more stability).

Front Legs (work four pieces alike):
**
Cast on 11 sts. Knit the next 2 rows.

3rd row: Knit twice in first stitch; knit to last st, and knit twice in last st [13 sts]
Knit the next 4 rows.
8th row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [11 sts]
Knit the next 7 rows.
**
16th-17th rows: Decrease 1 st at each end of the next 2 rows [7 sts]
Cast off 7sts. The cast off edge is where the leg joins the body.

Making up the front legs:
Join each pair, leaving the cast off edges open.
Stuff firmly and sew up opening, then join this end to the body.
Run a gathering thread around the wrists, and mark claws with black straight stitches.

Back Legs (work four pieces alike):
Work as for front legs from ** to **.
Knit 5 more rows.
21st-22nd rows: Decrease 1 st at each end of the next 2 rows [7 sts]
Cast off 7sts. The cast off edge is where the leg joins the body.

Making up the back legs:
Stuff and make up as for the front legs and sew to body.

Tail (work 2 pieces alike):
[Editor's note: I did not use this tail. I made a tail with a white woollen pom-pom (see the picture) - why wouldn't you? I thought that, in the fable that is childhood, rabbits were renowned for their powder-puff tails. However, I think my tail turned out a wee bit large].
Cast on 5 sts.
Knit one row.
Increase 1 st at each end of the next 3 rows.
Knit 6 rows.
Decrease 1 st at each end of the next 3 rows.
Cast off 5 sts.

Making up the tail:
Join the two halves together, leaving an opening for stuffing.
Stuff and sew up opening. Join to body.

Head (work 2 pieces alike):
Cast on 11 sts. Knit the next 6 rows.
[Editor's note: The head pieces are not symmetrical. Mark the side (just use a safety pin, a stitch marker or a piece of coloured thread) where most of the increasing and decreasing happens - this is the nose and will help you match it up when you join the pieces. Also check that you are doing this shaping all on the same side of the piece].

*
7th row: Knit twice in first stitch; knit to end [12 sts]
8th row: Knit to last st, and knit twice in last st [13 sts]
9th row: Knit twice in first stitch; knit to last st, and knit twice in last st [15 sts]
10th row: Knit to last st, and knit twice in last st [16 sts]
*
Repeat from from * to * once more.

Knit the next 8 rows.
23rd row: K2tog; knit to end [15 sts]
24th row: Knit to last 2 sts; k2tog [14 sts]
25th row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [12 sts]
26th row: Knit to last 2 sts; k2tog [11 sts]
27th row: K2tog; knit to end [10 sts]
28th row: Knit to last 2 sts; k2tog [9 sts]
29th row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [7 sts]
30th row: Knit to last 2 sts; k2tog [6 sts]
31st row: K2tog; knit to end [5 sts]
32nd row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [3 sts]

Cast off 3 sts.

Making up the head:
Join the two halves together, leaving the cast on edges open.
Stuff firmly, shaping the dome of the head to look like a bunny.

Features (embroidered):
Nose: black satin stitch.
Mouth: black vertical and horizontal straight stitches.
Whiskers: long black straight stitches.
Eyes: White, blue, and black satin stitch, and outlined in black straight stitches.
Lashes: Four vertical straight stitches in black.
Eyebrows: black straight stitches.

Ears (work 2 alike):
[Editor's note: I worked both ears at once using two balls of wool (as I did for the head). This was because I found it easy to lose track of how many rows I had knitted with this fluffy yarn. A row here or there makes little difference to a toy, but you want the ears etc to be the same size.]
Cast on 3 sts in main colour on No 8 needles.
1st-3rd rows: Knit
4th row: Knit twice in first stitch; knit to last st, and knit twice in last st [5 sts].

Repeat these 4 rows 5 times more until there are 15 sts.

Knit the next 12 rows.

37th row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [13 sts]
38th row: Knit
39th row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [11 sts]

Cast off 11 (this is the edge sewn to the head).

Ears Linings (work 2 alike):
Cast on 4 sts in finer yarn contrast for ears on No 11 needles.
1st-3rd rows: Knit
4th row: Knit twice in first stitch; knit to last st, and knit twice in last st [6 sts].

Repeat these 4 rows 7 times more until there are 20 sts.
Knit the next 20 rows.
[Editor's note: As I worked the linings I kept comparing them to the ears to make sure they were coming out the right size. The result was that for the wool I had chosen I increased to 20 sts but then knitted 25 rows to match the length of the ears. You may note the ears are pretty large - but the head is also proportionally large, so I thought they looked right.]

53rd row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [18 sts]
Knit 3 rows.
54th row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [16 sts]
Knit 3 rows.
55th row: K2 tog; knit to last 2 sts, and k2tog. [14 sts]
Cast off tightly.

Making up the ears:
Join ears and linings together. Fold wide end of ears in half, with lining inside, and sew to the head.

Materials

Original: 3 x 2oz hanks of Big Ben Knitting in Oystershell (main colour);
2ozs turquoise, and 1oz pink double knitting.
Scraps of black, royal blue, and white for features.

Example shown is knitted in 2 x 50g ball Phildar "Neige" (65 yds/60m per 50g ball), colour Oeillet (0013 discontinued).
Ear linings and tail in 25g ball of baby quick-knit (a fine double knitting).

One pair each of No. 8 (4mm) and No 11 (3 mm) needles.

Tension

Big Ben was a chunky wool and worked to a tension of approx. 14sts and 18rows to 4 inches on No 3 (6½mm) needles in stocking stitch.

The Phildar Neige tension is 11sts and 18 rows to 4 inches on No 5 (5½mm) needles in stocking stitch.

Size matters

Original instructions and yarn made a 12½ inch rabbit (including ears).

A word on the wool

Big Ben is a chunky wool similar in gauge to the Phildar I used but knits up very differently on the smaller needles.
The Phildar is rather like eyelash but softer and fluffier - and entirely acrylic. I can strongly recommend using a fluffy yarn like this as it is so forgiving in hiding the sewing up on a toy.
The ear linings are worked in a finer yarn.

I used a lurid pink for the rabbit - but wouldn't she be nice in white with pink ear linings?

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

Bunny Clothes

I chose just to put a ribbon on the bunny. You could make the knitted tie instead or go for the whole dressed bunny look. The dress is pretty and allows you to see the cute little tail.
Clothes and tie are knitted in the finer (DK) yarn on No 11 (3mm) needles.

Neck tie:
Cast on 6 sts on No 11 needles.
Knit 19 inches (or as much as you need) and cast off.
Tie around neck with a bow at the front.

Dress:
Cast on 112 sts [Editor's note: Perhaps you can see now why I was less keen to make the little dress...].
on No 11 needles.
Knit 24 rows.
Next row: Cast off 47; knit 18 sts; cast off remaining 47.
Break yarn.

Rejoin yarn to centre 18 sts, and knit 14 rows.
[Editor's note: This is the pinafore part of the dress].

Next row: Knit 4; cast off 10; knit last 4 sts.
[Editor's note: The two sets of 4 sts are the beginnings of the straps].

Continue to work on the last 4 sts and knit 25 rows.
Next row: K2tog twice and fasten off
Work remaining 4 sts into a strap to match.
Sew up back seam on the skirt.

Dress Frills:
With No 11 needles and same yarn as dress, cast on 6 sts, and knit 1 row.
*Next row: K4, then turn and knit back.
Knit 2 rows across all 6 sts.*
Repeat from * to * until frill fits all around hem of dress.
Join short ends and sew to dress.

Make another frill the same and sew in place half an inch above the first frill.

Put dress on bunny and gather up waist edge to fit.
Sew straps into position on back of dress using French Knots.

February 2009

Valentine Beaded Mittens

ValentineBeadMit1.jpg

I was inspired to make these mitten patterns by brightly coloured offerings from 1975. This is the posh version, even cuter than the intarsia version I think.
They are a close fit on my hands, but though my hands are small, I tend to have short fingers only; the measurement around my hand is just over 7 inches.

Instructions:

Begin working the RIGHT GLOVE:

Thread 12 beads on to the yarn. Cast on 48 stitches, using "backward loop method" as follows: loop 2, slide a bead up next to the loops; loop 4, slide next bead into place; slide next bead into place; and so on to the last bead and then end with loop 2 [48 loops].

Knit one row.
Arrange the stitches over 3 needles (16 on each) and join in a round.

Begin fancy rib as follows:

1st round: * P1, k2, p1, k2, p2; repeat from * to end of round.
Repeat round 1 four more times.

6th (cable) round: * P1, CB5 (cable over 5 sts "back" by slipping the next 3 sts on to a cable needle and leaving at the back of the work; k2, then (p1, k2) from cable needle), p2; repeat from * to end of round.
7th round: as round 1.
8th (bead) round: * P1, k2; hook bead and slip this beaded st, passing the yarn behind, and pulling it firmly as you go into the next st; k2; p2; repeat from * to end of round.
9th round: * P1, k5, p2; repeat from * to end of round.
10th and 11th rounds: as round 1.

Repeat rounds 6 to 11 twice more and then round 6 again.
Now work 3 rounds as round 1 to complete the fancy rib.

Thumb gusset

1st round: K24, p1, k2, p1, k20.
2nd round: as round 1.
3rd round: K24, p1, m1, (make a stitch by picking up the horizontal loop between lying before the next stitch and working into the back of it), k2, m1,p1, k20.
4th and 5th rounds: K24, p1, k4, p1, k20.
6th round: K1, m1, k23, p1, m1, k4, m1,p1, k19, m1, k1.
7th and 8th rounds: K25, p1, k6, p1, k21.
9th round: K25, p1, m1, k6, m1,p1, k21.
10th and 11th rounds: K24, p1, k8, p1, k21.
12th round: K25, p1, m1, k8, m1,p1, k21.
13th and 14th rounds: K25, p1, k10, p1, k21.
15th round: K1, m1, k24, p1, m1, k10, m1,p1, k20, m1, k1.
16th and 17th rounds: K26, p1, k12, p1, k22.
18th round: K26, p1, m1, k12, m1,p1, k22.
19th and 20th rounds: K26, p1, k14, p1, k22.
21st round: K26, p1, m1, k14, m1,p1, k22.
22nd and 23rd round: K26, p1, k16, p1, k22.
24th round: K1, m1, k25, p1, m1, k16, m1,p1, k21, m1, k1. .
25th and 26th rounds: K27, p1, k18, p1, k23. [70 sts]

Now set aside the thumb stitches and continue with the main glove - at the same time work the first row of the pattern from the chart, setting the position of the beaded hearts as follows, repeating the 9 pattern sts 3 times:

Row 1: K4; hook bead and slip this beaded st, passing the yarn behind, and pulling it firmly as you go into the next st; (k8, hook bead) twice; k5; slip the next 18 sts on to a safety pin; cast on 2 sts, k24 to complete the round. [54 sts]

Continue straight, working from the chart for the 9 rows, and completing the three hearts.

Row 10: K1, m1, k52, m1, k1. [56 sts]

Work 4 rows straight.

Divide for fingers

Next round (forefinger): Knit the first 20 sts of the round and place on a stitch holder; place the last 20sts of the round on a second stitch holder; Knit 16; cast on 2 sts. [18 sts]
Distribute these 18sts evenly across 3 needles, and join in a round.
Knit 5 rounds on these 18 sts.
Cast off purlwise.

Next round (middle finger): Slip the last 7sts on the first stitch holder (the ones nearest to the forefinger) onto a needle and knit them; pick up and knit 2 from the cast on sts at the base of the forefinger; slip the first 7sts on the second stitch holder (the ones nearest to the forefinger) onto a needle and knit them; cast on 2 sts. [18 sts].
Distribute these 18sts evenly across 3 needles, and join in a round.
Knit 5 rounds on these 18 sts.
Cast off purlwise.

Next round (third finger): Work and complete as for middle finger.

Next round (little finger): Pick up 2 sts at the base third finger; slip the remaining 6 sts on the second stitch holder onto a needle and knit them; slip the remaining 6 sts on the first stitch holder onto a needle and knit them. [14sts]
Knit 4 rounds on these 14 sts.
Cast off purlwise.

Thumb:
Next round: Transfer the18 thumb sts from the safety pin back on the needles and knit them, then pick up 2 sts from the sts cast on to continue the main glove. Arrange these 20 sts on 3 needles.
Knit 5 rounds on these 20 sts.
Cast off purlwise.

LEFT GLOVE:

Thread 12 beads on to the yarn, cast on 48 stitches, and knit one row, as for right glove.
Arrange the stitches over 3 needles (16 on each) and join in a round.

Begin fancy rib as follows:

1st round: * P2, k2, p1, k2, p1; repeat from * to end of round.
Repeat round 1 four more times.

6th (cable) round: * P2, CF5 (cable over 5 sts "forward" by slipping the next 2sts on to a cable needle and leaving at the front of the work; k2, p1, then k2 from cable needle), p1; repeat from * to end of round.
7th round: as round 1.
8th (bead) round: * P2, k2; hook bead and slip this beaded st, passing the yarn behind, and pulling it firmly as you go into the next st; k2; p1; repeat from * to end of round.
9th round: * P2, k5, p1; repeat from * to end of round.
10th and 11th rounds: as round 1.

Repeat rounds 6 to 11 twice more and then round 6 again.
Now work 3 rounds as round 1 to complete the fancy rib.

