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August 2016

Bags for Beach or Festivals

FestivalBagII.jpg

Summer season bags in crochet this time - for beach - or for festivals if you want the full seventies vibe. Easy to make using a single basic granny square motif.

Instructions.

The bags are made up by joining a number of the same basic "granny square" motif. If you are feeling adventurous you could make up your own version of the squares to approximately the same size or you could use a variety of colours (in the "granny square" tradition) to use up wool oddments.

Motif

With Gold (G) make 4 ch, join into ring with slip stitch (ss).

1st round: in G, 3 ch, 11 tr into ring. [12 sts]
2nd round: in Red (R), join with Ss to top of ch, (3 ch, 2 tr, 1 ch, 3 tr), all in next stitch, miss 2 stitches, * (3 tr, 1 ch, 3 tr,) all in next stitch, miss 2 stitches, repeat from * 3 times; join with Ss to top of ch
3rd round: in Cream (C), 3 ch, 2 tr, in space between last tr and ch of previous round, (3 tr, 1 ch, 3 tr) all in next ch sp, * 3 tr in SP between 2 groups, (3 tr, 1 ch, 3 tr) all in next ch SP, repeat from * 3 times; join with Ss to top of ch
Fasten off.


Handbag

Make 10 motifs.
Join motifs as follows: wrong sides to inside, place 2 motifs together.
With C, make loop round hook (as if starting a chain), insert hook through corner ch SP of each motif and draw loop through, then draw
loop through loop on hook (this fastens the yarn to the work). Insert hook through both loops of next stitch of each motif and draw loop through, (this joins the motifs together), and draw the loop through
loop on hook, (this completes the join - you are essentially slip stitching the motifs together).
Continue in this way, ending at ch SP at opposite corner.
Fasten off.

Join remaining motifs in the same way, thus having 5 strips made of 2 motifs each

Now make a square by joining 2 strips together using the slip stitch technique as before. Make another square the same.
You now have two squares made up of 4 motifs and one oblong made up of 2 motifs.

Handbag - main part

[Editor's note: In this section you make diagonal edgings for each side of the square sections of the bag. You end up with another square with the original 4 motifs set "on point" as you can see in the photo.]

With right side facing and Gold (G), join yarn to corner ch SP of one of the squares, and work along first side edge as follows :
1st row: in G, 3 ch, 2 tr in corner ch SP, (3 tr in SP between next 2 groups) twice, 3 tr in centre of joining row, (3 tr in SP between next 2 groups) twice, 3 tr in corner ch SP [7 groups].
Turn, 1 Ss in each of last 3 tr of previous row.

2nd row: in Red (R), 3 ch, 2 tr in 1st SP between first 2 groups, 3 tr in
each following SP [6 groups].
Turn, 1 Ss in each of last 3 tr of previous row.

3rd row: in Cream (C), as 2nd row [5 groups].

Alternating colours as before, work 4 more rows, thus ending 3 ch 2 tr in G worked in SP between 2 groups. [1 group].
Fasten off.

Joining yarn to corner ch SP already used, work along 2nd and 3rd sides of square in the same way, then work along 4th side starting
and ending with corner ch SP already used.

Work the other main part in the same way on the second 4-motif square.

Handbag - flap

[Editor's note: At this point you might think "flap" is an instruction - but it isn't - it' just the description of the piece you are making next. The instruction is "just keep calm and carry on". Crochet is always more difficult to read from a pattern than it is to actually do it.]

With right side facing and G, join yarn to corner ch SP at long side of remaining oblong strip and work as follows:

1st round: in G, 3 ch 2 tr in corner ch SP, (3 tr in SP between next 2 groups) twice; 3 tr in centre of joining row; (3 tr in SP between
next 2 groups) twice, 3 tr 1 ch 3 tr in next corner ch SP, (3 tr in SP between next 2 groups) twice, 3 tr 1 ch 3 tr in next corner ch SP Continue in this way all round strip, ending 3 tr 1 ch, in 1st corner ch SP again. Join with Ss to top of ch at the beginning of the round.
2nd round: in R, 3 ch 2 tr in corner ch SP, then - as you did in 1st round - 3 tr in each SP between 2 groups, 3 tr 1 ch 3 tr in each corner ch SP, ending 3 tr 1 ch in 1st corner ch SP again. Join with Ss to top
of ch at beginning of round.
3rd round: in C as 2nd round.
Fasten off.

Handbag - gusset

With G, make 10 ch

1st row: 1 tr in 4th ch from hook, 1 tr in each following ch
Turn with 3 ch.
2nd row: miss 1st stitch, 1 tr in each following stitch Turn with 3 ch
[ 8 stitches, including turning ch of previous row which counts as 1 tr].

Repeat 2nd row until strip measures 24 inches (61 cm).
Fasten off.

