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February 2017

French Connection

FrenchConnectionSweater.jpg

An expression of the era of safari suits and cravats* heralding a new "casual look" - where you could be smart without a lounge suit - like Brett Sinclair. [Having said that I can only find pictures of Brett with his safari jacket open necked or worn over a polo-neck, and his cravats worn conventionally with his suits; perhaps this was an expression of the character he was playing rather than fashion.]

If you overlook the styling - and maybe the colour - this is quite a nice sweater - and maybe cap if not all worn as an outfit. A shorter button-through neck would improve it for me.

* See gratuitous picture of Roger at the end of the instructions.

Sweater Instructions.

Back

**
With No. 7 needles, cast on 72/76/80/84 stitches

1st row: p1, k2, * p2, k2; repeat from * to last stitch, p1.
2nd row: k1, p2, * k2, p2; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.
Repeat the last 2 rows twice more.

Change to No 4 needles and pattern as follows:

1st row (right side facing): * Tw2R, k1 ; repeat from * to end.
2nd row: * k1, p2, k1; repeat from * to end.
3rd row: * p1, Tw2L, p1 ; repeat from * to end.
4th row: purl.
5th row: k.3, * Tw2R, k2; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.
6th row: p1, k2, * p2, k2; repeat from * to last stitch, p1.
7th row: k1, p2, * Tw2L, p2; repeat from * to last stitch, .
8th row: purl.
These 8 rows form pattern. Repeat them twice more.

Shape sides by increasing 1 stitch at each end of the next and every following 24th row until there are 78/82/86/90 stitches, taking increased stitches into pattern.

Work straight until back measures 17 inches, ending with right side facing.

Keeping continuity of pattern, shape armholes by casting off 4 stitches at the beginning of the next 2 rows, then decrease 1 stitch at each end of every row until 58/60/62/64 stitches remain.
**

Work straight until back measures 26/26½/27/27½ inches, ending with right side facing.

Shape shoulders by casting off 5/6/6/6 stitches at the beginning of the next 4 rows, then 6/5/5/6 stitches at the beginning of the following 2 rows. Leave the remaining 26/26/28/28 stitches on a spare needle.

Front

Work as for back from ** to **.
Work 2/1/2/1 rows straight.

Divide for front opening as follows:

Next row: pattern 26/27/28/29. Turn.
Leave remaining stitches on a spare needle.

Work straight in pattern on these 26/27/28/29 stitches for first side until front measures 23/23/23½/23½ inches, ending with right side facing.

Shape neck by decreasing 1 stitch at the neck edge on the next 7 rows, then on every alternate row until 16/17/17/18 stitches remain.

Work a few rows straight until front matches back at armhole edge, ending with right side facing.
Shape shoulder by casting off 5/6/6/6 stitches at the beginning of the next and following alternate row.
Work 1 row straight.
Cast off remaining 6/5/5/6 stitches.

With right side facing, leave centre 6 stitches on a safety-pin; rejoin yarn to remaining stitches and pattern to end.

Finish to correspond with first side, reversing shapings.

Sleeves

With No 7 needles, cast on 32/32/36/36 stitches and work 3 inches in rib as on lower edge of back increasing 4 stitches evenly across last row: 36/36/40/40 stitches.

Change to No 4 needles and pattern as on back, shaping sides by increasing 1 stitch at each end of the 9th and every following 6th row until there are 48/44/52/50 stitches.
Now increase 1 stitch at each end of every following 4th row until there are 62/64/66/70 stitches, taking increased stitches into pattern.

Work straight until sleeve seam measures 18/18/18½/18½ inches, ending with right side facing.

Keeping continuity of pattern, shape top by casting off 4 stitches at the beginning of the next 2 rows, then decrease 1 stitch at each end of the next and every alternate row until 38/38/42/42 38/38/42/42 stitches remain.

Now decrease 1 stitch at each end of every row until 16 stitches remain.
Cast Off.

Left Front Border

With right side facing and No 7 needles, work across 6 centre stitches on front as follows:

1st row: k2, p1, m1, p1, k2 {7 sts}
2nd row: k1, (p1, k1) 3 times.
3rd row: k2, p1, k1, p1, k2.

Repeat the last 2 rows until border, when slightly stretched, fits up left side of front to start of neck shaping, ending with right side facing.
Leave stitches on .a safety-pin.
Using a flat seam, sew border in position.

Right Front Border

With No 7 needles, cast on 7 stitches and work in rib as for left front until border fits up right side of front to start of neck shaping, ending with right side facing.

Do not break yarn. Leave stitches on a safety pin.
Sew border in position.

To Make Up

Omitting ribbing, press lightly under a damp cloth or following the instructions on the ball band.
Join shoulder seams.

Collar

With right side facing and No 7 needles, rib 7 stitches from right front border, pick up and knit 16/18/20/22 up right side of neck, knit 26/26/28/28 from back, increase 1 stitch at centre, pick and knit 16/18/20/22 down left side, then rib 7 border stitches.
{73/77/83/87 sts}

Shape collar as follows:

1st row: k1, * p1, k1, repeat from * to end.
2nd row: k1, * k1, p1, repeat from * to last 2 stitches , k2.
3rd row: k1, p1, k1, m1, rib to last 3 stitches, m1, k1, p1, k1.
4th row: k2, p2, rib to last 4 stitches, p2, k2.
5th row: as 3rd.
6th row: rib 34/36/39/41, (m1, rib1, m1, rib3) twice, m1, rib1, m1, rib to end.
7th - 9th rows: as 3rd - 5th rows.

Now repeat rows 2 - 5 until collar measures 4 inches at centre back, ending with 2nd or 4th row.
Cast off evenly in rib.

Use a tapestry needle and 12 inch lengths of yarn for making up, noting that yarn must be twisted from time to time during make up so that it does not break.

Join side and sleeve seams; insert sleeves.
Catch down border stitches at base of opening on wrong side.
Press seams.

Materials

17/18/19/20 x 50g balls chunky wool.

Pair each of No 4 (6mm) No 7 (4½mm) needles.

Tension

15st and 20 rows to four inches on No 4 needles over stocking stitch.
16st and 20 rows over pattern.

Size matters

To fit chest: 17/18/19/20 inches;
length from * top of shoulders: 26/26½/27/27½ ins;
sleeve seam:
18/18/18½/18½ ins

Abbreviations

Tw2R: k2tog, but do not slip stitches off needle; then knit first stitch again,
slipping both stitches off needle together
Editors note: although the "twist 2 left" method (below) is familiar to me, I would not normally do a "twist 2 right" in this fashion. I would normally knit the second stitch on the needle without slipping it off the needle, then knit the first stitch and slip both off together. However, I am not sure if this instruction is intentional to achieve a slightly different pattern.
Tw2L: miss first stitch and knit into back of second stitch, then knit first stitch, slipping both stitches off needle together.
m1: make 1 stitch by picking up horizontal
loop lying before next stitch and working into the back of it.

A word on the wool.

Original yarn was Patons Husky Chunky, which as I recall was a pure wool chunky, and a fairly dense tough yarn as the name implies.
[Colour "Lichen" - and from my experience of lichen, a fairly good representation!]

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

Cap Instructions

Crown

With No, 4 needles, cast on 14 stitches and purl 1 row.

Shape as follows:
1st row (right side facing): increase in first stitch, k1, * Tw2R, k2; repeat from * to last 4 stitches, Tw2R, increase in next stitch, k1.
2nd row: increase in first stitch, * k2, p2; repeat from * to last 3 stitches, k1, increase in next stitch, p1.
3rd row: increase in first stitch, k1, * p2, Tw2L; repeat from * to last 4 stitches, p2, increase in next stitch, p1.
4th row: increase in first stitch, purl to last 2 stitches, increase in next stitch, p1.
5th row: increase in first stitch, k3, * Tw2R, k2; repeat from * to last
2 stitches, increase in next stitch, k1.
6th row: increase in first stitch, * p2, k2; repeat from * to last 3 stitches, p1, increase in next stitch, k1.
7th row: increase in first stitch, p1, * Tw2L, p2; repeat from * to last 4 stitches,Tw2L, increase in next stitch, k1.
8th row:purl.

Keeping continuity of pattern, increase 1 stitch as before at each end of next and following 2 alternate rows: {34 sts}
Work 3 rows straight, then increase 1 stitch as before at each end of following row: {36 sts}
Work 9 rows straight. Now decrease 1 stitch at each end of next and following 4th row: {32 sts}
Work 1 row straight, then decrease 1 stitch at each end of next and following 2 alternate rows: {26 sts}

Now decrease 1 stitch at each end of every row until 14 stitches remain. Work 1 row straight.
Cast off

Brim

With No 7 needles, cast on 84 stitches.