Thumb gusset

You work the thumb gusset in the same way as you did for the right glove, but set the position of the thumb differently as follows:

1st round: K20, p1, k2, p1, k24.
2nd round: as round 1.
3rd round: K20, p1, m1, (make a stitch by picking up the horizontal loop between lying before the next stitch and working into the back of it), k2, m1,p1, k24.
4th and 5th rounds: K24, p1, k4, p1, k20.

Continue in this way as for right glove, but following the stitch layout as set until you reach row 25.

25th and 26th rounds: K23, p1, k18, p1, k27. [70 sts]

Now set aside the thumb stitches and continue with the main glove - at the same time work the first row of the pattern from the chart, setting the position of the beaded hearts as follows, repeating the 9 pattern sts 3 times:

Row 1: K24; slip the next 18 sts on to a safety pin; cast on 2 sts; k5; hook bead and slip this beaded st, passing the yarn behind, and pulling it firmly as you go into the next st; (k8, hook bead) twice; k4. [54 sts]

Once you have set the position of the thumb and the bead hearts, you can work the rest of the left glove exactly as for the right glove.

Making up:
Sew in all ends.

Materials

Example shown is knitted in 1 x 50g ball Sunbeam St Ives 4 ply in cream 3103.

One set of 4 No. 12 (2½ mm) needles. A tiny crochet hook for placing the beads.

66 beads size 6/0
[Sanctuary Beads]

Tension

Approx. 32sts and 44 rows to 4 inches on No 12 needles.

Size matters

Width all round above thumb, 7 ins. To alter the size use larger or smaller needles as required.
The cables on the wrist tend to pull in quite tightly without the same flexibility as rib. If you are concerned about this, you might use larger needles to complete the wrist welt, or even put in an extra stitch between each cable (cast on 54) just for the welt and then decrease back to 48 evenly across the last row of the cables. If you do this your pattern repeat will be
{P1, k2, p1, k2, p3}.
And you will need to place the beads on the cast-on row with 6 or 3 loops between beads instead of 4, and you may need a few extra beads to do this.

A word on the wool

The wool I used was from my store room.
If I purchased the wool new, then I would probably go for Rowan 4 ply soft, perhaps in colour 376 "Nippy".

Beading

For those of you who think "Less is More" you might prefer to work a single bead heart, positioned on row 20, with the first bead on the 7th st from the edge.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.


Cast on loop method

Loop the working yarn and place it on needle backward so that it doesn’t unwind; repeat this movement to form the sts.


Hooking Beads.

This method means you don't have to pre-string the beads on your yarn - I think it is good for placing a few beads amid a lot of knitting, when you don't want to carry just a few beads across miles of yarn before you use them, and you also don't want to break your thread.

This information appeared in Knitty.com. (Spring 2006 edition) in an article by Sivia Harding.

Valentine Heart Mittens

ValentineIntarsiaMit2.jpg

I was inspired to make these mitten patterns by brightly coloured offerings from 1975. By the time I had tried out a number of versions - and had many more examples of right-hand gloves than I want or need - my final designs differ substantially from the original. But they are cute aren't they?
They are a close fit on my hands, but though my hands are small, I tend to have short fingers only; the measurement around my hand is just over 7 inches.

Instructions:

Begin working the RIGHT GLOVE:

Using contrast colour, cast on 48 stitches; purl one row, and join into a round.

Change to main colour and knit one row.
Work in k2, p2 rib until work measures about 2 inches from start.

Thumb gusset

1st round: K24, p1, k2, p1, k20.
2nd round: as round 1.
3rd round: K24, p1, m1, (make a stitch by picking up the horizontal loop between lying before the next stitch and working into the back of it), k2, m1,p1, k20.
4th and 5th rounds: K24, p1, k4, p1, k20.
6th round: K1, m1, k23, p1, m1, k4, m1,p1, k19, m1, k1.
7th and 8th rounds: K25, p1, k6, p1, k21.
9th round: K25, p1, m1, k6, m1,p1, k21.
10th and 11th rounds: K24, p1, k8, p1, k21.
12th round: K25, p1, m1, k8, m1,p1, k21.
13th and 14th rounds: K25, p1, k10, p1, k21.
15th round: K1, m1, k24, p1, m1, k10, m1,p1, k20, m1, k1.
16th and 17th rounds: K26, p1, k12, p1, k22.
18th round: K26, p1, m1, k12, m1,p1, k22.
19th and 20th rounds: K26, p1, k14, p1, k22.
21st round: K26, p1, m1, k14, m1,p1, k22.
22nd and 23rd round: K26, p1, k16, p1, k22.
24th round: K1, m1, k25, p1, m1, k16, m1,p1, k21, m1, k1. .
25th and 26th rounds: K27, p1, k18, p1, k23. [70 sts]

Now set aside the thumb stitches and continue with the main glove as follows:
Next round: K28; slip the next 18 sts on to a safety pin; cast on 2 sts, k24 to complete the round. [54 sts]

Work 2 rounds straight.

Cut 6 lengths of contrast wool, about 28 inches in length, and 6 of main shade; do not use bobbins, just the lengths of wool.
Work the first row of the pattern from the chart, as follows, joining in the lengths of wool as required, repeating the 9 pattern sts 6 times:
[Editor's note: You are now going to split the knitting and work back and forth in knit and purl rows. This is in order to insert the hearts nicely using the intarsia method. I tried the Fair Isle technique but the red contrast colour showed through the white, and did not look attractive. This method does mean a little more sewing in of ends but I think the result is worth it.
You will join the round up as you reach the end of each row.]

Row 1: K4 from the ball of main shade, k1 using first strand of contrast yarn, k8 using first strand of main shade, k1 contrast using second strand of contrast, k8 using second strand of main shade, and so on the the last 4 sts; k3 in last strand of main shade, slip the last st. Still using the last working needle, pick up the st below the first st of the round and knit into it, then pass the slipped st over this st. Turn the work.

[Editor's note: Use the pop-up from the above picture for more detailed photos of this technique.]

Row 2: P3 in main shade, p3 in contrast, p6 in main shade, and so on; use the intarsia method and twist the two yarns together when you change colour. Continue in this way until you get to the last stitch in the row, and slip this stitch. Still using the first working needle, pick up the st below the last st of the round and purl into it, then pass the slipped st over this st. Turn the work.
Continue until all 6 pattern rows have been worked from the chart.

Now go back to working in the round, and continue in main shade only, using the main ball of wool.
Next round: K1, m1; knit to last 2 sts, m1, k1. Work 3 more rounds straight.

Divide for fingers

Next round (forefinger): Knit the first 20 sts of the round and place on a stitch holder; place the last 20sts of the round on a second stitch holder; Knit 16; cast on 2 sts. [18 sts]
Distribute these 18sts evenly across 3 needles, and join in a round.
Knit 5 rounds on these 18 sts.
Cast off purlwise.

Next round (middle finger): Slip the last 7sts on the first stitch holder (the ones nearest to the forefinger) onto a needle and knit them; pick up and knit 2 from the cast on sts at the base of the forefinger; slip the first 7sts on the second stitch holder (the ones nearest to the forefinger) onto a needle and knit them; cast on 2 sts. [18 sts].
Distribute these 18 sts evenly across 3 needles, and join in a round.
Knit 5 rounds on these 18 sts.
Cast off purlwise.

Next round (third finger): Work and complete as for middle finger.

Next round (little finger): Pick up 2 sts at the base third finger; slip the remaining 6 sts on the second stitch holder onto a needle and knit them; slip the remaining 6 sts on the first stitch holder onto a needle and knit them. [14sts]
Distribute the 14 sts evenly across 3 needles, and work 4 rounds.
Cast off purlwise.

Thumb:
Next round: Transfer the18 thumb sts from the safety pin back on the needles and knit them, then pick up 2 sts from the sts cast on to continue the main glove. Arrange these 20 sts on 3 needles joining in a round.
Knit 5 rounds on these 20 sts.
Cast off purlwise.

LEFT GLOVE:
Work as for the right glove until you reach the working for the thumb gusset then work as follows:

1st round: K20, p1, k2, p1, k24.
2nd round: as round 1.
3rd round: K20, p1, m1, (make a stitch by picking up the horizontal loop between lying before the next stitch and working into the back of it), k2, m1,p1, k24.
4th and 5th rounds: K24, p1, k4, p1, k20.

Continue in this way as for right glove, but following the stitch layout as set until you reach row 25.

25th and 26th rounds: K23, p1, k18, p1, k27. [70 sts]

Now set aside the thumb stitches and continue with the main glove as follows:
Next round: K24; slip the next 18 sts on to a safety pin; cast on 2 sts, k28 to complete the round. [54 sts]

Once you have set the position of the thumb, you can work the rest of the left glove exactly as for the right glove.

Making up:
Sew in all ends.

Materials

Example shown is knitted in 1 x 50g ball 4 ply in main shade, and small amount of contast colour.

One set of 4 No. 12 (2½ mm) needles.

Tension

Approx. 32sts and 44 rows to 4 inches on No 12 needles.

Size matters

Width all round above thumb, 7 ins. To alter the size use larger or smaller needles as required.

A word on the wool

The wool I used was from my store room.
If I purchased the wool new, then I would probably try Rowan 4 ply soft.
You need so little of the contrast it hardly seems worth buying a whole ball.

Intarsia

Here is a nice little video clip about intarsia knitting. Don't be put off by her continental knitting method.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.


ValentineIntarsiaMit3.jpg


Intarsia.

Text and Pictures taken from Ethknits "How to knit" page.

Hold the working yarn in your right hand and the yarn to be woven in your left.

Changing on a knit row: Knit with yarn A until you want to change. Pull yarn A over to the left and wrap yarn B across the back of A as you knit the next stitch.

Changing on a purl row: Purl with yarn A until you want to change. Pull yarn A over to left and wrap yarn B under A as you bring it across to purl the next stitch.

You can see from the purl row picture that the edge resembles a sideways knitted row as on each row you cross the yarns over. This way you should get no holes. Don't worry if you see holes where the yarn is loose in some places. When you finish your work you will have lots of ends to sew in and you can pull these tight and sew up any holes that still appear.

December 2008

Plum Pudding Cosy

PuddingCosy3.jpg

A last minute novelty gift from 1960.
It is crocheted with a double thickness of wool; this can be a nuisance but it is a good way to get that tweedy pudding-mix effect.
"Quick-as-lightening fillers for amusing family presents."

Instructions

The pattern includes a tea-cosy in the shape of a Christmas Pudding, and a tea-pot stand in the shape of a plate.

Cosy

Using wool double, with No 7 hook and using the brown and tan wools together (to make a tweedy effect), make 4 chain and join into a ring with a slip stitch. Work 8dc into ring.

1st round: (2dc into each dc) 8 times [16 dc]
Mark the end of the round with a coloured thread.
[Editor's note: You just weave a piece of coloured thread between the last and first sts of each round such that you can just pull it out when you have finished.]
2nd round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next dc) 8 times [24 dc]
3rd round: 1dc in next dc all round.
4th round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 2 dc) 8 times [32 dc]
5th round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 3dc) 8 times [40 dc]
6th round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 4dc) 8 times [48 dc]
7th and 8th rounds: 1dc in next dc all round.
9th round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 5dc) 8 times [56 dc]
10th and 11th rounds: 1dc in next dc all round.

Start opening for handle by turning the work and working backwards and forwards in rows.

12th row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next dc all across to back to start of round [56 dc]. Turn with 1ch.
13th row: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 6dc) 8 times [64 dc]. Turn with 1ch.

Start opening for spout, working each side of cosy separately.
[Editor's note: I have altered the pattern here and started the spout opening 3 rows higher than intended in the original. Even with this alteration, the cosy fits only a conventional teapot, where the spout comes from the base of the pot. It does not fit my deco teapot design where the spout is high up the pot, on a level with the handle.]

††
14th row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next dc 32 times [32 dc]. Turn with 1ch.
15th row: with right side facing 1dc in next dc 32 times. Turn with 1ch.
16th row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next dc 32 times. Turn with 1ch.
17th row: with right side facing 1dc in next dc 32 times. Turn with 1ch.
18th row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next 15 dc; 2 dc into next dc; 1dc in next 16 dc [33 dc]. Turn with 1ch.
19th row: with right side facing 1dc in next dc 33 times. Turn with 1ch.
20th row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next 16 dc; 2 dc into next dc; 1dc in next 16 dc [34 dc]. Turn with 1ch.
21st row: with right side facing 1dc in next dc 34 times. Turn with 1ch.
22nd row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next 16 dc; 2 dc into next dc; 1dc in next 17 dc [35 dc]. Break wool.
††

[Editor's note: Here's a picture of the cosy with one side worked, showing the coloured thread marking the early rounds.]

Rejoin wool at spout end to work the other side of the cosy. With right side facing, repeat from †† to ††. Join spout opening with one slip stitch. 1ch; turn the work.

With right side facing, return to working in rounds. Work 3 rounds of dc, joining handle opening in first round.

Turn the work, and crochet one round of slip stitches. Fasten off.

Icing

With number 7 hook and white bouclé wool used single, work as for first 6 increase rounds of the plate, [56dc].

Next round: * 1dc in next dc; 4 tr in next dc; 1dc into each of the next 3dc; repeat from * 9 times. Fasten off.

[Editor's note: I extemporised with the crochet here. You can form "realistic" icing/snow either with extra rows of long and short crochet stitches, or by adding embroidery when you stitch the icing in place on the cosy.]

Making up:

Stitch icing to top of cosy, and use white bouclé wool to embroider irregular shapes round edge of icing. Using black wool embroider spots on cosy to represent currants as required.
Sew holly decoration to top of pudding.