Handbag - to make up

Using a warm iron and damp cloth, press parts lightly on wrong side.
Cut lining as for 2 squares and gusset, allowing ½ inch (1 cm) extra all round for turnings.
Pin gusset round 3 sides of each square; sew in position by stitching tip of each group of main part to edges of gusset .
Sew flap to remaining side of 1 square.
Using G, work 1 row dc, along 3 free sides of flap, working 3 dc in each corner and making a 10 ch loop at each end of long side approximately 2 inches (5 cm) in from the edge - these are the button loops (see photo).

Make twisted cord from 18 strands of remaining yarn, each strand 100 inches (254 cm) long (or however long you want the shoulder strap to be), and attach to top of gusset at each side of bag.

Join lining and place inside bag with seams to inside, turn in raw edges at top and inside flap, and slip hem neatly in position.

Sew on buttons.


Beach bag

Make 55 motifs.
Joining motifs as for handbag, making 11 strips of 5 motifs each

Beach bag - back

Join 6 strips together, thus having an oblong.

Point: With right side facing and using G, join yarn to corner ch SP of oblong and work along 1 short edge as follows:

1st row: in G, 3 ch 2 tr in corner ch SP, * (3 tr in SP between next 2 groups) twice, 3 tr in centre of joining row; repeat from * ending 3 tr in corner ch SP [16 groups].
Turn, Ss in each of last 3 tr of previous row.
2nd row: in R, 3 ch 2 tr in SP, between first 2 groups, 3 tr in each following SP [15 groups].
Turn, Ss in each of last 3 tr of previous row.
3rd row: in C , as 2nd row [14 groups].

Alternating colours as before, work 13 more rows, thus ending 3 ch 2 tr in G, worked in SP between 2 groups. [1 group].
Fasten off.

Beach bag - flap

Working along opposite edge of oblong, work as for point.
In make a 10 ch loop into centre of last group (button loop).
Fasten off.

Beach bag - front

Join 5 strips together, thus making a square.
Work as for back, making one point for bottom of bag and omitting flap.

Beach bag - to make up

Press as for handbag.

Cut lining as for front and back, allowing ½ inch (1 cm) extra for turnings.
Place back and front together from points upwards, with wrong sides to inside. Using C, work joining row up one side, then work in
dc up side of extra motif of back.
Join second side in the same way.
Work 1 row dc along upper edge of front.
Fasten off.

Using a flat-stitch seam, join points by catching together tips of each group.

Make twisted cord as for handbag and attach to sides.
Line as for handbag.

Using 18 strands of remaining yarn, each strand 12 inches (30 cm) long, make tassel and attach to point.

Sew on button to match loop.

Materials

The yarn is an Aran or worsted weight in balls of 50g.

Handbag:
1 ball each in three colours: Cream, Lipstick Red, and Harvest Gold.
2 buttons.
½ yard lining fabric.

Beach bag:
4 in Cream, 3 in Lipstick Red and 2 in Harvest Gold.
1 buttons.
1 yard lining fabric.

One No 8 (4mm) crochet hook.

Tension

One motif measures approximately
2¾ x 2¾ inches,
(7cm x 7cm)

Size matters

Hand bag:
About 8 inches (20cm) square.

Beach bag:
About 14 inches (36cm) wide and 20 inches (51cm) high.

Crochet abbreviations:

ch: chain
dc: double crochet
tr: treble
Ss: slip stitch
SP: space

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

A Word on the Wool

The original yarn was Patons Capstan - an Aran weight yarn knitting to a tension of 18 sts to 4 inches. No clues as to the yardage but it was a fairly dense pure wool so I would not expect it to have a long yardage.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

August 2015

Festival Bag

FestivalBag2.jpg

Festival season is well under way so I am posting this a little early - too late for Glastonbury but in time for WOMAD if you are a fast knitter (or knit while you are there..!).and Cropredy.
You can use any stitch for the bag that appeals, taking the pattern as a basic shape. You could try a multicoloured honeycomb pattern, or you could combine stripes of different pattern textures. The simplest shape (on the left) is the type I remember with the tasselled handle continuing all down the sides.

Instructions.

Striped bag (left)

Using No 3 needles and main colour A, cast on 36 stitches.
The bag is worked entirely in garter stitch (every row knitted); begin by knitting 2 rows.
Now pick up your contrast colour B and * knit 2 rows with B, 2 rows with A, 2 rows with B, 6 rows with A, 2 rows with B, 4 rows with A, 2 rows with B.
Repeat from the point marked * * 5 times altogether.
Cast off all the stitches.

To make up the striped bag

If you want to line the bag, cut the lining to the size of the bag, allowing 6mm (½ inch) turnings.
With right sides of bag facing each other, join the side seams.
Join the lining side seams.
Insert the lining and stitch round the top opening of bag.