1st row: (p2, increase in next stitch) 3 times, * p1, increase in next stitch, p2, increase in next stitch; repeat from * to last 5 stitches, p2, increase in next stitch p2. {116 sts}

Change to No 4 needles and work rows 1 - 8 of pattern as on back of sweater, then repeat rows 1 - 3 again. Cast off knitwise.

Peak

With right side facing and No 7 needles, pick up and knit 76 stitches along cast-on edge on the brim.
Knit 3 rows.

Shape as follows:
1st row: knit to last 19 stitches. Turn.
2nd row
: k2, increase in next stitch, (k1, increase in next stitch) 16 times, k3. Turn.
3rd and 4th rows: knit to last 21 stitches. Turn.
5th and 6th rows: knit to last 23 stitches. Turn.

Continue working short rows in this manner, working 2 stitches fewer on every 2 rows until the rows "knit to last 33 stitches. Turn" have been worked.

Next 2 rows: knit to last 36 stitches. Turn.
Next 2 rows
: knit to last 40 stitches. Turn.
Next 2 rows: knit to end, picking up a loop at each point where work was turned and knitting it together with next stitch to avoid a
hole. Knit 1 row.
Cast off knitwise.

Making Up

Block crown to a 9 inch circle by pinning out round edges, and press lightly under a damp cloth.
Block and press brim and peak.

Using a flat seam, join ends of brim.
Placing join to centre of cast-off edge of crown, oversew cast-off edge of brim neatly to edge of crown.

Materials

3x 50g balls chunky wool.

Pair each of No 4 (6mm) No 7 (4½mm) needles.

Tension

24st and 32 rows to four inches on No 9 needles.

Size matters

"Average hat size".

A word on the wool.

Original yarn was Patons Husky Chunky, which as I recall was a pure wool chunky, and a fairly dense tough yarn as the name implies.
[Colour "Lichen" - and from my experience of lichen, a fairly good representation!]

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

SaintSafariJacket.jpg

February 2015

Nice and Easy ... hat and scarf

NiceNEasyHat2.jpg

This is the month for the Sailor's Society** "woolly hat week" (8th-14th February 2015). So I thought I would post this hat and scarf combination - easy to knit in 4 ply fingering weight knitting yarn - perhaps suitable for a sailor if you omit the pom-pom decoration!

You can find other patterns as well as where to send your hats on their website link above. Also see my previous POM from 2008 with other chunky hat patterns - including my all time favourite appropriately knitted in Fisherman's rib.

Here's what Hannah says: "Our international network of port chaplains and ship visitors give your amazing hats out to seafarers visiting port, while others are wrapped and included in the Christmas welfare parcels that are taken on board ship for the festive season. The need for more hats is ever-increasing! Drew, our Port Chaplain in Invergordon, has been known to give out 500 in a day on occasion!"

Instructions

Panels of moss stitch and flag stitch are used for this cosy scarf and pull on hat. The scarf is fringed and the hat trimmed with a large pom-pom.

Scarf

Cast on 72 sts
1st row (right side): * (k1, p1) 4 times, k1, p7; repeat from * to last 8 sts; (k1, p1) 4 times.
2nd row: * (p1, k1) 4 times, k6, p2; repeat from * to last 8 sts; (p1, k1) 4 times.
3rd row: * (k1, p1) 4 times, k3, p5; repeat from * to last 8 sts; (k1, p1) 4 times.
4th row: * (p1, k1) 4 times, k4, p4; repeat from * to last 8 sts; (p1, k1) 4 times.
5th row: * (k1, p1) 4 times, k5, p3; repeat from * to last 8 sts; (k1, p1) 4 times.
6th row: * (p1, k1) 4 times, k2, p6; repeat from * to last 8 sts; (p1, k1) 4 times.
7th row: * (k1, p1) 4 times, k7, p1; repeat from * to last 8 sts; (k1, p1) 4 times.
8th row: * (p1, k1) 4 times, p8; repeat from * to last 8 sts; (p1, k1) 4 times.

These 8 rows form the pattern.

Continue in pattern until scarf measures 167½ cm (66 inches) from beginning, (or however long you want the scarf to be) ending with an 8th pattern row.

Cast off.

To make up the Scarf

Do not press.
Cut yarn into 30½ cm (12 inch) lengths. Taking 3 strands together, knot fringe into every alternate stitch along cast on and cast off edges.

Hat

Cast on 144 stitches.

Work in pattern as given for scarf, but without the moss stitch border on both sides. So set out your rows as follows:

1st row (right side): * (k1, p1) 4 times, k1, p7; repeat from * end.
2nd row: * k6, p2; (p1, k1) 4 times; repeat from * to end.
3rd row: * (k1, p1) 4 times, k3, p5; repeat from * to end.
4th row: * k4, p4; (p1, k1) 4 times; repeat from * to end.
5th row: * (k1, p1) 4 times, k5, p3; repeat from * to end.
6th row: * k2, p6; (p1, k1) 4 times; repeat from * to end.
7th row: * (k1, p1) 4 times, k7, p1; repeat from * to end.
8th row: * p8; (p1, k1) 4 times; repeat from * to end.

Continue until work measures 25½ cm (10 inches) from beginning, ending with an 8th pattern row.

Shape crown

Next row: * Moss st 8, k1, p2, ybk, sl 1, yfwd, p2tog, psso, p2; repeat from * to end of row. [126 sts]

Next row: * k4, p2, moss st 8; repeat from * to end of row.

Next row: * Moss st 8, k2, sl 1, p2tog, psso, p1; repeat from * to end of row. [108 sts]

Next row: * k1, p3, moss st 8; repeat from * to end of row.

Next row: * Moss st 8, k1, sl 1, k2tog, psso; repeat from * to end of row. [90 sts]

Next row: Moss st to end of row.

Next row: * Moss st 7, sl 1, k2tog, psso; repeat from * to end of row. [72 sts]

Next row: Moss st to end of row.

Next row: * Moss st 5, sl 1, k2tog, psso; repeat from * to end of row. [54 sts]

Continue decreasing in this way on every alternate row until 18 sts remain. Break off yarn, thread through sts, draw up and fasten off.

To make up the Hat

Do not press.
Join back seam reversing 7½ cm (3 inches) at lower edge.
Press seam lightly under a damp cloth with a warm iron.
Turn back brim.

Trim with a large pom-pom.

Materials

7 x 50g balls 4 ply (fingering) yarn.

One pair 3¾ mm (UK 9) needles.
[Editors note: If you can't find 3¾ mm needles then you can use 3½ mm .]

Tension

26sts x 36 rows to 4 ins over moss stitch on 3¾ mm needles.

Size matters

Scarf: 28 cm (11 inches) wide, by 167½ cm (66 inches) long, excluding fringe
Hat: to fit average adult head, width round crown 56 cm (22 inches).

Abbreviations

k2tog: knit 2 sts together.

p2tog: purl 2 sts together.

ybk: put yarn to back of work.

yfwd: put yarn to front of work.

sl 1: slip 1 stitch

sl 1, k1, psso: slip 1, knit 1 / k2tog / p2tog, pass the slipped stitch over, (you decrease 1 stitch).

sl 1, k2tog (p2tog), psso: slip 1, k2tog, (p2tog), pass the slipped stitch over, (you decrease 2 sts).

moss stitch: knit alternate sts k1/p1 but place the knit stitch over a purl in the row below and the purl stitch over a knit stitch. (Also called "seed stitch").

A word on the wool.

The original yarn was standard 4 ply

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

NiceNEasyHat3.jpg

** Please note that the Sailors Society does seem to be a religious organisation, which I mention not through any disapproval on my part, but in case you would care to look at their website and ensure its aims do not go against anything you believe in.

October 2014

Coolie Hat

CoolieHat.jpg

An amusing little tweed hat from the 1950s for you to crochet.
It uses the same yarn and technique as the tweed coat for January 2015.

Instructions.

Note: The Bouclet is used double throughout with one ball of white together with one ball of black.

Begin at the centre crown.

Make 4 chain, join into a ring with a slip stitch

1st round: 9 dc through centre of ring, join with a slip stitch
2nd round: 3 ch; * 2 half trebles in 1 dc, 1 htr in 1 dc; repeat from * 3 times more; join with a slip stitch to top of 3 ch
All following half treble rounds are joined as in this round.
3rd round: 1 ch; * 2 dc in 1 htr, 1 dc in 1 htr; repeat from * 6 times more, join with a slip stitch to top of 1st ch
All following dc rounds are joined as in this round.