Sew in all ends.

Plate (not shown)

Using wool double, with No 7 hook and white, make 4 chain and join into a ring with a slip stitch.

1st round: 1ch, 8dc into ring; 1 slip stitch into top of 1st dc.
[Editor's note: Mark the end of the rounds with a coloured thread, as before.]
2nd round: (2dc into each dc) 8 times [16 dc]
3rd round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next dc) 8 times [24 dc]
4th round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 2 dc) 8 times [32 dc]

Continue increasing in this way, 8 sts in every round, until 8 rounds have been worked from the start [64 dc].
Work 5 rounds without shaping.
Change to number 10 hook and continue with single wool rim:-

Next round: * 2 dc in next dc; repeat from * to end of round [128 dc].
Next round: 1dc in next dc all round.
Next round: 1 dc in each of next 2 dc; * 2 dc in next dc; 1 dc into each of next 20 dc; repeat from * to end of round.

Work 2 rounds without shaping.

Join in red, and work 1 round. Fasten off red wool.

Turn the work and with wrong side facing, using white wool double, work 1 round of slip stitches into last round of dc. Fasten off white wool.

Press plate lightly. Thread a length of white wool through last round of base - that is before the start of the rim - and fasten off securely. This will retain the shape of the plate.

Materials

50g balls each in dark brown and tan double knitting wool, (used double throughout), and one ball of a white bouclé double knitting wool for the icing. Scraps of red and black for stripes on the plate.

Holly sprig decorations in paper or plastic.

One each Nos. 7 (4.5mm) and 10 (3¼mm) crochet hooks.

Crochet abbreviations:

ch = chain
tr = treble crochet
dc = double crochet

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Tension

4dc to an inch.
Note:
these are UK crochet instructions - to work a double crochet: insert hook in next stitch, draw loop through, wool over hook, and draw through both loops.

Size matters

Intended to fit a 2 pint pot (that's UK pints which are each 20 fluid ounces not 16). Check out the diagram with the dimensions of my cosy.

A word on the wool.

I used a vintage tweed DK (used double) which was a perfect "pudding" colour, being a rich brown and having flecks of different colours, so I did not need to use two different colours to work together.
I did not have any bouclé wool, so used a smooth wool; however Stylecraft seem to offer come resonably prices bouclé double knits (eg Carousel or Sirocco).

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

PuddingCosy4.jpg



Pattern adaptations:

If you would prefer to make a knitted cosy for the main body rather than crochet then here are some instructions for a ribbed cosy. You can still make the white top and holly using crochet as before, and fasten it only in the centre on top of the cosy, which will allow the ribs to adapt nicely to the shape of the teapot.

The cosy is worked in double knitting wool used singly on No 8 (4mm) needles. [The crocheted cosy is worked with two different coloured DK wools worked together to give a tweedy "pudding" effect. I used a flecked wool for my cosy which would work well for this knitted pattern.].

Measurements: width all tround 16 inches, height 6 inches.
Tension: 12 sts and 17 rows to 2 inches measured over pattern.

Instructions:
**
Cast on 47 sts and work in pattern as follows:
1st row: K3, * p2, k2; repeat from * to end
2nd row: K1, * p2, k2; repeat from * to last 2 sts, p1, k1.
These two rows form the pattern. Continue until work measures 5 inches, ending with a second row.

Shape Top:
1st row: * K2tog, k1, p1; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1. [35 sts]
2nd row: K1, * p1, k2; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.
3rd row: K2, * p1,k2; repeat from * to end.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: * K1, p2tog; repeat from * to last 2sts, k2. [24 sts]
6th-8th rows: * K1, p1; repeat from * to last 2sts, k2.
9th row: K1,* k2tog; repeat from * to last stitch, k1. [13 sts]
10th row: K1, purl to last stitch, k1.
11th row: K2tog 6 times, k1. [7 sts]
**

Break yarn and leave sts on a safety pin.
Work a second piece from ** to **. Break yarn and leaving an end. Thread through sts on needle and then through the 7 sts on the safety pin. Draw up tightly and fasten off.
Sew up the sides, leaving an opening for handle and spout.
[Editor's note: This design allows you to sew the front an back seams, and allow handle and spout openings to exactly match your teapot.]

Decorate with the crochet icing and holly as desired, but leave edges of icing free.

November 2008

Gold Mesh Bag

GoldBag.jpg

From November 1940:
"This pretty gold mesh bag will rejoice the hearts of those can still enjoy a little social life. Personally we are at this moment sitting in an air-raid shelter!"
One wonders if that was literally true - but I am sure the editorial team spent a lot of their time in shelters in this period of history in the UK.

Instructions

Starting at the top make 37 chain.

1st row: Miss 2 ch; 35tr; turn with 2ch.
2nd row: 35tr, working into the front of each st; turn with 2ch.
3rd row: 35tr, working into the back of each st (right side facing); turn with 2ch.
4th row: as second, but make 5ch at the end of this row; pull through thread and fasten off. Cut the thread.
[Editor's note: This is the piece of work that fits into the metal frame. Your 35 treble need to be as wide as the handle frame and your 4 rows need to be as deep as the frame. My frame was roughly 5 x 2 inches; my width was OK but I needed to add in 2 rows to make the length, so I repeated rows 2 and 3 before moving on to row 4 as above, making 6 rows in all. Beware if you make a odd number of rows as there is a "right side" to this work - working into the front and back of the sts makes ribs on the right side.
I thought I would have to
add width as well (the frame size stated as 5¾ins and my work was barely 5); however, once I got the frame it was clear that my work fitted perfectly as the insertion width was about 5¼ins plus you do need the work to be very slightly stretched, not relaxed.
My advice is get the frame in your hot little hand first and make the bag to fit.

Be careful if you do add chain to make the bag wider, as you will need to be able to make the shell pattern fit later on. I varied my crochet hook size until I got a satisfactory tension to achieve the right width, rather than adding in sts.]

Now make a second piece exactly the same, and at the end of the final row, make 5ch, and then join the two pieces together by working across the first piece to end of 5ch in slipstitch, then slipstitch across 2nd piece, making a round.

Now change to pattern and work backwards and forwards in rows,
[Editor's note: This confused me at first - but you are "working backwards and forwards" and slip stitching at the end of each row to join the round.]
working into the back of each stitch as follows:

1st row: 1ch; 3dc into 3rd of 5 ch; 3dc into first space * miss 2 spaces; 3 dc into next space; repeat from * across all trebles; then 3dc into 3rd of 5 ch; work across the other side as for the first [27 groups]. Slipstitch into the middle of 3dc made on the 5ch. Turn.

2nd row: (1dc, 1tr, 1dc) into middle of each group of 3dc. Turn with a slipstitch to the next treble.

3rd row: 1dc into same treble as slipstitch, * (1dc, 3tr, 1dc) into next group, 1dc into centre of next group, * repeat from * to * once.
Work a group of (1dc, 3tr, 1dc) into each of the next 3 groups; repeat from * to * twice.
Work a group of (1dc, 3tr, 1dc) into each of the next 2 groups.
[Editor's note: This completes one "side"; it seems asymmetrical as you have one shell group designed to sit on the side of the bag.]
Work the other side of the bag to correspond.
There should now be 18 shell groups of (1dc, 3tr, 1dc) in all.
Turn with a slipstitch into second treble.

4th row: (1dc, 5tr, 1dc) into the middle of each group; turn with a slipstitch into second treble.
5th row: As 4th.

6th row: (1dc, 7tr, 1dc) into the middle of each group; turn with a slipstitch into second treble.
7th row-10th row: As 6th.

Now pinch the two sides of the bag together at the bottom edge and slipstitch across from one side to the other, taking two outside scallops together, to join. The scallops that were on the "side" of the bag are twisted slightly to accomplish this, joining 9 full scallops and avoiding a half-scallop at the sides of this edge.
Fasten off.

Making up:

Sew in all ends.
Sew bag to frame. You are intended to "draw up the work at the sides" so that it fits over the hinges, but as my work was lightly stretch over the frame - and I think due to the design of the frame - I could not make this work, and the hinges are exposed in the finished bag.
[Editor's note: Some frames have no holes in them for sewing and you are intended to glue the fabric in place; check carefully before you purchase.]
Make a fabric lining; I used a fine corded velvet (a remnant) in black.

If your frame has fasteners designed for a cord handle, make a cord or buy a fine chain to form the handle. I made a kumihimo cord, as this is a current interest of mine.

Materials

Example shown is made from 2 balls of Twilleys Goldfingering.

Bag handles from Bags of Handles
[see under 'frames'].
I used this one.

One No. 11 (3mm) crochet hook.

Fabric remnant for lining.

Crochet abbreviations:

ch = chain
tr = treble crochet
dc = double crochet

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Tension

No tension given - my 37 treble worked out to 5 inches when not eased out on frame.

Size matters

Fits 5¼ inch width handle.
My advice is get the frame first and make the bag to fit, by varying the hook size or adding stitches.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

September 2008

Trekking Socks

LynsSocks1.jpg

My sister was going on a summer trekking holiday and wanted some suitable socks to wear in her riding boots. I have created these simple socks in soft wool/cotton double knitting to meet the needs for a thick summer sock. I can't say how well the wool/cotton will wear as a sock wool, but the double knitting weight means they take about 5 minutes to knit (OK maybe a bit longer...).
I made the largest size for my sister (UK shoe size 5 or 6) - the smaller sizes are intended for children. You can wear the tops extended if used under riding boots, or rolled down if, perhaps, wearing shorts with heavy hiking boots.

Instructions (work 2 alike).

Cast on 36 (40;44;48) stitches loosely; divide over 3 needles and join in a round.

Work 35 rounds in k2, p2 rib (or required length).

Next Round: K1, make 1 by picking up bar between sts and knitting into the back of it; knit to last st; make 1, k1. [38 (42;46;50) sts]

Knit 5 rounds straight.

Divide for heel

Next Round: K9 (10;11;12), and then slip the last 10 sts of the round onto the other end of the same needle - these 19 (21;23;25) sts are for the heel. Divide the remaining sts between two needles, and leave for the instep.

Commence Heel

1st Row: Slip 1 purlwise, purl to end.

2nd Row: Slip 1 knitwise. * K1, keeping yarn at back of work, slip 1 purlwise; repeat from * to last 2 sts; k2.

Repeat these 2 rows 8 (9;10;11) times more, then the first row again.

Turn Heel

1st Row: K13 (14;15;16) sts, slip 1, k1, psso (pass the slipped stitch over), turn.

2nd Row: Slip 1, p7, p2tog, turn.

3rd Row: Slip 1, k7, slip 1, k1, psso, turn.

Repeat the 2nd and 3rd rows 3 (4;5;6) times more, then the 2nd row once.

K5, thus completing the heel. 4 sts remain unworked on the left-hand needle.

Using spare needle, knit 4 heel sts, pick up and knit 10 (12;14;16) sts along side of heel. Slip all instep sts on to one needle, and using 2nd needle knit across instep sts. Using 3rd needle, pick up and knit 10 (12;14;16) sts along side of heel, then knit 5 heel sts. [48 (54;60;66) sts].

Shape instep:

1st round: Knit.

2nd round: 1st needle: knit to the last 3sts, k2tog, k1.
2nd needle: Knit. 3rd needle: K1, slip1, k1, psso knit to end.

Repeat these two rounds until 38 (42;46;50) sts remain.

Continue on these sts until work measures 4¼(5;5¾;6½) inches, or desired length, from where sts were knitted up at the heel.

Shape Toe:

1st round: 1st needle: knit to the last 3sts, k2tog, k1.
2nd needle: K1, slip1, k1, psso knit to the last 3sts, k2tog, k1.
3rd needle: K1, slip1, k1, psso knit to end.

2nd round: Knit.

Repeat these 2 rounds until 18 sts remain.

Making Up

Knit sts from 1st needle on to end of 3rd needle.
Graft sts together. Sew in ends. Press.

Materials

2 x 50g balls Rowan Wool Cotton , shade 930, "Riviera".

One set of 4 number 9 (3¾mm) needles.

Tension

24st and 32 rows to four inches on No 9 needles.

Size matters

Length of foot approximately 7½(8½;9½;10½) inches (adjustable).

A word on the wool.

Wool Cotton is possibly my favourite Rowan yarn; a 50/50 blend of soft Merino wool and cotton. I am not sure how well it will stand up to wear and tear in a sock, but the cotton should improve durability.
However, my sister reports that although they were fine (soft and lovely) while riding, they "felt like walking on a string bag" - which I have noticed myself with other handknit cotton socks and probably these are worse being larger gauge. So - either wear a thin cotton inner sock, or stick with conventional DK sock wool.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

LynsSocks2.jpg

Here's a picture of the socks "in use". Left to right - my sister at the rear on the grey, Susanna, Liz, and leading on the palamino, Tom, the guide.

LynTrekking2.jpg

Llanthony Riding and Trekking is based at Court Farm, next to Llanthony Priory; here's the full picture (from which the detail above is taken) showing the fabulous scenery and environment in Wales. Lyn strongly recommends the bed and breakfast accommodation that she enjoyed at Pen-y-dre Farm

LynTrekking3.jpg

August 2008

Seaside Caps

CapPlain1.jpg CapPlain2.jpg

"Capped to catch the eye" in 1952. This cap can be "worn with a purpose on windy days for cliff-top walks or out at sea, or just for extra prettiness at any time". "Leave it plain or dot with beads" - and - "for teenagers only - roll up the brim in jaunty sailor style".
Luvvly.