Cut 6 strands each of A and B into 178cm (70 inch) lengths. Divide the strands into 3 groups and plait together to form a handle, making an overhand knot at each end and leaving the ends to form a tassel.

Stitch the plait in position along the side seams of the bag, having a tassel at each lower edge and leaving the remainder to form the handle.

Sew on one button or bead to the centre of each side of the top edge of the bag.
Make a double figure of eight with yarn A, large enough to fasten over both buttons, and work round the figure with buttonhole stitch.

Shoulder bag (right)

To make this bag you can experiment any textured pattern.
The bag shown is made from a strip worked in bobble stitch

Cast on 62 stitches and start knitting in your chosen pattern.
[Editor's note: work out your tension with your chosen yarn in the pattern you are planning to use , and cast on enough stitches for the width of the bag that you want to make.]

Continue in pattern until the length is about 3 times the height you want the bag to be, allowing up to 2 inches additional for the bottom of the bag. The bag shown was knitted 76cm (30 inches) long.

For the strap, cast on 11 stitches and work 106cm (42") in single rib.

Finishing the shoulder bag

Sew together so that the strap makes a gusset at the sides of the bag. You can optionally line the bag and add a couple of buttons and loops as shown in the Picture.

Textured Pattern stitches

Bobble rib

Cast on a number of stitches divisible by 6 plus 2.
1st row (right side): P2, * K1, P2, repeat from * to end.
2nd row: K2, * P1, K2, repeat from * to end.
3rd row:. P2, * K1, P2, (P1, K1, P1, K1) all into next st, this is done without removing the stitch you are working into until the 4 stitches have been — called M4 — P2, repeat from * to end.
[Editor's note: try to make these stitches fairly loose.
4th row:. K2, * K6, P1, K2, repeat from * to end.
5th row: P2,* K1, P2, (P4 then turn both needles round as if you are starting a new row and knit these 4 sts, turn work round and P these 4 sts — called B4 —), P2, repeat from * to end.
6th row: K2, * bring yarn to front of work, and insert right hand needle through the next 4 sts on the left hand needle from right to left and purl these 4 sts tog—called P4tog — K2, P1, K2, repeat from * to end.
7th row: As 1st row.
8th row:
As 2nd row.
9th row:. P2, * M4, P2, K1, P2, repeat from * to end.
10th row:. K2, * P1, K8, repeat from * to end
11th row: P2, * B4, P2, K1, P2, repeat from * to end.
12th row:. K2,* P1, K2, P4tog, K2, repeat from * to end.
These 12 rows form the pattern.

Cane basket stitch

Cast on a number of sts divisible by 6 plus 2.

1st row (right side): K2, * P4, K2, repeat from * to end.
2nd row: P2, * K4, P2, repeat from * to end.
Rep 1st and 2nd rows once more.
5th row: P3, * K2, P4, repeat from * to last 5 sts; K2, P3.
6th row:. K3, * P2, K4, repeat from * to last 5 sts; P2, K3.
Rep 5th and 6th rows once more.
These 8 rows form the pattern.

Tassel stitch

Cast on a number of sts divisible by 6 plus 2.
1st row (right side): P2, * K4, P2, repeat from * to end.
2nd row: K2,* P4, K2, repeat from * to end.
Rep 1st and 2nd rows once more.
5th row: K2,* insert right hand needle from front to back between 4th and 5th sts on left hand needle, take yarn across back of sts and draw through a loose loop across front of 4 sts and leave on right hand needle, K1, P2, K3, repeat from * to end.
6th row: * P3, K2, bring yarn forward to front of work, insert right hand needle through next st and loop on left hand needle from right to left and purl these 2 sts together to decrease one st — called P2tog — repeat from * to last 2 sts, P2.
7th row: K3,* P2, K4, repeat from * to last 5 sts, P2, K3.
8th row: P3,* K2 P4, repeat from * to last 5 sts, K2, P3.
Rep 7th and 8th rows once more.
11th row: P2, K3, .* insert right hand needle from front to back between 4th and 5th sts on left hand needle, take yarn across back of sts and draw through a loose loop across front of 4 sts and leave on right hand needle, K1, P2, K3, repeat from * to last 3 sts, K1, P2.
12th row: K2, P4,* K2, P2tog, P3, repeat from * to last 2 sts, K2.
These 12 rows form the pattern.

You can find more textured stitches in these links:

A different basket stitch and blackberry stitch.

Honeycomb stitch in two colours

Materials

Striped Bag: 200gm (7oz) of uncut rug yarn in main shade A.
100gm (3½oz) in contrast colour B.
One pair No 3 (6½mm) needles.
Two wooden buttons or beads.
Optional lining: 30cm (12 inch) length of 90cm (36 inch) wide fabric.

Textured bag:
About 200gm (7 oz) of double knitting or worsted yarn.
One pair of No 8 (4mm) needles.
Optional lining fabric.