4th round: 3 ch; * 2 htr in 1 dc , 1 htr in l dc; repeat from * 9 times more.
5th round: 1 ch;* 2 dc in 1 htr, 2 dc in 2 htr; repeat from * 9 times more.
6th round: 3 ch; * 2 htr in 1 dc , 3 htr in 3 dc; repeat from * 9 times more.
7th round:
1 ch; * 1 dc in 1 htr; repeat from * all round.
8th round:
3 ch; * 4 htr in 4 dc, 2 htr in 1 dc ; repeat from * 9 times more.
9th round: 1 ch; * 1 dc in 1 htr; repeat from * all round.
10th round:
3 ch, * 5 htr in 5 dc, 2 htr in 1 dc ; repeat from * 9 times more.
11th round:
1 ch; * 1 dc in 1 htr; repeat from * all round.
12th round: 3 ch; * 6 htr in 6 dc, 2 htr in 1 dc; repeat from * 9 times more.
13th round:
1 ch;* 1 dc in 1 htr; repeat from * all round.
14th round:
3 ch; *7 htr in 7 dc, 2 htr in 1 dc; repeat from * 9 times more.
15th round: 1 ch; * 1 dc in 1 htr; repeat from * all round.
16th round: 3 ch; * 8 htr in 8 dc, 2 htr in 1 dc; repeat from * 9 times more.
17th round: 1 ch; * 1 dc in 1 htr; repeat from * all round.
18th round: 3 ch; * 9 htr in 9 dc, 2 htr in 1 dc; repeat from * 9 times more.
19th round: 1 ch; * 1 dc in 1 htr; repeat from * all round.
20th round: 3 ch; * 1 htr in 1 dc; repeat from * all round.
21st round: As 19th round.
22nd round:
As 20th round.
23rd round: As 19th round.

Fasten off.

Brim

Make 100 ch, join into a ring with a slip stitch.

1st round: 100 dc in 100 ch.
2nd, 3rd, and 4th rounds: As 1st round.
5th round: 3 ch, * 1 htr in 1 dc, 2 htr in 1 dc; repeat from * 49 times more.
6th round: Lay wire along edge of round just worked and work over the wire with 1 dc in 1 htr all round.
Cut wire allowing it to overlap by about 2 inches.

7th round: 3 ch, * 1 htr in 1 dc; repeat from * all round, join with a slip stitch.
8th - 11th rounds: As 6th round but
working over wire.
Cut wire leaving about 2 inches.

Fasten off securely.

To Make Up

Sew over bare ends of wire with wool.
Join brim to crown by placing the right sides together and work a row of back stitching g-inch in from edge.
Place hat over a basin and press with warm iron and a damp cloth.

Materials

2 ozs each in black and white of "bouclet" yarn.

[Editor's note: Please see "A word on the wool".]

A No 10 (3¼mm ) crochet hook
[Editor's note: If you cannot get a 3¼mm hook then you can use 3½mm or equivaent to get the right tension]

Millinery wire

Tension

10dc measures 2 inches

Size matters

To fit "an average head"

Crochet abbreviations:

ch: chain
dc: double crochet
htr: half treble

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet; htr is equivalent to US double crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and 1 will try and assist.

A word on the wool...

The orginal yarn was a fine bouclé knitting to a 4 ply tension - and almost 100% wool. The tweed effect of the hat is created using the yarn double with black and white together.
It is possible to find fine loopy yarns if you search - possibly on cones for machine knitting.

However, I think it is quite hard to work with yarn doubled at the best of times. I can only imagine that a bouclé would be even worse, and to crochet like this .... well you would need to be very determined. In defence of the original pattern, I think the bouclet specified was not a very loose loopy yarn; I believe it just has a gentle ripple in the spin.

So given that you have to find a substitute anyway, I would look for some kind of textured yarn which will give the right tension with a single strand - that would be a worsted or Aran weight - bearing in mind that the work is intended to have a tight tension to make a firm fabric suitable for a hat - even though you have some support with the wire.

In substituting you will have to gauge how much yarn to buy based on your own judgement. I have no yardage information to offer.

Whatever you choose - try out a swatch!

December 2013

Fireside Slippers

FiresideSlippers.jpg

A lovely old-fashioned pair of knitted slippers. Make them using a luxury yarn in a striking colour for a quickly knitted Christmas gift.

Instructions

Instructions in 3 sizes, each size separated by forward slash (/).

Both slippers are worked alike.

Slipper (make 2)

With No 11 needles, cast on 90/95/100 stitches and work 12 rows in garter stitch (that is: every row knitted).

Change to pattern as follows:

1st row: k4, * p2, k3; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, p2, k4.
2nd row: k1, p3, * p3, k2; repeat from * to last 4 stitches, p3, k1.

3rd row: k1, * wfwd, slip 1, k2tog, psso, wrn, p2, * to last 4 stitches, wfwd, slip 1, k2tog, psso, wrn, k1.
4th row: as 2nd row.

Repeat these 4 rows 3 times more, then rows 1-3 inclusive again: 19 pattern rows.

Work 5 rows in garter stitch.

Cast off.

Make a second slipper in the same way.

To Make Up

Press parts lightly on wrong side under a damp cloth.

Fold foot pieces in half and join centre back and foot seams neatly with a flat seam.

Thread ties through holes made in 19th row of the patterning.
You can find information from Sirdar on making ties here.

Press seams.

Note:
You may like to cover the soles of the slippers with a non-slip material such as a washable non-slip liner available in limited colours from (for example) Wilkinsons in the UK.

Materials

3/3/3oz Double Knitting yarn.

One pair each No 8 (4mm) needles.

Tension

22 stitches by 30rows to 4 inches over stocking stitch on 4mm needles

Size matters

To fit 3 sizes
small/medium/large.

Abbreviations

wrn: wool round needle
wfwd: wool forward

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.


....so.... speaking of quickly knitted gifts....

An extra Christmas gift just for you. Don't bother to thank me - it's priceless I think you'll agree.
Perfect if you are thinking of elf-themed fancy dress this Christmas - and I can recommend that you use any left-over felt to make a matching elfish pointy collar.

FiresideSlippers.jpg

They miss out the key instruction at the end of the making up section .... "Do not wear".
Joking apart, this method of threading ribbon or fabric strips through a crocheted mesh base is a good technique for creating an interesting textured fabric to work with. I have seen it used to good effect making, for example, an evening clutch bag, using more luxurious starting materials.

September 2013

Chic Beret and Outsize Bag

ChicBeretOutSizeBag.jpg

Elegantly modelled on location in the Boulevard des Capucines for Paris in Focus showing "hand knits from Paris: top fashion to knit in bulky wool"

Instructions

The bag is knitted in a variation on fisherman's rib, or brioche stitch, while the beret is plain.

Beret

Cast on 72 stitches and work 2½ ins. k1, p1 rib, working into the back of every stitch to give a twisted rib.

Shape crown as follows:

1st row: * k8, increase 1 by picking up horizontal thread lying before next stitch and knitting into back of it; repeat from * last 8 stitches, k8. [80 sts]
2nd row: (k1, p15) 5 times.
3rd row: (k15, p1) 5 times.
Repeat 2nd and 3rd rows twice more.

8th row: (k1, p1, increase 1 by picking up horizontal thread lying before next stitch and purling into back of it, p13, increase 1 as before, p1) 5 times: 90 stitches
9th row: (k17, p1) 5 times.
10th row: (K1, p17) 5 times.
Repeat the last 2 rows twice more.

15th row: (k2togtbl, k13, k2tog, p1) 5 times.
16th row: (k1, p15) 5 times.
17th row: (k15, p1) 5 times.
Repeat the last 2 rows once more.

20th row: (k1, p15) 5 times.
21st row: (k2togtbl, k11, k2tog, p1) 5 times.
22nd row: (k1, p13) 5 times.
23rd row: (k13, p1) 5 times.
24th row: (k1, p13) 5 times.
25th row: (k2togtbl, k9, k2tog, p1) 5 times.
26th row: (k1, p11) 5 times.
27th row: (k2togtbl, k7, k2tog, p1) 5 times.
28th row: (k1, p9) 5 times.
29th row: (k2togtbl, k5, k2tog, p1)5 times.
30th row: (k1, p7)5 times.

Continue decreasing 2 stitches thus in each stocking-stitch panel until 20 stitches remain.
Next Row: (k2tog) 10 times.
Next Row: (p2 tog.) 5 times.

Break wool, thread through remaining stitches, draw up and fasten off.

Stalk: Cast on 7 stitches and work 4 rows stocking-stitch; cast off.

Making up - beret

Press beret lightly on wrong side under a damp cloth, avoiding ribbing.
Roll stalk lengthways and stitch down, then sew firmly to top of beret.

Bag Sides (make two)

Starting at base edge, cast on 60 stitches and work 1 row k1, p1 rib.

Change to fancy rib pattern as follows:-

Next Row: slip 1 knitwise, * p1, knit into next stitch but through loop of row below at the same time slipping stitch above off needle; repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Repeat this row until piece measures 10 ins.
Continue in pattern casting off 7 stitches at the beginning of the next 2 rows.
Work 4 rows straight.
Cast off in pattern.

Make another piece the same.

Base:

Cast on 14 stitches and work in rib pattern exactly as for main part until piece measures 12 ins, slightly stretched.
Cast off in pattern.