Instructions.

Instructions are for 2 versions - one plain and one with striped brim.
Both crowns are worked the same.

Crown
Begin at centre crown. With number 11 hook, make 4 chain, join in a ring with slip stitch. Work 6 dc through centre of ring.
In all following rounds, work through the back loop only of each dc to get a ridged effect, and mark the start of each round with coloured thread to check increasings.
[Editor's note: You just weave a piece of coloured thread between the last and first sts of each round such that you can just pull it out when you have finished.]

1st Round: * 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end.
2nd Round: * 1 dc in 1 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end. [18 dc]
3rd Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) twice, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end. [24 dc]
4th Round: As 3rd round. [32 dc]

5th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) three times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end. [40 dc]
6th Round: As 5th round. [50 dc]

7th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) four times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end. [60 dc]
8th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) five times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end. [70 dc]
9th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) six times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end. [80 dc]
10th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) seven times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end. [90 dc]
11th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) eight times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end. [100 dc]

12th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) fourteen times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to last 10 dc; (1 dc in 1 dc) ten times. [106 dc]
13th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) fourteen times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to last dc; 1 dc in 1 dc. [113 dc]
14th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) fifteen times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to last dc; 1 dc in 1 dc. [120 dc]
15th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) nineteen times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end. [126 dc]
16th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) twenty times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end. [132 dc]
17th Round: * (1 dc in 1 dc) twenty times, 2 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to last 6 dc; (1 dc in 1 dc) six times. [138 dc]
18th Round: * 1 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end.

19th-34th Round: As 18th round.

This completes the crown.

Striped Brim

With number 11 hook, and white yarn, make 23 chain, turn.

Miss 1 ch 1 dc in each of 22 ch.
Next Row: * 1 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end.

††

Join in contrast.
Next Row: Miss 1 dc, * 1 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to last dc, 2 dc in last dc.
Next Row: * 1 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end.Join in white.
Next Row: Miss 1 dc, * 1 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to last dc, 2 dc in last dc.
Next Row: * 1 dc in 1 dc; repeat from * to end.
††

Continue repeating from †† to †† until strip fits all round the lower edge of the crown. Do not stretch this strip but allow it to fit comfortably. End with 2 rows of contrast colour. Fasten off.

Finishing:
Fasten off the crown section.
Join short ends of striped brim. Pin in position round edge of crown, right side of brim to right side of crown. Oversew neatly with matching cotton; fold brim in half, and slip stitch to edge of crown on wrong side.
Sew in ends.

Plain Brim

This is worked with the yarn doubled.
Join a second strand of yarn in with the crown section, and using a number 10 hook, work 9 rounds of dc, but always working through both front and back loops of each dc in the row below.
Finish off with a row of slip stitches, but take care not to do this too tightly or the brim will be too small.

Sew in ends and optionally embroider 5 rows of beads around the crown, as shown in the photograph.
[Editor's note: I omitted the beads. You can use any free format style here that you like - for example a collection of small buttons.]

Materials

Plain: 2 x 50g ball Phildar Phil Crochet, in white, (100% cotton, 201yards).
Optional assortment of coloured glass beads.

Striped: 1 x 50g ball
in main shade, (07 Veronese), with 1 x 50g ball of contrast (white).

3 balls (2 in white) made both hat versions.

Nos. 11 (3mm) and 10 (3¼mm) crochet hooks.

Crochet abbreviations:

ch = chain
dc = double crochet

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet, and so on - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Tension

7 dc to an inch. Check the tension and your head measurement carefully; the original was made in angora which is more stretchy than pure cotton.
Note: these are UK crochet instructions - to work a double crochet: insert hook in next stitch, draw loop through, wool over hook, and draw through both loops.

Size matters

To fit "an average head". However, the hat size can vary quite a lot according to your tension.

A word on the wool.

Original specified 2 x ½oz balls of Patons Fuzzy Wuzzy Angora.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

Striped-brim version, and modelled original:



I was so taken with the another seaside idea on the same page as the hat that I felt compelled to share it with you here as well.

Scarf on Holiday...


...to make a girl look prettier than ever




.....TIED AT THE BACK it makes a snug bolero....

As a change from the everlasting headsquare, buy a yard of rayon or silk - ours was a yard of spotted rayon at 5/6d,
[Editor's note: For you whipper snappers out there, that's 27½p or about 60 cents.]
but silk is best if you can afford it, as it's less slippery - cut it in half lengthways, join the short ends neatly, slip hem the long raw edges, and you have a manoueverable long stole, which can be worn in all sorts of ways and is so much prettier and smarter than a triangle tied under your chin.
[Editor's note: I'm with them on that one.]





AS A CARDIGAN - round your shoulders, ends tucked up and over your belt in two comfortable pockets.

Carry it around on holiday and it will be a godsend for those chilly moments, and less bother to carry than a cardigan. Tie it round tyour waist as a sash when you don't want to carry it.

April 2008

Fisherman’s Rib Hat

FishermanHat.jpg

This is my favourite hat of the three this month. It's simple, warm, comfortable, and looks like a serious seafarer's hat! Even though I don't like knitting rib that much, and Fisherman's rib means you have to put in a lot more knitting to get the length you need.... it was nonetheless very satisfying.

Instructions

With No. 6 (5mm) circular needle cast on 68 stitches, and join into a round, and purl the first round. Place a stitch marker to mark the beginning of the round.
Editor's note: Often when you cast on it tends to be tighter and have less give than the knitting, so with a hat band you need to make an effort to cast on loosely, especially if designed to fold back. Ravelry knitter kellyincville commented that it she would do the cast on and do the first row with a larger needle, which is excellent advice for this hat.
Now work in Fisherman's rib stitch as follows:

1st round: * K1B (knit one below, by knitting into the stitch below the next stitch, and slipping both sts off the needle together); p1. Repeat from * to end of round.
2nd round: * K1; P1B, (Purl one below). Repeat from * to end of round.

These 2 rounds form the pattern. Continue in pattern until work measures 9inches from the beginning, ending with round 2.

Shape Crown as follows, keeping continuity of the pattern:
Editor's note: Ravelry knitter kellyincville noted that when you get to the k1/p1 rib used for these decreases, the ribbing is noticeably tighter than the the fisherman's rib. I regarded this as part of the crown pattern, which is only just visible in the photo, but she points out that you could go up a size on the needles to compensate.

Next round: (K3tog; p1,k1,p1) 11 times; k2tog. [45 sts]
Next 3 rounds: K1, p1, rib to last st, k1. [45 sts]
Next round: (K3tog; p3tog) 7times; k3tog. [15 sts]
Next 3 rounds: K1, p1, rib to last st, k1. [15 sts]
Next round: (K3tog; p3tog) twice; k3tog. [5 sts]
Next round: K1, p1, k1, p1, k1. [5 sts]

Break yarn, thread through remaining sts; draw up and fasten off securely.

Making up:
Sew in all ends, and turn back brim as required.

Changing the hat size, or substituting the wool.

You may want to alter the size (circumference) of your hat, or compensate for a different gauge.

Simply work out how many sts you need to cast on according to your own gauge eg divide the number of sts by 16 and multiply by the number of sts you knit to 4 inches.
To work in Fisherman's rib, you need an even number of stitches.

A word on the wool.

If you work in pure wool you may need more than my stated quantities of yarn. Fisherman's rib is a very yarn-hungry stitch which produces a satisfying elasticated bulky fabric, by effectively knitting the yarn double, (nice and warm!).

Original pattern called for 3 x 50g balls Patons Husky Chunky, which is a pure wool chunky; the blend I used, no doubt, has a better yardage.
Patons Husky Chunky knitted to a tension of 7.5sts and 10 rows to 2 inches.

Materials

Example shown is knitted in 3 x 40g balls of vintage Argyll Ferndale Shetland Chunky (an acrylic and wool blend).

Size 6 (5mm) and circular needle - short length suitable for a hat.

Tension

Approx. 8st to 2 inches on No 6 (5mm) needles.

Size matters

There is a lot of give in the ribbed stitch, making the sizing very flexible.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

Moss and Blackberry Stitch Hat

MossHat.jpg

A 1970s hat using blackberry stitch, with a moss stitch brim. George did not think this was very "manly", but I leave that artistic decision to you, [George has also had experience of "life on the ocean wave" and says that as long as it's warm it will be welcome].

Instructions

With No. 6 (5mm) circular needle cast on 89 stitches, and work in rounds of k1, p1, moss stitch for 3 inches. Increase 7sts evenly across the last row. [96 sts]

Change to No. 4 (6mm) circular needle and work pattern as follows:

[Editor's note: this pattern (blackberry stitch) is worked over groups of 4 sts, and the hat is knitted up from the wrong side throughout.]

1st round: (wrong side) Knit.
2nd round: * P3tog; (k1,p1,k1) into the next st. Repeat from * to end of round.
3rd round: as first
4th round: * (k1,p1,k1) into the next st; p3tog. Repeat from * to end of round.

These 4 rows form the pattern. Continue in pattern until work measures 8½ inches from the beginning, ending with round 4.

Shape Top as follows, keeping continuity of the pattern:

Next round: K1 *k2, k2tog. Repeat from * to last st., k1. [72 sts]
Work 3 pattern rounds 2, 3 and 4.
[Editor's note: You can't keep the pattern bobbles in line with the previous work during the decreasings; just make the bobbles evenly across the rounds as before.]

Next round: *K2tog, k1. Repeat from * to end of round. [48 sts]
Work 3 pattern rounds.
Next round: *K2tog. Repeat from * to end of round. [24 sts]
Work 3 pattern rounds.
Next round: *K2tog. Repeat from * to end of round. [12 sts]
Work 1 round.

Break yarn, thread through remaining sts; draw up and fasten off securely.

Making up:
Sew in all ends.

Changing the hat size, or substituting the wool.

You may want to alter the size (circumference) of your hat, or compensate for a different gauge.

Simply work out how many sts you need to cast on according to your own gauge eg divide the number of sts by 18 and multiply by the number of sts you knit to 4 inches.
To work in moss stitch, you need to use an odd number of sts and work k1,p1 on every round.

Do the same calculation when increasing for the blackberry stitch, taking note that your number of sts needs to be divisible by 4.

Example: I have a gauge of 18 sts to 4 inches on no UK 6 (5mm) needles.
You have a gauge of, say, 15 sts to 4 inches (that is: your wool is thicker than mine).

Cast on 89 sts becomes 89/18*15 = 74, and you cast on 75, as it needs to be an odd number.

Increase evenly to 96 sts becomes 96/18*15 = 80.
For this hat, you need the number of stitches picked up to be divisible by 4, and 80 is exactly divisible by 4 so you are OK.
If not add or subtract a couple of sts until you get a number divisible by 4.

Materials

Example shown is knitted in 2x 50g balls of vintage Richard Poppleton Emmerdale Chunky Tweed (an acrylic and wool blend).

Size 6 (5mm) and size 4 (6mm) circular needles - short length suitable for a hat.

Tension

Approx. 9st to 2 inches on No 6 needles.

Size matters

This hat worked out to about 22 inches head circumference. My estimate is that "to fit an average sized head" means 22/23 inches for a man's size and 20-22 inches for a woman's size.
See "altering the size" below.

A word on the wool.

Original pattern called for Patons Husky Chunky, which was, I think a pure wool chunky, somewhat bulkier than the one I used.
It knitted to a tension of 7.5sts and 10 rows to 2 inches. However, the implied hat size was very large, so I have not altered the original pattern sts according to my gauge, but have allowed the hat to knit up slightly smaller than the original.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

Cable Band Hat

CableBandHat.jpg

This 1970s style hat is constructed by knitting a cabled band and then picking up stitches to knit the rest of the hat - which in this example is ribbed. This version is is not intended to have a turned back brim; if you want one, then you must knit the rib section longer; you will not have to reverse any workings as the rib section is reversible, so could be worn either way out. The single layer construction is very economic on yarn; For my wool/acrylic blend, I used 58g.

Instructions

With No. 5 (5½mm) needles cast on 11 stitches, and work in cable pattern as follows:
[Editor's note: I cast on with waste wool, so I could remove it later and graft the ends of the band together.]

1st row: (wrong side) K3, p6, k2.
2nd row: P2, k6, p1, k2.
Repeat 1st and second rows twice more, then the 1st row again.

8th row: (right side facing) P2, cable 6 (slip the first 3 sts onto a cable needle and leave at the front of the work; k3, then k3 from cable needle); p1, k2.

9th - 14th rows: Repeat 1st and second rows 3 times.

Repeat 1st - 14th rows 8 times more (9 patterns in all) ending with row 13. Graft the sts to the cast-on edge to form a circular band, [or cast off the 11 sts and sew the cast-on to the cast-off edge].

[Editor's note: If you want to alter the size (circumference) of your hat, now is the time to do it. Lengthen or shorten this band to the circumference you want to achieve. See "altering the size" below.]

One edge of the band has a neat "finished" garter st edging and the other has a reverse stocking stitch edge, which you will use to continue knitting the hat in the round.
Change to number 6 (5mm) circular needle and, with right side of work facing, pick up 92 sts evenly around the reverse stocking stitch edge.

Work in rounds of k2, p2 rib for 5 inches (about 28) rows.

Shape Crown as follows:

1st round: *K2tog, p2. Repeat from * to end of round.
2nd round: *K1, p2. Repeat from * to end of round.

Repeat rounds 2 five times more.