Making up - bag

Make a hem across each piece of main part by folding over narrow piece at top to wrong side.
Cut lining to match front, back and base allowing a little extra for seams.
Join side seams of main part of bag with a flat seam (cast off stitches between hems form sides of bag).
Cover one side of cardboard strip by sticking down lining material for inside of bag. Now cover other side of cardboard base with knitted strip and stitch firmly to lining material all round edge.
Join side edges of lining material but do not turn to right side. Now fold back ½ an inch to the wrong side all round one edge of lining; sew this edge in position to base lining, pleating it at corners, so that right side of lining will be facing when you look into bag.
Place lining inside main part of bag, then join main part to knitted part of base very firmly all round edge.
Stitch top of lining in position ¾ inch down from top edge.
Unscrew ends of bars on frame, then slip each bar through hems. Place ends of bars into holes on frame bringing sides of bag inside ends of frame; screw knobs into position.
[Editor's note: The instructions in italics refer to a specific sort of frame - you will need to fit the handle according to the type you purchase.]

Materials

Beret: 2 hanks Patons Big Ben Knitting.
Bag: 7 hanks.
(Original colour: Black Watch 6141)

One pair of number 4 (6mm) needles.

Lining material for bag approximately 21 inches square.

Cardboard or stiffening for base 12x3½ inches;

9½ inch bag frame.
[Editor's note: Since you will be using a substitute yarn, I would wait until you have finished the bag and measure the opening before buying the handle.]

Tension

Equivalent to a basic tension of 15 stitches to 4 inches in stocking-stitch on No 4 needles.

Size matters

Beret: average size.
Bag: width at widest part: 13 ins; depth: 10 ins; width of base: 4 ins.

Abbreviations

k2tog: decrease by knitting 2 sts together.

k2togtbl: decrease by knitting 2 sts together through back loops, sometimes called ssk (slip 1 knitwise, slip 1 knitwise, place 2 sts back on left needle and knit 2 slipped sts together through back loops).

A Word on the Wool

I don't know the size of the Big Ben hanks, but I am guessing they were at least 2oz (around 50g). My experience with chunky weight yarn bags leads me to guess that at least 6 50g balls might be required.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

ChicBeretOutSizeBag2.jpg

ChicBeretOutSizeBagSketch.jpg

April 2013

Easter Baby Bonnet

EasterBonnetAndMitts.jpg

This looks like a little Victorian cherub, though the pattern is much later. It uses a combination of smooth and fluffy 4 ply yarns in a relatively simple crochet motif.
I think the bonnet is particularly cute.

Instructions:

The items are made by piecing together a basic motif:

Using blue colour (B), make 8 chain and join into a ring with a slip stitch.
1st round: 3 ch, 15 tr into ring; join to top of 3 ch with ss.
Fasten off B.
2nd round: Join in white (W); (1 dc into top of tr, 1 ch, miss 1 tr, 8 tr into next tr, 1ch, miss 1 tr) 4 times, join to 1 dc with ss.
Fasten off W.
3rd round: Join in B, and work 1 row dc all round.
Fasten off B.

Bonnet:

Make 14 motifs the same and join together as shown in diagram.


Back of bonnet:
Using colour B, make 29 ch.

1st row: 1 dc into 2nd ch from hook, 1 dc into each of next 27 ch
[28dc]

Continue in dc increasing 1 stitch at each end of every 4th row until there are 36 dc.
Continue straight until work measures 4 inches from the start.
Shape top of back piece by decreasing 1 stitch at each end of the next and every alternate row until 20 dc remain. Fasten off.

Making up the Bonnet:

Pin one edge of front piece up sides and all round top edge of back piece. With right side of work facing and B, crochet the 2 pieces together but working 4 dc into edge of back piece only between motifs Fasten off.
Using B, l work 2 rows dc along front edge of motifs.
Make 2 twisted cords in B about 8½ inches long, and sew one to each corner. Make 2 small tassels in W and sew to ends of cords.

Mitts:

Starting with the front of the mitts:

Using B, make 21 ch
1st row: 1 dc into 2nd ch from hook, 1 dc into next 18 ch, 3 dc into last ch, then 19 dc along other side of ch, turn.
2nd row: 18 dc in 18 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 3dc in 3 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 18 dc in 18 dc. [43 stitches]
3rd row: 18 dc in 18 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 5 dc in 5 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 18 dc in 18 dc.
4th row: 22 dc in 22 dc, 3 dc in 1 dc, 22 dc in 22 dc.
5th row: 21 dc in 21 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 3 dc in 3 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 21 dc in 21 dc.
6th row: 21 dc in 21 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 5 dc in 5 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 21 dc in 21 dc.
7th row: 25 dc in 25 dc, 3 dc in 1 dc,.25 dc in 25 dc.
8th row: 24 dc in 24 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 3 dc in 3 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 24 dc in 24 dc.
9th row: 23 dc in 23 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 7 dc in 7 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 23 dc in 23 dc.
10th row: 23 dc in 23 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 9 dc in 9 dc, 2 dc in 1 dc, 23 dc in 23 dc.
Fasten off.

Now work the back of the mitts:

Work 2 motifs as given for bonnet and join together as before.

With right side of motifs facing, start in corner and work along one long edge as follows:-
9 dc across 1st motif, 3 ch across space, 9 dc across 2nd motif.
Now work along top (short edge) work 5 dc, 3 dc into centre stitch, 5 dc
Continue down other side with 9 dc, 3 ch, 9 dc. [55 stitches]

Turn and work 9th and 10th rows as given for front of mitt.
Fasten off.

Thumb: Using B, make 2 ch.
1st row: 1 dc into 1st ch, 1 ch, turn.
2nd row: 1 dc into 1st dc, 2 dc into turning ch, 1 ch, turn. (3 dc)
Continue in dc increasing 1 stitch at each end of every alternate row until there are 11 dc.
Work 2 rows in dc.
Mark last row with a coloured thread.
Continue straight in dc for a further 1 inch.
Shape top.
Next row: miss 1 dc, 1 dc in 1 dc all along. [5 dc]
Fasten off.

Join thumb seam from top down as far as marker.
Starting at cuff edge, stitch thumb gusset in position between front and back, then join rest of mitt together.

Cuff.
Using B, work 40 dc all round lower edge of mitt.
Next round: 1 dc in 1 dc all round.
Next row (make holes for cord): (2 dc in 2 dc, 2 ch, miss 2 dc) 10 times, join with ss. to 1st dc.
Work a further 6 rounds dc.
Fasten off.

Making up the mitts:

Make another mitt in the same way but inserting thumb on opposite side to first mitt when making up.
Using W, make 2 twisted cords; thread through holes round wrists to tie at back.

Materials

2 ozs 4 ply, in Powder Blue and
1 oz angora 4 ply in White

One No 12 (2¾mm) crochet hook.

Tension

Each motif measures about 2 inches square. 6½ dc to an inch over plain dc.

Size matters

Bonnet: All round front edge measures 15½ inches.
Mitts: Length 5½ inches.

Crochet abbreviations:

ch: chain
dc: double crochet
tr: treble
ss: slip stitch

[Editor's note: Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.]

A word on the wool.

Original yarn was Patons Beehive 4ply and Fuzzy Wuzzy angora.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

October 2012

Cloche Cap

ClocheCap.jpg

Charming retro hat with decorative band and buckle.

I learned from the Debbie Bliss Magazine Autumn/Winter 2012 that one of my favourite designers, Louisa Harding, has been facing up, with her husband, to his challenge of being treated for lymphoma. In appreciation for the help of Macmillan nurses, Louisa is taking part in Macmillan's Nepal Hiking Challenge and seems well on her way to raising her goal of £5000.
To help achieve the target She has put together a series of seven knitting patterns called 'Himalayan Hiking Hats'. She will have her photo taken wearing each one of the hats on the first 6 days of the trek. The seventh hat pattern in the series will be knitted 'en route' and photographed on the 7th (last) trekking day.
Download the hat patterns from her site and show your support by sending a donation.

Instructions.

The main hat is knitted in reverse stocking stitch, with the band in garter stitch. The design is intended for a textured yarn.

Crown

Using the 5 No 10 needles, cast on 8 stitches, placing 2 stitches on each of 4 needles.

1st (and every alternate) round: purl
2nd round: knit twice into every stitch. [16 sts]
4th round: * k1 knit twice in next stitch; repeat from * all round. [24 sts]
Mark end of round with a contrast thread, or stitch marker.

6th round: * k2, knit twice in next stitch; repeat from * all round. [32 sts]
8th round: * k3, knit twice in next stitch; repeat from * all round. [40 sts]

Continue increasing 8 stitches thus on every alternate round until there are 36 stitches on each needle. [144 stitches]
Work 7 rounds straight.

Next round: * k16, k2tog; repeat from * all round. [136 sts]
Work 2 rounds straight.
Next round: * k15, k2tog; repeat from * all round. [128 sts]
Work 2 rounds straight.
Next round: * k14, k2tog; repeat from * all round. [120 sts]
Work 2 rounds straight.
Next round: * k13, k2tog; repeat from * all round. [112 sts]
Work 5 rounds straight.

Cast off.

Band

Cast on 16 stitches, and work a strip in garter-stitch (every row knit) 22 inches long - or length required to fit round head with 3 inches to spare. Now decrease 1 stitch at each end of the next and every alternate row until 2 stitches remain; k2tog and fasten off. This forms a point.
Using the wool double, crochet all round the outer edge of the buckle to cover.
[Editor's note: I think this might be trickier than it sounds - either due to the bouclé nature of the yarn or the thickness of the hook you'd need to use. I might be tempted to try a blanket or button-hole stitch around the buckle using the yarn single and a large-eyed darning needle.]

Stitch the cast-on edge of the band to the buckle, then slot the shaped end through the buckle pulling it through until the band fits round the head snugly.
[Editor's note: Again a slight inconsistency in the instructions and the photo here. I don't think it matters if you have a buckle with or without a tongue. If the latter, arrange the size you need and just push the tongue through the knitting. You should catch stitch the band in place, ensuring that it looks as though the end is free, that is, as if you had not stitched it.]

To Make Up

Pin band in position evenly all round crown noting that the purl side of the crown is the right side.
Sew neatly in position stretching band slightly.
Press seam and crown very lightly under a damp cloth using a rolled towel inside hat to keep the shape.

Materials

3 ozs Patons Rimple double knitting in colour Harlequin 1572.

A set of five of No 10 (3¼mm) needles, pointed at both ends.

A 2½ inch buckle.

Crochet hook.

Tension

24 sts to 4 inches.

Size matters

An average hat size.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.


A word on the wool.

Patons Rimple was a softly textured bouclé yarn, (97% wool, 3% nylon), which knitted to a double knitting tension.

This hat is knitted on finer needles than usual so the knitted fabric will be denser and stiffer, giving the hat more body.

There are a few double knitting bouclé yarns available though many tend to be chunky weight. Debbie Bliss seems to have discontinued the Cashmerino Astrakhan but you can still obtain it at some outlets on the internet (and often discounted). Rowan have recently brought out a British Sheep Breeds "fine" bouclé but this still seems to knit up to a chunkier tension. You can try and obtain the right tension with finer needles - and I think this would produce an excellent knitted fabric for the hat - but be warned that knitting bouclé tightly on small needles is very hard work.

I cannot supply the yardage of Rimple, and can only guess that "Harlequin" was a multi-coloured tweed.

April 2012

Easter Bonnet

AliceBandBonnet3.jpg

This type of bonnet was very popular in the 1950s - at least it was much favoured by Paton and Baldwin, using their Fuzzy Wuzzy angora**. I think, following the 1940s roll, it went with the more modern shorter hairstyles, and was possibly the half-way house to what was essentially the demise of the hat for everyday wear. Anyway - I am sure they explored every possible variation on this basic style.

**Perhaps not the best marketing brand for today's knitters.... However, angora wool is very light weight and was sold in half ounce balls; this gives you the clue that it was relatively expensive, so a tiny little cap - or perhaps bolero - was ideally affordable. (And did I mention fluffy? even I - never allergic to anything - am prone to fits of sneezing when wearing angora).

Note that there are two versions of the bonnet for different yarn weights.

Instructions for the double knitting bonnet

Pattern stitch is worked over 6 rows:

1st row (right side facing): * p3, k3, p3; leave wool forward (wfd), k2tog; repeat from * to last 9 sts; p3, k3, p3.
2nd row: * k3, p1, k1, p1, k3, p2; repeat from * to last 9 sts; k3, p1, k1, p1, k3.
3rd row: * p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3, k2tog, wrn; repeat from * to last 9 sts; p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: as first row.
6th row: as second row.

[Editor's note: The above pattern repeat of 6 rows is as given in the original instructions. If you compare the photo below with my version, you will see the eyelet arrangement is slightly different between the two. I worked (k2tog, wrn) and then (wrn, k2tog) alternately on the right side rows; this does not fit with the 6 row repeat of the mock cables. I have not written out my resulting 12 row repeat for you, but if you want to do this it is quite simple to keep track of the two patterns as you knit, one having a 4 row repeat, and the other, a 6 row repeat. Knit to the correct number of rows overall, and make sure you keep it consistent when you get to the decrease rows. ]

AliceBandBonnet.jpg

To Make:

Cast on cast on 64sts using the knit cast-on method to give a loose edge. Work 9 rows in stocking stitch (one row knit, one row purl), ending with a knit row. Now make the hem for the hair-band casing as follows:

Hem row (purl side facing, which is the right side of the work): Fold the hem so that the cast on edge is aligned at the back of the needle containing your working sts; * knit one stitch on the needle with one loop from the cast on edge; repeat from * to end.
Next row(wrong side facing) : knit.

Now commence the pattern - work the 6 pattern rows five times.

Start the shaping:

31st row (first shaping row): p3, k3, p3; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, p1, k3, p1, p2tog; repeat from * to last 11sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3. [56sts]
32nd row: k3, p1, k1, p1, k3; * p2, k2, p1, k1, p1, k2; repeat from * to last 11sts; p2, k3, p1, k1, p1, k3.
33rd row: p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3; * k2tog, wrn, p2, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p2; repeat from * to last 11sts; k2tog, wrn, p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3.
34th row: as 32nd row.
35th row: p3, k3, p3; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2, k3, p2; repeat from * to last 11sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3.
36th row: as 32nd row.

37th row (second shaping row): p3, k3, p3; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, k3, p2tog; repeat from * to last 11sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3. [48sts]
38th row: k3, p1, k1, p1, k3; * p2, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1; repeat from * to last 11sts; p2, k3, p1, k1, p1, k3.
39th row: p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3; * k2tog, wrn, p1, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p1; repeat from * to last 11sts; k2tog, wrn, p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3.
40th row: as 38th row.
41st row: p3, k3, p3; * leave wfd, k2tog, p1, k3, p1; repeat from * to last 11sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3.
42nd row: as 38th row.

43rd row (third shaping row): p3, k3, p3; * leave wfd, k3tog, k2, sl1, k1, psso; repeat from * to last 11sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3. [40sts]
44th row: k3, p1, k1, p1, k3, p3, k1; * p4, k1; repeat from * twice more; p3, k3, p1, k1, p1, k3.
45th row: p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3; * k2tog, wfd, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso; repeat from * 3 times more; k2tog, wrn, p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3.
46th row: k3, p1, k1, p1, k3; purl to the last 9 sts; k3, p1, k1, p1, k3.

Next row: Cast off 9sts; knit to the last 9sts; cast off 9 and fasten off.
Thread a strand of wool through the remiaing sts, draw up and fasten off.

To Complete

Pin out and press the work lightly on the wrong side with a warm iron over a damp cloth.
Join the cast-off edges together to form the centre back seam.

With the right side of the bonnet facing you, join the wool to one side edge, at the inner edge of the hem (ie do not crochet the ends of the hem together, as you need to thread your plastic hair band into it), and work one row of double crochet all around the neck edge, finishing atthe same position on the opposite side of the front. Draw the edge in slightly as you work.
Turn the work and and work 1dc into each dc of the preceding row.
Run 4 rows of elastic thread through the wrong side of the dc edging and draw up the threads to measure about 11 inches, or more if necessary.

Slip the hair band through the front casing, and then seam the short ends to close it off.

Sew in and neaten all ends.

Materials

Original materials called for: 2 ozs double knitting wool.

One pair of No 7 (4½mm) needles. One No 11 (3mm) crochet hook.

1½ yards elastic thread.

A plastic hair band.

Tension

21 sts and 29 rows to 4 inches.

Size matters

To fit "an average head".
[Editor's note: I suggest that the fit will mainly be controlled by the size of the purchased head band, although I note from the photos that the DK version seems to fit more snugly than the 3-ply.]

Abbreviations

inc: increase by working into the front and back of the next stitch.
k2tog: knit two stitches together.
wrn: wool round needle
wfwd: wool forward
wtb: wool to back
s1: slip one stitch
psso: pass the slipped stitch over

dc: double crochet.
[Editor's note: Remember this is English crochet where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.]

A word on the wool.

Original yarn Sirdar Majestic.

I used Phildar Partner 6 in a lovely red shade, (50% nylon, 25% wool, 25% acrylic).
The stated 2oz required is about 56g. A standard DK 50g ball is usually around 90-100m and this should be sufficient. Partner 6 has 66m/71yds per 50g and I needed more than one 50g ball.
Partner 6 is an Aran weight - almost even chunky - yarn.
Consequently I used No 8 (4mm) needles thinking this would still turn out slightly larger than intended. However this combination produced the required tension spot on - and actually I wish it were a shade larger. It is definitely the incorporated Alice Band that keeps this type of hat firmly on your head.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.