8th round: *K1, p2tog. Repeat from * to end of round.
9th round: *slip1, k2tog, pass the slipped st over; p1. Repeat from * to end of round.

Break yarn, thread through remaining sts; draw up and fasten off securely.

Making up:
Sew in all ends.

Changing the hat size, or substituting the wool.

You may want to alter the size (circumference) of your hat, or compensate for a different gauge.

This pattern relies on making an even number of cables around the hat, so to lengthen or shorten the band, you can either add in whole or partial pattern repeats, or, if you feel up to it, you could alter the number of rows in the pattern repeat of the cable.

Test your gauge before you start and work out how many rows you need to make your chosen head circumference size. Start by dividing the number of rows you calculate by 14, and then try some other numbers, eg 12, 16, 13, or 15, until you are close to getting an exact number of patterns. [Note that if you choose to work to an uneven number of rows in the repeat, then you will end up doing your cable operations on purl rows, which is quite feasible, but approach with caution if your are a beginner in this field!]

If the above all sounds hopeless to you, then just knit until the band is the length you require, and just sew the ends of the band together rather than trying to graft it. You could even work the hat on two needles instead of in the round, by picking up the stitches from the band before you sew it up, - and then, when you have finished, you sew a side seam into the hat, including the band.

Finally if you are altering the size, or compensating for a different gauge, you will probably need to pick up a different number of stitches from the band. I usually pick up a number of stitches equal to three quarters of the number of rows I have knitted.
Example: I knitted 9 pattern repeats of 14 rows which equals 126 rows in total. Then 126*3/4 = 94.5.
For this hat, you need the number of stitches picked up to be divisible by 4, and I chose to pick up 92sts. I could equally have chosen 96.

Materials

Example shown is knitted in 2x 50g balls of vintage Richard Poppleton Emmerdale Chunky Tweed (an acrylic and wool blend).

Two size 5 (5½mm) needles and a size 6 (5mm) circular needle - short length suitable for a hat.

Tension

Approx. 9st to 2 inches on No 6 needles.

Size matters

This hat worked out to about 22 inches head circumference. My estimate is that "to fit an average sized head" means 22/23 inches for a man's size and 20-22 inches for a woman's size.
See "altering the size" below.

A word on the wool.

Original pattern called for Patons Double plus, which was a double knitting wool, and the instructions were to knit the yarn double, producing a tension of 7.5sts and 10 rows to 2 inches.
The hat was "unisex" but shown modelled on a woman.
I have compensated for changing the wool, and made the hat slightly larger - my own version is printed here, not the original.
The original instructions were to knit 8 pattern repeats for the band, and to pick up 86 sts for the hat, which was not knitted in the round.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

March 2008

Easter Bunnies - slippers

BunnySlippers.jpg

A charming pattern from Alison for a pair of child's slippers, first knitted for her niece, Nancy.

©Alison Pate 2007

Instructions

Work two slippers the same as follows:

Sole and foot - Cast on 28 sts in white
Knit in stockinette for 4.5 inches ( this is the length of the foot from the back of the heel to start of toes)

At start of toes k1p1 rib for 2 inches

Next row: p2 tog across entire row (14 sts)
Next row: repeat: p2 tog across entire row (7 sts)

Draw thread through remaining stitches and secure, leaving a long thread. Sew up the edges of the ribbed section to form the toe. The seam is centred along the top of the foot and will be covered later by the head.

Heel - Pick up 10 stitches from middle of cast on row, leaving 18sts (9 on each side of the 10 you have picked up). You will pick up and incorporate these 18 sts as you work the back of the heel.

Work 15 rows on these 10 sts in stockinette as follows:

Row 1: K9; pick up the next st of the cast-on row and knit it together with the last st of the row. Turn.
Row 2: P9; pick up the next st of the cast-on row and purl it together with the last st of the row. Turn

Continue in this way for 12 rows in all.

Row 13: Pick up at a st at the beginning and end of the row, knitting the picked up sts with the first and last st of the row respectively.
Row 14: Pick up at a st at the beginning and end of the row, purling the picked up sts with the first and last st of the row respectively.
Row 15: Pick up at a st at the beginning and end of the row, and K2 tog repeated across the row.

Bind off remaining 6 stitches.

In sewing the toe centre seam, and working the heel you have pulled up the sides to form the slipper shape.

[Editor's note: If the 'cuff' of the slipper is loose you can work a row of single crochet around the edge of the slipper and pull in the shape a little. I used the pink for this.].

Head - knit 2 in white.

Cast on 10 sts.
Next row: Knit twice into every stitch [20 sts].
Work in garter stitch (knit every row) for 1.5 inches.
Next row: K2tog across the row [10 sts].
Bind off leaving long tail.

Using spare yarn, embroider a pink nose, and crescent shapes for closed eyes, using the picture as a guide.

Loosely stuff head and use long tail to sew around edge and pull in making a small flat ball.

Ears - knit 4 in white and 4 in pink

Cast on 2 sts.
Next row: Knit twice into every stitch [4 sts].
Work in garter stitch (knit every row) for 1 inch.
Next row: K2tog across the row [2 sts].
K2tog and bind off.

Sew a white to a pink ear using blanket stitch.

Finishing - Sew ears firmly to back of head at jaunty angle.
Sew head to slippers covering the seam on the toe section.

Tail - (optional) make 2 small pompoms and attach to heels of slipper.

Materials

Dishcloth cotton - white and pink (Lily Sugar n'Cream cotton.).
I used just over one ball of white and a scrap of pink.

1 pair 5mm needles. .

Tension

20 sts and 26 rows to 4 inches measured over stocking stitch on 4½mm needles.

Size matters

Fits feet 7" long (age 4 or so).
To adjust the length - knit the plain stockinette section for longer.
To adjust for width cast on more stitches, make sure you increase the heel pick up stitches in proportion.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

February 2008

Chunky Honeycomb Scarf

Honeycomb_scarf2.jpg

"Reversible scarf for the cold days ahead". This is a very pleasing pattern from October 1963, and is a suggestion for "pre-Christmas plans". The pattern is the same on both sides, so great for a scarf, and can be knitted in basically any wool weight; ensure you use needles a couple of sizes larger than normal for whichever weight you choose, and do a proportional calculation on the gauge, so your scarf is not too wide.

Instructions

Cast on 73 stitches.

First row: K1, * p1, k1; repeat from * to end.

Repeat this row for the moss stitch border 8 times more.

10th (increase) row: Moss 8, (increase in the next st, moss 6) 8 times; increase in the next st, moss 8. [82 sts]

Change to pattern rows as follows:

1st row: moss 5, p3, *k6, p6; repeat from * to last 14sts; k6, p3, moss 5.
2nd row: moss 5, k3, *p6, k6; repeat from * to last 14sts; p6, k3, moss 5.
Repeat the last 2 rows 4 times more.

11th row: moss 5; *slip the next 3 sts on to a cable needle to the back of the work; k3, p3 from cable needle; slip the next 3 sts on to a cable needle to the front of the work; p3, then k3 from cable needle; repeat from * to last 5sts; moss 5.
12th row: as first.
13th row: as second.
14th row: as first.
Repeat the 13th and 14th rows 4 times more.

23rd row: moss 5; *slip the next 3 sts on to a cable needle to the front of the work; p3, then k3 from cable needle; slip the next 3 sts on to a cable needle to the back of the work; k3, p3 from cable needle; repeat from * to last 5sts; moss 5.
24th row: as second.

These 24 rows form the pattern. Continue straight until the work measures 46 ins, ending with a 12th or 24th pattern row.

detail

Next (decrease) row: moss 8 *k2tog; (p1, k1) 3 times; p2tog, repeat from * 3 times more; k2tog; (p1, k1) 4 times. [73sts].

Work 9 rows moss stitch over all stitches.
Cast off.

Finishing - Press work very lighty, taking care not to spoil th texture of the patttern. Cut the remainig wool into 7½ inch lengths; take 3 lengths of wool together each time, fold in half, and, with a crochet hook, knot through short ends to make a fringe. Trim fringe.

Substituting the wool - I used a vintage wool, Phildar Brisants. This is a fine double knitting, which is normally knitted on no. 9 (3¾mm) needles. The cabling make for a tighter tension, and the recommended needles (UK No 6) are 2 sizes larger than usual for a DK. I went with no. 8 needles, instead of 9s, but should have gone larger I think.
My scarf measures less than the 12 inches wide of the original; I knitted to the length I wanted.

If you want to use chunkier wool, then decrease the number of sts proportionally. The pattern is worked over 12sts.

Materials

Original call for 9oz of Patons Moorland Double Knitting

Example shown is knitted in Phildar Brisants.

One pair of No. 6 (5mm) needles.

Tension

Equivalent to 20st and 26rows to 4 inches (10cm) measured over stocking stitch.

Size matters

Width: 12 inches
Length: 46 inches

A word on the wool.

This pattern is for double knitting wool, and from memory Moorland DK was slightly heavy-weight.
You can knit a scarf in anything you want - obviously - see "Substituting the wool".

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

Honeycomb_scarf.jpg

January 2008

Sleeping socks are so cosy

SleepSocks2.jpg

Three offerings this month: this first pattern from 1968 is very similar in design (and the principle of the stretchy fit) to the second offering, Boudoir Boots; however these socks are knitted in a different (more conventional) orientation. They particularly appeal to me, being very jolly, knitted in stripes, (although, as a general rule, I prefer my socks wide awake...).

Instructions

Make two socks alike.

Main body - With main shade (M) cast on 56 stitches, and arrange across 3 needles (19 on each). Work as follows:

Rib round: k5, * p1, k1; repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Repeat this round 10 times more.

**
Round 12: purl to end.
Round 13: k5, purl to end.
Round 14: purl to end.
Round 15: k5; join in contrast colour (C) and knit to the end of the round: turn. [Editor's note: in other words, knit a short round].
Round 16: continuing with C, purl to the last 5sts; turn.
Do not break C, but pick up M.
Row 17: using M knit the C sts of the previous round to end.
**

Repeat from ** to ** 13 times more, and then work the 12th, 13th and 14th pattern rows again

Break C.

Work the toe - Continuing in M only, re-arrange the sts over the 3 double pointed needles as follows:
Toe foundation round - needle one: k1, k2tog, k14. [16 sts]
Toe foundation round - needle two: k the last 2 sts from the first needle, then k19 from the second needle, then k7 from the third needle. [28sts]
Toe foundation round - needle three: k the last 12sts from the third needle [12sts].

You now have 56 sts in the round.
Knit 3 rounds. Begin decreasing for the toe:

Next round: knit to the last 3 sts on the first needle, sl1, k1, psso, k1. Beginning the second needle, k1, k2tog, knit to the last 3 sts on the second needle, sl1, k1, psso, k1. Beginning the third needle, k1, k2tog, knit to end of round, [52 sts].
Next round: knit.

Continue to decrease on every alternate round in this way until 24 sts remain. [8 on the first needle, 12 on the second needle, 4 on the third needle].
Knit the first 8sts from the first needle so that the wool is at the decrease edge of the toe. Do not cast off, but break off wool leaving a tail long enough for grafting (sewing up).

Making up - slip the last 4sts of the round on to the first needle and graft the two sets of 12 sts together to make the toe.
Darn in the ends.

SleepSocks1.jpg

Materials

Original pattern calls for a total of 2 (1oz) balls of 4ply - 1 ball in each colour.

One set of 4 double pointed No 11 needles.

Tension

30st and 38 rows to 4 inches (10cm).

Size matters

One size fits all.

A word on the wool.

Original knitted in Patons 101 Courtelle Crepe in "Venus blue" and "Starlight white".

Example knitted in Phildar Lambswool (51% wool, 49% acrylic), colours rouge and melon.

Tutorial on grafting or Kitchener Stitch.

Boudoir Bedroom Boots

Boudoir_boots.jpg

Second pattern this month from an "Oddments" leaflet for "using up old Scraps of Wool", dating anywhere between the 1930s and the 1950s. Described originally as Lady's Bedsocks*, I hope they will prove to be the perfect partner for Boudoir Bedjacket.

*One of the other patterns was called "Bedroom Boots" and I couldn't resist the alliteration; however, this pattern described here makes footwear that is much more elegant than either "bedsocks" or "boots" implies. They look at their best when on the feet, (as opposed to just after you have knitted them, when they look like a pair of unattractive caterpillars). It is hard for me to date the design, as many patterns were reproduced out of their true era; possibly an expert on publishing could be more accurate.

Instructions

Each sock is worked in one piece. Make two alike.

Commence at the front edge. Using No. 12 needles, cast on 64 stitches, and work 6 rows in k1, p1 rib.
Change to No. 6 needles.

**
Row 1: (right side) Knit twice into every stitch. [128 sts].
Row 2: Sl.1, purl to the last st, k1.
Work 4 rows in stocking stitch (k 1 row, p 1 row).
Row 7: *K2tog; repeat from * to end of row. [64 sts].
Work 5 rows in k1, p1 rib. **
This completes a 12 row pattern.
Repeat from ** to ** twice and then from ** until you have completed the 7th pattern row.

Change to No. 12 needles. Work 6 rows in k1, p1 rib.
Cast off loosely in rib.

Making up - Press each piece lightly on the wrong side under a damp cloth with a hot iron.
Join the cast on and cast off edges together, then continue the seam, stitching up one end for the toe.

Crochet edging - Using the main colour, work a picot edge all around the top of each of the socks, as follows:

One slip st to secure the yarn to the top front edge.
*3ch, 1dc into the first of these chain, miss 1 st, 1 slip st into the next st. Repeat from * around each top.

Embroidery
Using the contrasting wool, work pairs of chain stitches, (or a kind of "lazy daisy" stitch) in a "V" shape down each front seam.
[Editor's note: The link above is to Sharon Boggon's lovely site "In a minute Ago". She is an artist who is interested in the connections between textiles and digital technology, and has created a wonderful site, full of interesting information (and a blog!)]

Materials

Original pattern calls for 2oz of 4ply, and a small quantity of contrast for embroidery.
Example shown is knitted in 2 x 50g balls of Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino, in colour 007.

One pair each of number 12, an No 6 needles.

Tension

20st to 4 inches (10cm) on No 6 (5mm) needles.

Size matters

One size fits all.

A word on the wool.

Baby Cashmerino is heavier than a 4ply, knitting to a tension of 25st and 34 rows to 4 inches. Thus I used more yarn than the original pattern. Each 50g is 125m, and I used 90g.

Boudoir_boots2.jpg

As a variation (or to "use up old scraps of wool") you might choose to make the picot edging in the contrast colour to match the embroidery - I believe this would work better if the contrast were darker than the main colour.
Alternatively, if you are not confident in your embroidery skills (I found it harder than I had imagined) you could stick with a single colour and embroider in the main yarn; this provides a more sophisticated look - if indeed a bedsock can be said in any way to contribute to a sophisticated look!

Feather-light Boudoir Slippers - from only one ounce of wool

Third and final pattern is totally untested, from a magazine dated November 1968 [ "Ideas for Gifts"]. They really are called "boudoir slippers" which, apart from any other consideration, makes me feel that the pattern dates from longer ago than 1968. As a teenager, I would have found these indescribably awful; however, luckily, I did not have relatives who were handy with the old needles.
Likely to remain untested as a girl can have only so many bedsocks.
[Should any readers admit to making this pattern, please submit a photo of the result for me to display here!]

Instructions

Each sock is worked in one piece. Make two alike.

Cast on 76 stitches, and work as follows:

Row 1: k3, * p2, k2; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.
Row 2: k1, * p2, k2; repeat from * to last 3 stitches, p2, k1.

Repeat these rows for 6½ inches.
Cast off loosely in rib.

Change to No. 12 needles. Work 6 rows in k1, p1 rib.
Cast off loosely in rib.

Making up - Fold cast-on edge to cast-off edge and join side seams. (Seams form heel and toe).

Crochet edging - Starting at the heel, crochet eyelets all around the edge as follows: - 3ch, * 1dc in next stitch, 1ch, miss next st; repeat from * all round. Join with slip stitch to 3ch at the beginning.

Then work a row of picots thus: - * 3ch, 1 slip st into the first of these chain, 1 slip st into the 1ch space of the previous round; repeat from * all round. Fasten off

With wool double, crochet a chain cord for each sock and thread through holes; make and sew a small tassel to each end.

Materials

Original pattern calls for 1 (1oz) ball of Patons Beehive Baby Wool in 3ply.

One pair of number 11 needles.
Crochet hook

Tension

32st and 40 rows to 4 inches (10cm).

Size matters

One size fits all.

A word on the wool.

It is fairly easy to acquire 3ply Baby wool to knit up to this tension.

December 2007

Sparkling Stole

SparklingStole.jpg

Adapted from an original idea for sleepwear, this has transformed itself into a glamorous stole.
Whether or not it sparkles obviously depends on the type of wool you choose. I used a fabulous Italian yarn, which was a bit brighter once knitted up, than I had imagined from the ball, but has made a lovely item. The original pattern (from the 1970s but probably revamped from a much earlier design) called for 4 ply wool - about 8 ounces - but my version is not only in much lighter weight man-made fibres with a consequent good yardage, but also designed to be shorter than the original.
I think you could feasibly wear this in the evening with a skimpy evening top or as a decorative addition over a plain black roll-neck sweater.
[Note: we noticed that this colourway works particularly well with dark brown].

Instructions

Using No. 6 (5mm) needles cast on 72 stitches, and work 6 rows k1, p1 rib.

Increase row: K5, * m1 (make one st by picking up the loop between the stitches and knitting into the back of it), k4; repeat from * to the last 6sts, m1, k5. [88 sts].

**
Work 3 rows in stocking stitch, (one row plain, one row purl), starting with a purl row.

Right side of work facing, change to No. 3 (6½mm) needles and commence pattern.

Next pattern row: * K1, k1b; repeat from * to end.
[k1b = knit 1 below: insert needle through the centre of the stitch below the next stitch to be knitted, and knit off both stitches at the same time.]

Work 25 rows in the pattern.
[Editor's note: On an even number of stitches this produces a fisherman rib like stitch, which looks the same on both sides of the work.]

Change to number 6 (5mm) needles and work 3 rows in stocking stitch, starting with a purl row.
**

Increase row: K6, * m1, k4; repeat from * to the last 6sts, m1, k6. [108 sts].

Make a second pattern band by repeating from ** to **.

Increase row: K4, * m1, k4; repeat from * to the last 4sts, m1, k4. [134 sts].

Make a third pattern band by repeating from ** to **, but omit the final three st st rows, and, on this last segment, continue on the No. 3 needles and knit a further 5 pattern rows.

Cast off very loosely using a large gauge needle.

End panels - Using No. 7 (4½mm) needles, and wrong side of work facing, pick up and knit 56 sts purlwise.

Next row: (right side facing) K6, *k2tog, repeat from * to last 6 sts, k6. [34 sts].
Next row: K2, purl to the last 2 sts, k2.
Next row: K15, k2tog tbl, k2tog, K15 [32 sts].
Next row: K2, purl to the last 2 sts, k2.
Next row: K14, k2tog tbl, k2tog, K14 [30 sts].
Next row: K2, purl to the last 2 sts, k2.
Next row: K14, k2tog tbl, k2tog, K14 [28 sts].

Continue to decrease at the centre in this way until 6 sts remain.
Cast off tightly.

Repeat for the other side.

Finishing - Press the stocking-stitch end pieces lighty on the wrong side, using a warm iron and a damp cloth.
Sew in ends, and sew on fastener.
Swan around looking glamorous.

[Editor's notes: The original pattern had 5 segments. If you want to do that, work in the same way, with each pattern band at 25 rows and the following additional increase rows:

Increase row for fourth pattern band: K5, * m1, k5; repeat from * to the last 4sts, m1, k4. [160 sts].
Increase row for fifth pattern band: K3, * m1, k4; repeat from * to the last 2sts, m1, k2. [192 sts].

..and for the side panels pick up and knit 80 sts instead of 56, and decrease to 50 sts in the first decrease row.]

Materials

Example shown is knitted in 2 x 50g balls of an S. Charles Collezione yarn "Ritratto" - shade 64

One pair each of numbers 3, 6 and 7 (UK size) needles.

Fancy clasp available on the web from TextileGarden, or Purlescence, or Nordic Fiber Arts.

Tension

Approx. 16st and 32rows to 4 inches (10cm) measured over pattern using No 3 (6½mm) needles.

Size matters

Width around lower edge: 60 inches
Depth: 15 inches

A word on the wool.

"Ritratto" is a man-made fibre with 28% mohair; knits 22sts to 10cm on No 6 (5mm) needles; 50g ball is 198 yards and I used about 1½ balls for the project.

I think this would work out well using Rowan Kidsilk Haze (or Night or Splash), or in Rowan Damask, which has a slightly shiny silk thread running through the yarn.
Original pattern called for a 4 ply wool weight.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

SparklingStole3.jpg

November 2007

Cosy covers - Sixties retro

Cosy_cover_sixties.jpg

This is my modern version of a hot-water bottle cover. The cover is designed to fit a microwavable hot pad - link for this under "materials". The pads are conveniently small, and much safer (to lie on) than a hot-water bottle.
The pattern stitch from 1968 was used for a tea-cosy (colours Jade, Pink, and White), and a cushion cover (colours Brown, Amber, and White). I think the cushion cover, (style and colour scheme), is more authentically late 60s that the cosy. Although a tea cosy was de rigeur in our house, I think tea bags with and without the use of tea pots was becoming more prevalent by that time.

Instructions

With No. 11 needles and main colour (red), cast on 58 stitches.
Knit 4 rows in garter stitch (every row knit), then one row purl.
Do not break off the main colour (red).

**Change to number 10 needles and commence pattern as follows, using second colour (orange):

Row 1: (right side) *K4, slip 2; repeat from * to last 4 sts, K4.
Row 2: *P4, slip 2; repeat from * to last 4 sts, P4.
Row 3 and 4: As rows 1 and 2.
Break orange wool, and continue in red.
Row 5: knit
Row 6: purl
Row 7: Using the third colour (yellow) K1, *slip 2, K4; repeat from * to last 3sts, slip 2, K1.
Row 8: P1, *slip 2, P4; repeat from * to last 3sts, slip 2, P1.
Row 9 and 10: As rows 7 and 8.
Break yellow wool, and continue in red.
Row 11: knit
Row 12: purl

Rows 13-24: repeat rows 1-12.
Rows 25-30: repeat rows 1-6.

Change to number 11 needles and continue in garter stitch for 15 rows. Purl one row.**

Repeat from ** to ** three times, then rows 1-30 again.

Change to number 11 needles and work in garter stitch for 4 rows. Cast off.

Making up - Press the piece lightly on the wrong side under a damp cloth with a hot iron.
Fold the cover to form a bag as shown in the picture, and sew up the side edges, on the inside, either oversewing or with backstitch.
Sew in all the ends on the wrong side.

Crochet edging - Using the main colour, (red), work a dc edge around the flap of the cover with ties as follows:

With right side facing, starting at the side edge, work 6 dc up edge of the garter st band, 15 dc up the honeycomb edge, 2dc up to corner, 3 dc into the corner st.
Then work across the cast-off edge making 2 dc into every 3 cast off sts approximately. After the first 6 dc (or where you want to place a tie) work the first tie by making 40 chain, then working 1dc into each chain back down to the knitted edge. Continue to work dc into the cast-off sts, making a second tie in the centre of the flap, after approximately 14 dc. Work another 14 dc and make another tie (match the position of the first tie). Work to the edge, 3dc into the corner st and then finish to match the other side of the flap.
Fasten off.

Work 3 more ties by making 40 chain, then working 1 row of dc into each chain. Sew the ties on to the cover to match the positions of the ties on the flap.
[Editor's note: If you want to avoid the crochet altogether you could sew on ribbon ties in the appropriate places.]

Materials

Original pattern calls for three contrast colours, (red, orange and yellow).
Example shown is knitted in 4 ply - 1 x 50g ball of each colour.

One pair each of number 10, an No 11 needles.
Crochet hook.

One hot water bottle "replacement core", (available to order on the web).

Tension

The wool should knit to a basic tension over st st of 28st to 4 inches (10cm) on No 10 (3¼mm) needles.

Size matters

One size.

A word on the wool.

I used Phildar Lambswool (a 4 ply wool/acrylic mix) left over from another project.

Here is a version adapted for a light worsted cotton yarn (Rowan Cotton Glace). For this version, cast on 52 sts.

Cosy_cover_sixties2.jpg

Cosy covers - Fifties retro

Cosy_cover_red.jpg

This is a pattern from 1956 "reversible bottle-cover" (sic) - though why the quotes, why the hyphen, and why the description reversible, I really am not sure. Originally a cover for a hot-water bottle, I have adapted it to fit a microwavable pad. The knitting turned out to be an interesting shape, and in consequence made for an interesting pattern, (probably not as intended). I used a bright red and white combination, which reminded me of a 1950s accessory set. The original recommended colours were "powder blue and white".
In the days when pattern illustrations were not in colour, the colour names were much more vivid and descriptive; modern names tend to try and evoke an emotion rather than a colour. I do love reading these old patterns with the colours - "lipstick red" "primrose yellow" "mimosa" "frosty lime" - you could just eat them - a feast for the mind's eye.

Instructions

First piece - with No. 11 needles and first colour, cast on 4 stitches.

Row 1: Inc in every st (8 sts)
Row 2: K3, inc by knitting into the front and back of the next st - place a st marker - inc, K3 (10 sts)
Row 3: Inc, K3, inc in next 2 sts, K3, inc. (14 sts)
Row 4: K6, inc by knitting into the front and back of the next st - place a st marker - inc, K6 (16 sts)
Row 5: Inc, K6, inc in next 2 sts, K6, inc. (20 sts)
Row 6: K9, inc by knitting into the front and back of the next st - place a st marker - inc, K9 (22 sts)

With the right side facing for row 7 place a row marker on this side of the work, to mark it as the right side of the work.

Then continue working as before, increasing at both ends of the row, and in the middle, on odd (right side) rows; increase only in the middle on even (wrong side) rows.

After a while, the stitches will become crowded and the shape hard to manage on just 2 needles. At this point, spread the sts evenly across two needles, discarding the centre st marker; continue to work back and forth across the needles using a third needle.

The work will take on a triangular, or arrow shape.
[Editor's note: The original pattern is intended to form a triangle, I could not make this happen - the wool I used may have a different rows:sts ratio than the one recommended. This shape and resulting cover is flexible and should suit whatever wool you use.]

Continue working until you have 105 sts on each side of the centre.
Leave the completed piece to one side without casting off. Do not break off the wool.
[Editor's note: The original pattern was intended for a hot water bottle. They advised to knit until there are 139sts with the 3 ply wool. The base of the triangle has to be long enough to wrap around your hot water bottle or heated pad; you can choose to stop knitting when you feel it is wide enough.]