Here is the same bonnet in a finer yarn. Normally, I would say finer yarns make a better result, (I know: "it depends"...). However, I actually prefer the double knit version of this style which seems better proportioned.

AliceBandBonnet2.jpg

Instructions for the 3-ply bonnet

Pattern stitch is worked over 6 rows:

1st row (right side facing): * p5, k3, p5; leave wool forward (wfd), k2tog; repeat from * to last 13sts; p5, k3, p5.
2nd row: * k5, p1, k1, p1, k5, p2; repeat from * to last 13sts; k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
3rd row: * p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5, k2tog, wrn; repeat from * to last 13sts; p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: as first row.
6th row: as second row.

To Make:

Cast on cast on 103sts using the knit cast-on method to give a loose edge. Work 11 rows in stocking stitch (one row knit, one row purl), ending with a knit row. Now make the hem for the hair-band casing as follows:

Hem row (purl side facing, which is the right side of the work): Fold the hem so that the cast on edge is aligned at the back of the needle containing your working sts; * knit one stitch on the needle with one loop from the cast on edge; repeat from * to end.
Next row(wrong side facing) : knit.

Now commence the pattern - work the 6 pattern rows eight times.

Start the shaping:

49th row (first shaping row): p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, p3, k3, p3, p2tog; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5. [93sts]
50th row: k5, p1, k1, p1, k5; * p2, k4, p1, k1, p1, k4; repeat from * to last 15sts; p2, k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
51st row: p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5; * k2tog, wrn, p4, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p4; repeat from * to last 15sts; k2tog, wrn, p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
52nd row: as 50th row.
53rd row: p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p4, k3, p4; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5.
54th row: as 50th row.

55th row (second shaping row): p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, p2, k3, p2, p2tog; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5. [83sts]
56th row: k5, p1, k1, p1, k5; * p2, k3, p1, k1, p1, k3; repeat from * to last 15sts; p2, k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
57th row: p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5; * k2tog, wrn, p3, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p3; repeat from * to last 15sts; k2tog, wrn, p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
58th row: as 56th row.
59th row: p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p3, k3, p3; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5.
60th row: as 56th row.

61st row (third shaping row): p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, p1, k3, p1, p2tog; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5. [73sts]
62nd row: k5, p1, k1, p1, k5; * p2, k2, p1, k1, p1, k2; repeat from * to last 15sts; p2, k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
63rd row: p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5; * k2tog, wrn, p2, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p2; repeat from * to last 15sts; k2tog, wrn, p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
64th row: as 62nd row.
65th row: p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2, k3, p2; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5.
66th row: as 62nd row.

67th row (fourth shaping row): p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p2tog, k3, p2tog; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5. [63sts]
68th row: k5, p1, k1, p1, k5; * p2, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1; repeat from * to last 15sts; p2, k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
69th row: p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5; * k2tog, wrn, p1, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p1; repeat from * to last 15sts; k2tog, wrn, p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
70th row: as 68th row.
71st row: p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, p1, k3, p1; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5.
72nd row: as 68th row.

73rd row (fifth shaping row): p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, k1, k3tog, k1; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5. [53sts]
74th row: k5, p1, k1, p1, k5; * p3, k1; repeat from * to the last 16sts; p3, k5, p1, k1, p1, k5.
75th row: p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5; * k2tog, wrn, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso; repeat from * to the last 15sts; k2tog, wrn, p5, wtb, sl1, inc in next st, k1, psso, p5.
76th row: as 74th row.
77th row: p5, k3, p5; * leave wfd, k2tog, k3; repeat from * to last 15sts; leave wfd, k2tog, p5, k3, p5.

Next row: Cast off 13sts; knit to the last 13sts; cast off 13 and fasten off.
Thread a double strand of wool through the remiaing sts, draw up and fasten off.

To Complete

Press and complete as for the double knitting version of the bonnet.

Materials

Original materials called for: 1oz of 3-ply fingering wool.

One pair of No 11 (3mm) needles.
One No 12 (2¾mm) crochet hook.

1½ yards elastic thread.

A plastic hair band.

Tension

30 sts and 44 rows to 4 inches.

Size matters

To fit "an average head".
[Editor's note: From the photo this bonnet seems to work out larger than the DK version. That is: the gathering or "drawing in" at the neck edge seems to be more pronounced. Normally I would say that the "fine" knitting produces a nicer result than chunkier but I think I prefer the DK version in this case.]

Abbreviations

inc: increase by working into the front and back of the next stitch.
k2tog: knit two stitches together.
wrn: wool round needle
wfwd: wool forward
wtb: wool to back
s1: slip one stitch
psso: pass the slipped stitch over

dc: double crochet.

A word on the wool.

Original yarn Sirdar Majestic.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

December 2010

Winter Wonder Hat

WinterWonderHat6.jpg

This is a very flattering hat - speaking as one who has difficulty with hats, which always leads to sartorial dilemmas in weather such as we have in the UK at the moment. However, not only flattering and warm, but amazingly speedy to knit, which can be very useful at this time of year. I completed it in one afternoon.

Instructions.

The main part of the hat is a simple six-row pattern where you increase at the beginning and decrease at the end of every alternate row to create the diagonal effect. At the same time you alternate 3-row bands of stocking stitch and reverse sticking stitch.

Side

Cast on 20sts.
[Editor's note: I cast on in waste wool, and when I had completed the 12 patterns (see below) I grafted the sts together instead of seaming.]

1st row: Knit
2nd row: P2tog, purl to the last stitch, purl twice in the last stitch.
3rd row: Knit
4th row: K2tog, knit to the last stitch, knit twice in the last stitch.
5th row: Purl
6th row: K2tog, knit to the last stitch, knit twice in the last stitch.

These 6 rows form the pattern.
Continue until 12 complete patterns have been worked from the start. Cast off.
[Editor's note: I did not cast off but grafted the sts to the cast on row by removing the waste wool and unpicking my first knit row, using this yarn tail to graft. This makes a perfect join.]

Brim

With right side facing, pick up and knit 72sts along one edge of the side piece - that is 3 sts to each knit and purl stripe.
[Editor's note: As I had already seamed the side piece into a tube shape, I used a circular needle to pick up the 72sts and knit the brim.]

Work 10 rows in k1/p1 rib, and then cast off in rib.

Join side piece and brim neatly with a flat seam.
[Editor's note: If you have not already grafted the side together.....]

Press seam lightly.

Crown

Cast on 14sts, and work in stocking stitch, starting with a purl row (this is right side of work), and increasing at each end of the first and every alternate row until there are 28 sts.

Knit one row.

Then continue, decreasing at each end of next and every following alternate row until 14sts remain.

Cast off.

To Make Up

Pin crown in position to side of hat on wrong side, so that purl side of crown is on the outside. Back stitch in position very neatly on wrong side with a tailored seam
Press seam lightly on the right side using a damp cloth.

Fold ribbed brim in half to wrong side and slip stitch in position round lower edge.

Place on head.
Admire.

Wrap in Christmas paper. Put under tree.

Materials

Original materials called for: 2 (2 oz) hanks Patons Big Ben Knitting in white.
Sample shown uses some handspun yarn.

A pair of No 2 (7mm) needles.

Tension

12 sts to 4 inches.

Size matters

To fit an average sized head.

Abbreviations

Increase: increase by knitting into front and back of the next stitch.
k2tog: (decrease) knit 2 sts together.
p2tog: (decrease) purl 2 sts together.

A word on the wool.

Big Ben was quite a novelty bulky wool in its time. There were no substitutes short of knitting several strands of thinner yarn together to make the right tension (as I did with my handspun).
These days we have a number of bulky wools to try; the hat is fairly forgiving as the knit and purl stripes are stretchy like ribbing.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

WinterWonderHat5.jpg

Handspun Yarn

I bought some Spelsau fleece at Woolfest in 2009; there was a workshop on knitting direct from the fleece but I intended to spin my sample. I made a 2 ply yarn which was softer than I had expected, but kempy (as I had not attempted to remove the coarser fibres). There was only a small amount - I did not measure the yardage, but I started with 100g, the yarn was chunky weight, and I knitted 2 strands of yarn together by combining it with an aran-weight handspun merino/silk blend to achive the bulky weight required. As you can see, the fleece was a lovely combination of natural grey tones.
The 100g sample was sufficient to knit the side and brim of the hat, but not the crown - I spun some of the coarser fibre from my Leicester Longwool fleece and combined that with the merino/silk as before to get the right yarn weight and drape, (quite a firm knitted fabric).