Second piece - work a second triangle (or arrow) in the contrast colour.

Lay the pieces out with the point of one arrow to the base corner of the other arrow, (see picture below).

Continue working with one of the available colours (I used the red). Cast off the two rows of knitting together, using a "three-needle cast off"(see picture below), fairly tightly.

[Editor's note: You put your working needle into the first st on the front needle and the first st on the second needle behind; you pull your loop through and knit both sts off the needles together. You have one st on your working (usually right hand) needle. You repeat so there are two sts on your working needle. You pass the first st you knitted over the second; continue casting off in this way.]

This is how it looks half way through; ideally the work should lie flat at the cast off edge:

Next you put the other two edges together - again the point of one arrow is next to the base corner of the other arrow, (see picture below):

Cast off the two rows together. You are left with a sort of tube; turn it so that the cast off edges are inside. The next picture shows a hot water bottle placed in the tube.

The arrow points are arranged centre front and back.

Fold up one of the ends and sew the diagonal seams in place from the wrong side. (I sewed the tip of my white arrow for the closed end). At the other end, make a chain using the crochet hook and sew in place as a loop for the button at the (red) arrow tip.
Place your "replacement core" in the cover and fold over the top of the cover to an appropriate position and mark the place for the closing button.
Make a crochet flower to act as a button, and sew in place.
[Editor's note: You know ho to make a crochet flower without instructions don't you?
O, all right then; this is what I did...]

Crochet flower - begin by making a slip loop with your first colour as if you were starting a crochet chain, and crochet into this loop for your first round. Ensure that the loop "slips" (can be tightened) from the tail end of your work, not the working end.

Round 1: using the first colour, crochet 8 dc into your loop; adjust the slip loop until the sts fit nicely.
Round 2: chain 3, (1 htr 1ch) into each of the 8 dc then ss join to the first 3ch.
Round 3: 1dc into first chain space, (3ch, 1dc into next ch sp) to end of round, 3ch, ss into first dc. Fasten off.

Make a second flower in the second colour.

Round 1: using the second colour, crochet 8 dc into your loop; adjust the slip loop until the sts fit nicely.
Round 2: ss into first dc, (3ch, ss into next 1dc) to end of round, 3ch, ss into first dc. Fasten off.

Place second flower on top of first, and sew through both layers, onto the cover at the marked position for the button.

Materials

Original pattern calls for 2 oz each of two contrast colours in 3ply.
Example shown is knitted in 4 ply - 1 x 50g ball of each colour.

One pair of number 11 needles, with a spare pair (or set or 4) to aid in the construction.
One No 11 (3mm) crochet hook.

One hot water bottle "replacement core", (available to order on the web).

Tension

Garter stitch is difficult to measure but the wool should knit to a basic tension over st st of 28st to 4 inches (10cm) on No 11 (3mm) needles.

Size matters

One size.

A word on the wool.

I used an acrylic 4ply; not ideal, but these covers can take some wear and tear.

October 2007

Cool-cat cable beret

cable_beret.jpg

Hats are not my thing but I am fond of berets. Here is an irresistible 1970's two-tone design - the original in two glaring shades of gold and yellow. Consider also making it in orange with a strawberry or coffee contrast - I can vouch for this as a popular contemporary combination and you can view it as part of Southwest airlines hostess uniforms from the same period (although the colour of the uniforms is possibly not as striking as the hot pants and knee boots of the period...).
Alternatively just stick with more reserved single colour in traditional white Aran, understated and letting the pattern speak for itself.

Cable Pattern

Row 1: P3, k6, p3.
Row 2: K3, p6, k3.
Rows 3-8: Repeat first and second rows 3 times.
Row 9: P3, c3f, p3. [c3f = cable 3 front by working across 6 sts as follows: slip next 3 sts on to a cable needle and leave at front of work, knit next 3 sts, then knit 3sts from the cable needle].
Row 10: K3, p6, k3.

These 10 rows form the pattern.

Special note: Wind 5 small balls of yarn in each colour. Use a separate ball for each cable and panel, and twist the colours where they meet to avoid gaps in work ("intarsia method").

Instructions

Using No. 10 needles and medium colour (M), cast on 106 stitches, and work 9 rows k1, p1 rib.

[Editor's note: If you work the beret in 2 colours then work over 2 needles as described. If you work in a single colour, you could work this in the round, reversing knit and purl sts on wrong side rows.]

Next row: (p1, p into front and back of next st) twice, * p2, p into front and back of next st, p1, p into front and back of next st; repeat from * to the last 7sts, (p1, p into front and back of next st) 3 times; p into front and back of last st. [150 sts].

Change to No 7 needles.

Next row: (right side) * k22 in M; join in light (L), k2, (k into front and back of next st) 4 time, k2; repeat from * to end. [170 sts].
Next row: (wrong side) * k3, p6, k3, (2nd row of cable pattern) in L; p22 in M; repeat from * to end.

Continue in stocking stitch and cable pattern, until work measures 5½ inches from beginning, finishing with right side facing for the next row.

Shape crown as follows:

Next row: * (k2tog, k7, k2tog tbl) twice in M; pattern 12 L; repeat from * to end. [150 sts].
Next row: * pattern 12 in L; P18 in M; repeat from * to end.
Next row: * (k2tog, k5, k2tog tbl) twice in M; pattern 12 L; repeat from * to end. [130 sts].
Next row: * pattern 12 in L; P14 in M; repeat from * to end.
Next row: * (k2tog, k3, k2tog tbl) twice in M; pattern 12 L; repeat from * to end. [110 sts].
Work 1 row.
Next row: * (k2tog, k1, k2tog tbl) twice in M; pattern 12 L; repeat from * to end. [90 sts].
Work 1 row.
Next row: * k3tog, k3tog tbl twice in M; pattern 12 L; repeat from * to end. [70 sts].
Break off M.

Next row: K3, * p6, k2, (p2tog) twice, k2; repeat from * to last 11sts; p6, k2, p3tog. [60 sts].
Next row: * p2tog, p1, pattern 6, p1, p2tog; repeat from * to end. [50 sts].
Next row: * p2tog, p6, p2tog; repeat from * to end. [40 sts].
Next row: * k2tog, k4, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [30 sts].
Next row: Purl.
Next row: * k2tog; repeat from * to end. [15 sts].

Break off wool leaving end. Thread end through remaining sts and draw up tightly. Fasten off securely.

Making up - Press lighty on the wrong side, using a warm iron and a damp cloth. Join seam, using a fine back stitch. Press seam.

Materials

Original pattern calls for 3oz of medium colour and 1oz light in an Aran weight yarn.
Example shown is knitted in 3 x 50g balls of a heavy vintage DK from Phildar.

One pair each of numbers 10 and 7 needles.

Tension

20st and 25 rows to 4 inches (10cm) on No 7 (4½mm) needles.

Size matters

Instructions to fit an "average" head (!).

A word on the wool.

I used Phildar yarns Oxygene (a DK) which knits 23st to 4 inches; and Frénésie (a heavy DK) which knits 19st to 4 inches.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

1970s and colour

Yet another object of my admiration is Southwest airlines. They don't really have any visibility outside the US, so I was suitably surprised on my first journey with them. (It was the night of October 31st flying to Tucson in 1994, and they sure had some fun with us passengers...). I have also been impressed at their impromptu organisation of party games to try and occupy a hot and fractious plane load of souls during an hours delay at LA. (See the wikipedia entry: "Southwest is known for colourful boarding announcements and crews that burst out in song. The singing is unusual, and is quite popular among customers, but has been noted by some travel critics as being offensive and intrusive." huh - what do they know?!)
They had their 25th anniversary in 1996, and had an exhibition that I must have caught somewhere (perhaps a magazine article) which showed their uniform designs over the years. Sadly I can't find any trace of this on the web now - just these photos:

sw-airlines-1970s.jpg orange200.jpg

September 2007

Friendly Tortoise

tortoise.jpg

I do enjoy unusual knitted toys - and I had a succession of pet tortoises as a child (when it was legal...) - so this seems a natural choice. I am very pleased with the way he worked out, and he was not as fiddly to make as I had expected; probably about 2 evenings work in all.

Instructions

The tortoise is knitted in garter stitch (every row knit) throughout.

Shell

Cast on 11 stitches, and knit 1 row.
Then increase 1 st (work into the front and back of the stitch) at each end of the next and every alternate row until there are 23 sts.

[Editor's note: To increase, I work into the front and back of the first st, knit to the last two sts, then work into the front and back of the next st, then knit the last st. This avoids a stepped effect at the end of the row. If you increase in a different way - for example, picking up the loop between sts - then you may not have this problem. Make sure you know how the pattern instuctions intend you to work an increase by looking at the abbreviations. There is usually an implied difference between "increase in the next st" and "make 1".]

Knit 32 rows straight, then decrease 1 st at each end of the next and every alternate row until there are 11 sts remaining.
Cast off.

Make another piece the same.

[Editor's note: I embroidered the top half of the shell before sewing up. The tension of the embroidery encouraged the shell-shape of the piece.]

Join the two halves together leaving an opening for stuffing. Stuff firmly and sew up opening.

Embroidery on top half: outer circles in light brown chain-stitch with smaller dark brown circles inside.
See photograph.

[Editor's note: I am not very good at free-form embroidery, so was a bit worried about this - but it worked out OK. You can see that what I did was very lop-sided, but despite that it looks fine I think...]

Head

Start at neck edge and cast on 10 sts.
Knit 3 rows.
Next row: K2tog., knit to end.

Next row: Knit to the last 2 sts; inc in next st, k1.
Next row: Knit.
Repeat the last 2 rows 3 times more.

Next row: Inc in the first st; knit to the last 2 sts; inc in next st, k1. [15 sts].

Knit 5 rows.

Next row: K2tog; knit to the last 2 sts; k2tog.
Next row: Knit.
Repeat the last 2 rows twice more. [9 sts].

Next row: K2tog.; knit to the last 2 sts; k2tog.
Cast off 7 sts.

Make another piece the same. Sew halves together leaving neck end open for stuffing.
Stuff firmly to shape with seam at centre of head and face. Sew open end of neck to one end of shell.

Features: Eyes - black and white straight stitches; mouth - long black straight stitch.

Front feet

Cast on 4 sts.
Knit 3 rows.
Next row: Inc in the first st; knit to the last 2 sts; inc in next st, k1.
Repeat the last 4 rows once more. [8 sts].
Knit 3 rows.

Shape thus: Next row: k2, turn, k back;
Next row: k3, turn, k back; Next row: k4, turn, k back;
Next row: k5, turn, k back; Next row: k6, turn, k back.
Knit 2 rows over all sts.

Next row: Inc in the first st; knit to the last 2 sts; inc in next st, k1.
Knit 4 rows.
Next row: Inc in the first st; knit to the last 2 sts; inc in next st, k1. [12 sts]
Knit 3 rows.

Now dec. 1st at each end of the next 3 rows.
Cast off remaining 6 sts.

Make 3 more pieces the same. Sew each pair together, leaving cast off edges open for stuffing.
Stuff firmly, and sew open end to underside of shell on either side of the neck.
[Editor's note: Since the feet are shaped, make sure you sew the feet on pointing in the same direction (see photo for guidance). Needless to say, I made this error and had to correct it.

Back feet

Cast on 16 sts, and knit 7 rows.

Next row: Inc in the first st; (k4; inc in the next st.) 3 times. [20 sts].
Knit 2 rows; cast off.

Sew the short sides together to form a cylinder shape.

Make another piece the same.

Pads: Cast on 3 sts.
Next row: Knit.
Next row: Inc in the next 2 sts, k1.
Next row: Knit.
Next row: Inc in the next st, k2, inc in the next st, k1. [7 sts].
Knit 3 rows.

Dec 1 st at each end of the next and following alternate row.
Cast off 3 sts.

Make another pad piece in the same way. Sew pads to cast off ends of back feet. Stuff firmly; sew open ends to back on underside of shell about 1 inch apart.
[Editor's note: I misread this - or was not careful enough - and sewed the pads to the smaller cast-on edge - so take note here. I did not correct this error and it looks OK - but toys are more flexible like that....]

Mark claws with 4 black straight stitches on each foot.

Tail

Cast on 17 sts.
Knit 2 rows.
Next row: K2;k2tog, k2tog; k5; k2tog, k2tog; k2. [13 sts]
Knit 3 rows.
Next row: K1;k2tog, k2tog; k3; k2tog, k2tog; k1. [11 sts]
Knit 3 rows.
Next row: K2tog, k2tog; k1; k2tog, k2tog.[5 sts]
Knit 2 rows.
Next row: K2tog, k2tog; k1.
Draw thread through 3 sts and pull up.

Sew together along edges to make a cone shape; flatten slightly into a traingle, along line of increases; stuff lightly and sew the wider, open end to the shell at the back, (in line with the head), and so that the seam is underneath.

Edging around shell

Cast on 7 sts.

* Knit 2 rows.
Next row: K5, turn, knit back.
Next row: K5, turn, knit back.
Next row: K2 tog, k5.
Next row: Knit to the last st, inc in last st.
Repeat from * 28 times more.
Cast off.

[Editor's note: Again I altered the pattern here omitting one of the 5 st short rows, making the shell edge less frilly - this is what I did:
* Knit 2 rows.
Next row: K5, turn, knit back.
Next row: K2 tog, k5.
Next row: Knit to the last st, inc in last st.
Repeat from * about 32 times more, or to fit round shell..]