The description of the Spelsau fleece is as follows (taken from the reference above):

The Spaelsau is a direct ancestor to the Old Norwegian Sheep.They were tough sheep supplying their masters with meat, milk, wool, skin - even the sails that carried the ships over the oceans were made of their wool. Today, a thousand years later, the wool of the Spaelsau still consists of a rough cover to protect against the wind and the rain, and under this a much softer layer close to the skin as protection against the cold.
The rocky Norwegian west coast is Spaelsau country. On a few isolated isles among the skerries off the coast you still find Old Norwegian Sheep living wild.

April 2008

Woolly Hats for Sailors

ThreeHats.jpg

This wasn't my intended pattern for April, but I received a leaflet through the post telling me about the Sailors' Society [**please see footnote at the end], who are launching their woolly hat campaign for 2008. The campaign's aim is to provide seafarers arriving in the UK, (from foreign climates and thus ill-prepared for our weather), with hand-knitted hats to keep warm. Also worth noting is that these sailors often spend many months at sea in harsh conditions, sometimes not even speaking the same language as their colleagues, and these gifts can give a feeling of belonging and overcome feelings of isolation.

Last year's Woolly Hat Campaign saw over 15,000 hats distributed to seafarers throughout the UK and to Russia, Antwerp and South America, with over 6,000 given as part of Christmas packages.
If this inspires you, here are some patterns.

If you don't like any of these three hat patterns I have given for this month, the Yarn Harlot has an excellent free pattern for a "seriously quick hat".

** Please note that the Sailors Society does seem to be a religious organisation, which I mention not through any disapproval on my part, but in case you would care to look at their website and ensure its aims do not go against anything you believe in.

Fisherman’s Rib Hat

FishermanHat.jpg

This is my favourite hat of the three this month. It's simple, warm, comfortable, and looks like a serious seafarer's hat! Even though I don't like knitting rib that much, and Fisherman's rib means you have to put in a lot more knitting to get the length you need.... it was nonetheless very satisfying.

Instructions

With No. 6 (5mm) circular needle cast on 68 stitches, and join into a round, and purl the first round. Place a stitch marker to mark the beginning of the round.
Editor's note: Often when you cast on it tends to be tighter and have less give than the knitting, so with a hat band you need to make an effort to cast on loosely, especially if designed to fold back. Ravelry knitter kellyincville commented that it she would do the cast on and do the first row with a larger needle, which is excellent advice for this hat.
Now work in Fisherman's rib stitch as follows:

1st round: * K1B (knit one below, by knitting into the stitch below the next stitch, and slipping both sts off the needle together); p1. Repeat from * to end of round.
2nd round: * K1; P1B, (Purl one below). Repeat from * to end of round.

These 2 rounds form the pattern. Continue in pattern until work measures 9inches from the beginning, ending with round 2.

Shape Crown as follows, keeping continuity of the pattern:
Editor's note: Ravelry knitter kellyincville noted that when you get to the k1/p1 rib used for these decreases, the ribbing is noticeably tighter than the the fisherman's rib. I regarded this as part of the crown pattern, which is only just visible in the photo, but she points out that you could go up a size on the needles to compensate.

Next round: (K3tog; p1,k1,p1) 11 times; k2tog. [45 sts]
Next 3 rounds: K1, p1, rib to last st, k1. [45 sts]
Next round: (K3tog; p3tog) 7times; k3tog. [15 sts]
Next 3 rounds: K1, p1, rib to last st, k1. [15 sts]
Next round: (K3tog; p3tog) twice; k3tog. [5 sts]
Next round: K1, p1, k1, p1, k1. [5 sts]

Break yarn, thread through remaining sts; draw up and fasten off securely.

Making up:
Sew in all ends, and turn back brim as required.

Changing the hat size, or substituting the wool.

You may want to alter the size (circumference) of your hat, or compensate for a different gauge.

Simply work out how many sts you need to cast on according to your own gauge eg divide the number of sts by 16 and multiply by the number of sts you knit to 4 inches.
To work in Fisherman's rib, you need an even number of stitches.

A word on the wool.

If you work in pure wool you may need more than my stated quantities of yarn. Fisherman's rib is a very yarn-hungry stitch which produces a satisfying elasticated bulky fabric, by effectively knitting the yarn double, (nice and warm!).

Original pattern called for 3 x 50g balls Patons Husky Chunky, which is a pure wool chunky; the blend I used, no doubt, has a better yardage.
Patons Husky Chunky knitted to a tension of 7.5sts and 10 rows to 2 inches.

Materials

Example shown is knitted in 3 x 40g balls of vintage Argyll Ferndale Shetland Chunky (an acrylic and wool blend).

Size 6 (5mm) and circular needle - short length suitable for a hat.

Tension

Approx. 8st to 2 inches on No 6 (5mm) needles.

Size matters

There is a lot of give in the ribbed stitch, making the sizing very flexible.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

Moss and Blackberry Stitch Hat

MossHat.jpg

A 1970s hat using blackberry stitch, with a moss stitch brim. George did not think this was very "manly", but I leave that artistic decision to you, [George has also had experience of "life on the ocean wave" and says that as long as it's warm it will be welcome].

Instructions

With No. 6 (5mm) circular needle cast on 89 stitches, and work in rounds of k1, p1, moss stitch for 3 inches. Increase 7sts evenly across the last row. [96 sts]

Change to No. 4 (6mm) circular needle and work pattern as follows:

[Editor's note: this pattern (blackberry stitch) is worked over groups of 4 sts, and the hat is knitted up from the wrong side throughout.]

1st round: (wrong side) Knit.
2nd round: * P3tog; (k1,p1,k1) into the next st. Repeat from * to end of round.
3rd round: as first
4th round: * (k1,p1,k1) into the next st; p3tog. Repeat from * to end of round.

These 4 rows form the pattern. Continue in pattern until work measures 8½ inches from the beginning, ending with round 4.

Shape Top as follows, keeping continuity of the pattern:

Next round: K1 *k2, k2tog. Repeat from * to last st., k1. [72 sts]
Work 3 pattern rounds 2, 3 and 4.
[Editor's note: You can't keep the pattern bobbles in line with the previous work during the decreasings; just make the bobbles evenly across the rounds as before.]

Next round: *K2tog, k1. Repeat from * to end of round. [48 sts]
Work 3 pattern rounds.
Next round: *K2tog. Repeat from * to end of round. [24 sts]
Work 3 pattern rounds.
Next round: *K2tog. Repeat from * to end of round. [12 sts]
Work 1 round.

Break yarn, thread through remaining sts; draw up and fasten off securely.

Making up:
Sew in all ends.

Changing the hat size, or substituting the wool.

You may want to alter the size (circumference) of your hat, or compensate for a different gauge.

Simply work out how many sts you need to cast on according to your own gauge eg divide the number of sts by 18 and multiply by the number of sts you knit to 4 inches.
To work in moss stitch, you need to use an odd number of sts and work k1,p1 on every round.

Do the same calculation when increasing for the blackberry stitch, taking note that your number of sts needs to be divisible by 4.

Example: I have a gauge of 18 sts to 4 inches on no UK 6 (5mm) needles.
You have a gauge of, say, 15 sts to 4 inches (that is: your wool is thicker than mine).

Cast on 89 sts becomes 89/18*15 = 74, and you cast on 75, as it needs to be an odd number.

Increase evenly to 96 sts becomes 96/18*15 = 80.
For this hat, you need the number of stitches picked up to be divisible by 4, and 80 is exactly divisible by 4 so you are OK.
If not add or subtract a couple of sts until you get a number divisible by 4.

Materials

Example shown is knitted in 2x 50g balls of vintage Richard Poppleton Emmerdale Chunky Tweed (an acrylic and wool blend).

Size 6 (5mm) and size 4 (6mm) circular needles - short length suitable for a hat.

Tension

Approx. 9st to 2 inches on No 6 needles.

Size matters

This hat worked out to about 22 inches head circumference. My estimate is that "to fit an average sized head" means 22/23 inches for a man's size and 20-22 inches for a woman's size.
See "altering the size" below.

A word on the wool.

Original pattern called for Patons Husky Chunky, which was, I think a pure wool chunky, somewhat bulkier than the one I used.
It knitted to a tension of 7.5sts and 10 rows to 2 inches. However, the implied hat size was very large, so I have not altered the original pattern sts according to my gauge, but have allowed the hat to knit up slightly smaller than the original.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

Cable Band Hat

CableBandHat.jpg

This 1970s style hat is constructed by knitting a cabled band and then picking up stitches to knit the rest of the hat - which in this example is ribbed. This version is is not intended to have a turned back brim; if you want one, then you must knit the rib section longer; you will not have to reverse any workings as the rib section is reversible, so could be worn either way out. The single layer construction is very economic on yarn; For my wool/acrylic blend, I used 58g.

Instructions

With No. 5 (5½mm) needles cast on 11 stitches, and work in cable pattern as follows:
[Editor's note: I cast on with waste wool, so I could remove it later and graft the ends of the band together.]