Sew straight edge around the seam of the shell, finishing on either side of the head. Work a line of light brown chain stitch over the join, then a second line in dark brown 2 sts away.

Using an oddment of bright coloured wool, cut into 3 strands and tie round neck. [Editor's note: ...or use a ribbon...]

Materials

Original pattern calls for 2oz of DK in French Mustard.
Small quantities of light and dark brown wools for markings on the back; scraps of black and white.

One pair of number 11 needles.

Toy stuffing.

Tension

Not given - but DK wool usually knits to approximately 22st to 4 inches (10cm) on No. 8 (4mm) needles over st. st.

Size matters

Tortoise measures 8 inches in length and 6 inches across width of shell.

A word on the wool.

I had some difficulty in finding what I thought a satisfactory colour. Eventually I bought some 4ply from eBay and used it knitted double. I use 4ply oddments for the embroidery.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

April 2007

Pebbles bag

Pebbles_bag.jpg

I intended to knit this bag from a pattern where the designer confessed she had been forced to change her mind half way through knitting a hat, and call it a bag. I did not go ahead with my plan, and my pattern is now far removed from that original idea, (except for the handles!). The colours in this wool remind me of the stoney flint beaches on the south coast of England, where I was born and brought up.

Instructions

With No. 3 needles, cast on 51 stitches, and work 5 rows stocking stitch starting with a knit row.
Next row: wrong side facing, Knit to end.

With right side facing, commence pattern as follows:

Row 1: P4, K3, (P5, K3) 5 times, P4
Row 2: K4, P3, (K5, P3) 5 times, K4
Row 3: P4, K3, (P5, K3) 5 times, P4
Row 4: (P3, K5) 6 times, P3
Row 5: (P3, K5) 6 times, P3
Row 6: (P3, K5) 6 times, P3

[Editor's note: I chose a textured stitch to best suit the random and nubbly texture of Chunky Print. The muted stone colourway works well, I think, with this basket-weave stitch. If you have a more 'romantic' colourway you may prefer a different pattern. See "blackberry stitch" section below for an alternative four-row pattern to substitute here if you like].

Repeat the six-row pattern 20 times or to desired length, and then the first 3 rows again.
[Editor's note: I tried to knit this very precisely to use up all the 3 balls of wool; you may wish to knit a few rows fewer in order to be sure you will have sufficient with your chosen wool. You can knit the sides before finishing off the body to try and gauge if you are running short].

Next row: wrong side facing, Knit to end.
With right side facing, work 4 rows stocking stitch starting with a knit row. Cast off.

Side panels (make 2 the same):
[Editor's note: you may wish to omit the sides altogether, either for simplicity, or to save on wool. See notes on "adapting the pattern" below.]

Cast on 10sts and work as follows in reverse stocking stitch throughout.

Row 1: P10
Row 2: Inc in the first st, (by knitting into the front and back of the st), K9, inc in next st, K1. [12 sts]
Row 3: P12.
Row 4: K12

Continue in reverse st st for 28 more rows.
Decrease one st at each end of the next row, [10 sts].
Work a further 11 rows.
Decrease one st at each end of the next row, [8 sts].
Work a further 5 rows.
Decrease one st at each end of the next row, [6 sts].
Work two more rows, and then cast off knitwise, decreasing one st at each end of the cast-off row.

Making up - Cut and construct the lining before sewing the bag sections together.
Attach the handles to each end of the main body section, as follows:
Sew a hem at each end of the bag, folding down the st st rows and using the purl row as your hem edge.
Starting about 2 inches from the edge of the bag, oversew the hem ends (using huge binding sts) to the circular bamboo handles. Ease the straight edge of the bag around the handle as you sew. Stop sewing about two inches from the other side of the bag.
[Editor's note: If you are knitting "to the wire", as I did, to use up all the wool, you need to remember to reserve some yarn to attach the handles; I used about 14 yards of the yarn for this binding.]

Construct the lining - do this before attaching the sides to the bag.
[Editor's note: I advise you to read the whole of this section before you start cutting anything].

Cut the fabric to the width of the bag, using the body section as a guide, and remembering to leave enough for the seams at the edges. Do not cut the fabric to length at this point, unless you are making a simple pocket style bag (see "adapting the pattern").

Press the side panels lightly using a damp cloth. Using the side panels as pattern pieces, cut two fabric side pieces from the fabric you have left over, not forgetting to leave a seam allowance. Fold over the top edge on each piece.

[Editor's note: A lining does not have to be too exact, (the knitting outside is stretchy); it should support the contents of the bag and protect the bag from distorting - I try and make it err just slightly larger than the knitted bag "at rest".]

Form the internal pocket section in the lining as follows:
Turn down the ends of the fabric that you will attaching to the mouth of the bag (where the handles are).
Lay the fabric over the knitting, placing the turned down edges roughly in position at the handle ends. Make the fabric fit the length of the main section of the bag by making a pleat as shown in the picture; this pleat forms the pocket. Pin the pleat into position at both sides, and mark the position for, and then make (by hand or machine), a button hole to fit your exotic button, through the top two layers of the pleat. Sew the button in place on the bottom layer of the pleat to meet the button hole.

Pin and sew the side panel lining pieces to the main body of the lining.

Inserting the side panels - and completing the bag.
Pin the knitted side panel sections into position, and crochet the two edges together with a single row of double crochet, to form an external "seam", as shown in the picture.

Sew the lining into the bag, slipstitching around the handles and bag mouth. Do not pull your stitches too tight.

Adapting the pattern

You may wish to adapt the bag by omitting the sides altogether, either for simplicity, or to save on wool.
To do this you simply fold the main body in half and join the sides to make a simple pocket; you can crochet up the sides (as above) or just sew them. Likewise the lining is formed by folding the fabric in half to fit the bag, sewing up the sides, and attaching to the mouth of the bag as above.
Note: If you choose to adapt the bag, it will not have a "base", so it will look proportionately longer than the knitted example with sides. So if you plan to do this you may want to knit the main body 2 inches shorter than instructed above. You can test how the bag looks by folding it in half every so often, as you are knitting.

Blackberry stitch

An alternative four-row pattern to use in place of the six-row basket weave pattern. [Editor's note: Because of its "one-from-three, three-from-one" nature, this stitch is also know in the Irish tradition as Trinity stitch.]

The four-row pattern is worked over 50 sts using number 2 needles:
Row 1 (right side facing): Purl.
Row 2: K1, (P3tog, inc 2 by K1,P1,K1 into next st) 12 times, K1
Row 3: Purl.
Row 4: K1, (inc 2 by K1,P1,K1 into next st, P3tog) 12 times, K1

To complete the main section of the bag, repeat the four-row pattern 26 times or to desired length, and then the first 3 rows again.
Next row: wrong side facing, Knit to end.
With right side facing, work 4 rows stocking stitch starting with a knit row. Cast off.
[Editor's note: If you use this pattern your bag will work out a slightly different proportion and shape than the basket-weave one due to the stitch making a different tension. You could compensate by working over 54 sts instead of 50 and knitting some rows fewer in length; whatever you choose, remember to keep an eye on your yarn quantity as you knit. Bags are very adaptable.

Materials

3 x 100g balls (each 100m/109yards) Rowan Chunky Print, colour 078, Pebble Dash, or 081 Shriek.

One pair of number 3 needles.
One crochet hook, number 5 (5½mm).

Two bamboo-style round handles.

Half a metre (or half a yard) of cotton fabric for lining.

1 exotic button oddment (about ¾-1 inch in size.)
[Ed: We all have them]

Tension

14sts x 18rows to 4 inches (10cm) on No 3 (6½mm) needles over basket-weave pattern.
16sts x 16rows to 4 inches (10cm) on No 2 (7mm) needles over blackberry pattern.

Crochet

Remember these instructions use UK terms. Double crochet is equivalent to US "single crochet".

Size matters

Bag is approximately 14in by 12in and 2in deep at the sides.
The dimensions of the bag were determined by eye in proportion with the chosen handles, and knitted in order to use the complete 3 balls of the chosen wool.

A word on the wool.

Chunky Print has been discontinued by Rowan (sadly, as it seemed to have a pleasing colour range, and knit up quickly and economically).
Chunky Print has a yardage of 100 metres (109 yards) per 100g ball, and knits to a tension of 11sts x 14 rows to 4 inches on No 0 needles (9mm).
A good substitute might be Debbie Bliss Soho (6 x 50g balls).
Rowan Biggy Print comes in similar colours but is a vastly different tension; it would be quite feasible to convert this pattern to a different tension yourself.

Quilting fabrics are ideal for the lining; they are inexpensive and come in a fabulous range of colours.
You can afford to be adventurous with linings; choose a lovely rich colour, probably one that you would not care for in an item of clothing!
The lining is important - don't skimp on it.

Here is my completed Pebbles bag, in the Shriek colourway with blackberry stitch. As a decoration I used a brooch that Alison gave me years ago - the idea being that it was a heart for me to "wear on my sleeve". The lining is an old Kaffe Fassett quilt fabric which turned out to be an improbably good match.

Here is the original Pebbles bag in the Pebble Beach colourway with basket weave stitch. The brooch decoration, like the heart above, tones so well with the wool that it provides a very subtle effect on the bag.


December 2006

Father George’s slippersocks

Men's slippersocks in 2 colours. I have also knitted a 3 colour version to use up wool oddments. I did try to knit these completely in the round to avoid seams but found it almost impossibly complex to do the fair-isle over only half the round - so I would stick to the instructions as given

Instructions

With No. 12 needles and main shade (M) cast on 60 stitches loosely, and arrange over 3 needles.
Work in k3, p3 rib for 8 rows.
Change to number 10 needles.

Commence pattern as follows:

Rnd 1: Change to contrast colour (C) and knit all sts.
Rnds 2-8: Work in k3, p3 rib, as set.
Rnd 9: Change to colour M and knit all sts.
Rnds 10-12: Work in k3, p3 rib, as set.
Rnd 13: Joining in colour C, *k1 M, k1 C; repeat from * to end.
Rnd 14: *k1 C, k1 M; repeat from * to end.
Rnd 15-16: Repeat last 2 rows once more.
Rnd 17: Continue with M only, *k3, p1, k1, p1; repeat from * to end. [Editor's note: this strange row is a k3 p3 rib avoiding purl sts while changing colour].
Rnds 18-20: Work in k3, p3 rib, as previously set.

These 20 Rows form the pattern.

Work top of foot as follows:

Break off M and slip the first 16 sts of the round on to a spare dpn, and slip the last 13 sts on to a second spare dpn. [Editor's note: these can be your No. 12 needles if required].
Continue knitting on the centre 31 sts over 2 No. 10 needles in shade C; commence the pattern rows as before, adjusting the pattern as follows:

Row 1: Using C knit all sts.
Row 2: p2, * k3, p3; repeat from * to last 5 sts: k3, p2.
Row 3: k2, * p3, k3; repeat from * to last 5 sts: p3, k2.
Row 4: as row 2.
Continue with the rib, working a single knit row every time you change colour. Set the fair-isle pattern as follows:
Row 13: Join in C, *k1 M, k1 C; repeat from * to last st, k1 M.
Row 14: *p1 C, p1 M; repeat from * to last st, p1 C.
Rows 15-16: Repeat last 2 rows once more.
Row 17: Using M only: k1, p1, *k3, p1, k1, p1; repeat from * to last 5 sts: k3, p1, k1.
Row 18: k2, * p3, k3; repeat from * to last 5 sts: p3, k2.
Work 2 more rib rows in M to complete the 20 row pattern.

Now work one more pattern set of 20 rows, and then the first 8 rows again, decreasing 1st at the end of the last row, (30 sts).
[Editor's note: make any measurement adjustments here].

Shape toe:

Using M only, continue in stocking stitch, (one row knit, one row purl), decreasing 1 st (k2 tog) at each end of the next, and every alternate row, until 14 sts remain. Leave these sts on a safety pin.

Make the heel:

Return to the remaining 29sts; place both sets together on one needle, and continue to work on them in st st, using colour M.
Next row: k2tog tbl, k12, inc in next st, k12, k2tog. (28 sts)
[Editor's note: this instruction increases a stitch by knitting into the front and back of a st. This produces a tiny bar, visible across the newly created st. If you want an invisible increase then you "make 1" by picking up the strand between two sts and knitting into the back of it - this twists the strand and keeps the new st tight. This type of increase is often used for berets or tams as it is completely invisible; you cannot hide a decrease in the same way. If you use this method here then the row above will read:
Next row: k2tog tbl, k12, make 1 st, k13, k2tog. (28 sts)].

Next row: purl.
Continue decreasing one st at each end of every alternate row, until 14 sts remain.
Now begin to increase one st at each end of every alternate row, until there are 30 sts.

Continue in st st until the foot is the same length as the top.
[Editor's note: remember any measurement adjustments you made before].
Shape toe as given for the top.

Making up.

Graft the two sets of 14 sts together.
[Editor's note: if you have a suitable computer, here is a super video demo of grafting, otherwise use the link above for a picture demo]
Press the work lightly with a hot iron using a damp cloth.
Sew up the heel seams and the seams on the sides of the foot.

Make a second sock to match.

Materials

2 x 50g skeins of main shade and 1 x 50g contrast in double knitting wool.

Two sets of 4 double pointed needles, Nos. 10 and 12.

Tension

24 sts to 4 inches measured over stocking stitch on No 10 (3¼mm) needles.

Size matters

The pattern as written should fit a foot of 11 inches in length.

© Christina Coutts 2007

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