1st row: (wrong side) K3, p6, k2.
2nd row: P2, k6, p1, k2.
Repeat 1st and second rows twice more, then the 1st row again.

8th row: (right side facing) P2, cable 6 (slip the first 3 sts onto a cable needle and leave at the front of the work; k3, then k3 from cable needle); p1, k2.

9th - 14th rows: Repeat 1st and second rows 3 times.

Repeat 1st - 14th rows 8 times more (9 patterns in all) ending with row 13. Graft the sts to the cast-on edge to form a circular band, [or cast off the 11 sts and sew the cast-on to the cast-off edge].

[Editor's note: If you want to alter the size (circumference) of your hat, now is the time to do it. Lengthen or shorten this band to the circumference you want to achieve. See "altering the size" below.]

One edge of the band has a neat "finished" garter st edging and the other has a reverse stocking stitch edge, which you will use to continue knitting the hat in the round.
Change to number 6 (5mm) circular needle and, with right side of work facing, pick up 92 sts evenly around the reverse stocking stitch edge.

Work in rounds of k2, p2 rib for 5 inches (about 28) rows.

Shape Crown as follows:

1st round: *K2tog, p2. Repeat from * to end of round.
2nd round: *K1, p2. Repeat from * to end of round.

Repeat rounds 2 five times more.

8th round: *K1, p2tog. Repeat from * to end of round.
9th round: *slip1, k2tog, pass the slipped st over; p1. Repeat from * to end of round.

Break yarn, thread through remaining sts; draw up and fasten off securely.

Making up:
Sew in all ends.

Changing the hat size, or substituting the wool.

You may want to alter the size (circumference) of your hat, or compensate for a different gauge.

This pattern relies on making an even number of cables around the hat, so to lengthen or shorten the band, you can either add in whole or partial pattern repeats, or, if you feel up to it, you could alter the number of rows in the pattern repeat of the cable.

Test your gauge before you start and work out how many rows you need to make your chosen head circumference size. Start by dividing the number of rows you calculate by 14, and then try some other numbers, eg 12, 16, 13, or 15, until you are close to getting an exact number of patterns. [Note that if you choose to work to an uneven number of rows in the repeat, then you will end up doing your cable operations on purl rows, which is quite feasible, but approach with caution if your are a beginner in this field!]

If the above all sounds hopeless to you, then just knit until the band is the length you require, and just sew the ends of the band together rather than trying to graft it. You could even work the hat on two needles instead of in the round, by picking up the stitches from the band before you sew it up, - and then, when you have finished, you sew a side seam into the hat, including the band.

Finally if you are altering the size, or compensating for a different gauge, you will probably need to pick up a different number of stitches from the band. I usually pick up a number of stitches equal to three quarters of the number of rows I have knitted.
Example: I knitted 9 pattern repeats of 14 rows which equals 126 rows in total. Then 126*3/4 = 94.5.
For this hat, you need the number of stitches picked up to be divisible by 4, and I chose to pick up 92sts. I could equally have chosen 96.

Materials

Example shown is knitted in 2x 50g balls of vintage Richard Poppleton Emmerdale Chunky Tweed (an acrylic and wool blend).

Two size 5 (5½mm) needles and a size 6 (5mm) circular needle - short length suitable for a hat.

Tension

Approx. 9st to 2 inches on No 6 needles.

Size matters

This hat worked out to about 22 inches head circumference. My estimate is that "to fit an average sized head" means 22/23 inches for a man's size and 20-22 inches for a woman's size.
See "altering the size" below.

A word on the wool.

Original pattern called for Patons Double plus, which was a double knitting wool, and the instructions were to knit the yarn double, producing a tension of 7.5sts and 10 rows to 2 inches.
The hat was "unisex" but shown modelled on a woman.
I have compensated for changing the wool, and made the hat slightly larger - my own version is printed here, not the original.
The original instructions were to knit 8 pattern repeats for the band, and to pick up 86 sts for the hat, which was not knitted in the round.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

October 2007

Cool-cat cable beret

cable_beret.jpg

Hats are not my thing but I am fond of berets. Here is an irresistible 1970's two-tone design - the original in two glaring shades of gold and yellow. Consider also making it in orange with a strawberry or coffee contrast - I can vouch for this as a popular contemporary combination and you can view it as part of Southwest airlines hostess uniforms from the same period (although the colour of the uniforms is possibly not as striking as the hot pants and knee boots of the period...).
Alternatively just stick with more reserved single colour in traditional white Aran, understated and letting the pattern speak for itself.

Cable Pattern

Row 1: P3, k6, p3.
Row 2: K3, p6, k3.
Rows 3-8: Repeat first and second rows 3 times.
Row 9: P3, c3f, p3. [c3f = cable 3 front by working across 6 sts as follows: slip next 3 sts on to a cable needle and leave at front of work, knit next 3 sts, then knit 3sts from the cable needle].
Row 10: K3, p6, k3.

These 10 rows form the pattern.

Special note: Wind 5 small balls of yarn in each colour. Use a separate ball for each cable and panel, and twist the colours where they meet to avoid gaps in work ("intarsia method").

Instructions

Using No. 10 needles and medium colour (M), cast on 106 stitches, and work 9 rows k1, p1 rib.

[Editor's note: If you work the beret in 2 colours then work over 2 needles as described. If you work in a single colour, you could work this in the round, reversing knit and purl sts on wrong side rows.]

Next row: (p1, p into front and back of next st) twice, * p2, p into front and back of next st, p1, p into front and back of next st; repeat from * to the last 7sts, (p1, p into front and back of next st) 3 times; p into front and back of last st. [150 sts].

Change to No 7 needles.

Next row: (right side) * k22 in M; join in light (L), k2, (k into front and back of next st) 4 time, k2; repeat from * to end. [170 sts].
Next row: (wrong side) * k3, p6, k3, (2nd row of cable pattern) in L; p22 in M; repeat from * to end.

Continue in stocking stitch and cable pattern, until work measures 5½ inches from beginning, finishing with right side facing for the next row.

Shape crown as follows:

Next row: * (k2tog, k7, k2tog tbl) twice in M; pattern 12 L; repeat from * to end. [150 sts].
Next row: * pattern 12 in L; P18 in M; repeat from * to end.
Next row: * (k2tog, k5, k2tog tbl) twice in M; pattern 12 L; repeat from * to end. [130 sts].
Next row: * pattern 12 in L; P14 in M; repeat from * to end.
Next row: * (k2tog, k3, k2tog tbl) twice in M; pattern 12 L; repeat from * to end. [110 sts].
Work 1 row.
Next row: * (k2tog, k1, k2tog tbl) twice in M; pattern 12 L; repeat from * to end. [90 sts].
Work 1 row.
Next row: * k3tog, k3tog tbl twice in M; pattern 12 L; repeat from * to end. [70 sts].
Break off M.

Next row: K3, * p6, k2, (p2tog) twice, k2; repeat from * to last 11sts; p6, k2, p3tog. [60 sts].
Next row: * p2tog, p1, pattern 6, p1, p2tog; repeat from * to end. [50 sts].
Next row: * p2tog, p6, p2tog; repeat from * to end. [40 sts].
Next row: * k2tog, k4, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [30 sts].
Next row: Purl.
Next row: * k2tog; repeat from * to end. [15 sts].

Break off wool leaving end. Thread end through remaining sts and draw up tightly. Fasten off securely.

Making up - Press lighty on the wrong side, using a warm iron and a damp cloth. Join seam, using a fine back stitch. Press seam.

Materials

Original pattern calls for 3oz of medium colour and 1oz light in an Aran weight yarn.
Example shown is knitted in 3 x 50g balls of a heavy vintage DK from Phildar.

One pair each of numbers 10 and 7 needles.

Tension

20st and 25 rows to 4 inches (10cm) on No 7 (4½mm) needles.

Size matters

Instructions to fit an "average" head (!).

A word on the wool.

I used Phildar yarns Oxygene (a DK) which knits 23st to 4 inches; and Frénésie (a heavy DK) which knits 19st to 4 inches.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

1970s and colour

Yet another object of my admiration is Southwest airlines. They don't really have any visibility outside the US, so I was suitably surprised on my first journey with them. (It was the night of October 31st flying to Tucson in 1994, and they sure had some fun with us passengers...). I have also been impressed at their impromptu organisation of party games to try and occupy a hot and fractious plane load of souls during an hours delay at LA. (See the wikipedia entry: "Southwest is known for colourful boarding announcements and crews that burst out in song. The singing is unusual, and is quite popular among customers, but has been noted by some travel critics as being offensive and intrusive." huh - what do they know?!)
They had their 25th anniversary in 1996, and had an exhibition that I must have caught somewhere (perhaps a magazine article) which showed their uniform designs over the years. Sadly I can't find any trace of this on the web now - just these photos:

sw-airlines-1970s.jpg orange200.jpg

© Christina Coutts 2007

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