Tension

Striped bag:
About 12 sts to 4 inches

Textured bag:
22-26sts to 4 ins over pattern.

Size matters

Striped bag: 30cm (12 inches) by 25cm (10 inches)

Textured bag: About 25cm (10 inches) high by 23cm (9 inches) wide

Abbreviations

k2tog or p2tog: knit or purl 2 sts together (decrease one stitch).

A Word on the Wool

The suggested use of rug wool is good for bags though can be hard on the fingers. Rug yarns are fairly thick - a chunky or bulky yarn equivalent.

Always check the tension and you can make a bag of the exact dimensions you want.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

These types of bag were very popular in the 1970s - I used one instead of a school satchel. Probably the striped bag on the left above is the most stylistically similar to the ones I remember - I might choose different colours!
My own bag - now long lost - was woven in a mixture of dark red and blue. Below is a genuine "gap year" cloth bag from the 1970s which made its way backpacking to the far east and back. It is a mail bag style like the knitted version pictured on the right above.

FestivalBag3.jpg

Below is a detail from the picture. The bag is woven of course but you could reproduce this pattern in knitting and easily add lots of tassels.

FestivalBag3-detail.jpg

The main bag has the stripes running vertically, and the flap has them horizontal. If you want this effect, as it's not easy to knit vertical stripes while keeping the integrity of the fabric, you could use this chart as written for the flap, and then use it to knit the front and bag in one piece from side to side. If you were feeling really confident you could knit front and back (sideways rectangle) then pick up the stitches from the side of the knitting and knit the flap.
So - to do this - before you start - work out your tension and then how large you want the bag to be. Lets say that it's 12 inches high and 10 inches wide. You need to cast on enough stitches to make 24 inches in the width of your knitting. Then knit stocking stitch in pattern for 10 inches and cast off. At the side of the knitting, pick up stitches for the flap. Usually this means picking up 2 stitches for every 3 rows to make a flat fabric without puckering. Then knit in the pattern for up to 12 inches to cover the front of the bag - if you are adding tassels you might want to knit as little as 4-6 inches.

FestivalBag-chart.jpg

Finally I'll leave you to extemporise on the handle and tassels. You might want to knit a plain handle about 2 inches wide and back it with some kind of webbing - then you would use it as the sides of the bag as you can see our original was made. Or you could just fold the bag without sides and apply a plaited cord handle as for the first bag on the left in these instructions.

You would probably need to use a 4 ply / DK / worsted on a smaller than usual needle to give a solid fabric, and it would be a good idea to line it with something firm.

I'm sure you could also make a simple bag from two woven panels (three for a mail bag) - perhaps made using a fairly crude home-made loom. I am planning to experiment with this in the near future. Watch this space (!).

November 2013

Traditional Cosy Set

TraditionalCosySet.jpg

The archetypal cosy design (maybe with a few too many pom-poms for historical verisimilitude but who's counting?). And - no idea why the British are quite so obsessed with hats for their eggs, but it does seem that there is always a matching egg cosy* to complete the set.

* I think with very fine wool and a bit of adaptation these could become knitted hats for the Big Knit - a campaign from Innocent Smoothies, who are again putting knitted hats on their bottles this year in aid of Age UK (helping older folk face the winter). The advertising says "knit a hat this November" however unfortunately the deadline for knitting is past as the campaign aims to have the hats in place during November - so maybe next year....
However, you can still join in by designing your own virtual hat and sharing on Facebook (10p donation from Innocent), or by buying a smoothie with a hat (25p donation by Innocent), or with a direct donation. Have a look on their website - there are free mini-hat patterns!

Instructions

The pleats are formed by each colour being drawn up across the back of the colour just used and keeping all the strands to the wrong side of the work throughout.

Tea Cosy (make 2 pieces)

With No 8 needles and light colour (L), cast on 98sts and knit 5 rows.

Join in Dark colour (D) and proceed in pattern as follows:

1st row: k1L, k6D; * k7L, k7D; repeat from * to last 7 stitches, k6L, k1D.
[Editor's note: Remember you are pulling the unused colour across the back of the knitting to draw up the pleats as you work - this is the reverse of the effect you are usually trying to achieve when you strand colours across the back.]
2nd row: k1D, k6L; * k7D, k7L; repeat from * to last 7 stitches, k6D, k1L.
3rd-6th rows: Repeat 1st and 2nd rows twice.
7th row: k1D, k6L; * k7D, k7L; repeat from * to last 7 stitches, k6D, k1L.
8th row: k1L, k6D; * k7L, k7D; repeat from * to last 7 stitches, k6L, k1D.
9th-12th rows: Repeat 7th and 8th rows twice.

Repeat 1st and 2nd rows until work measures 6 inches from beginning finishing at the end of 2nd row.

Shape top as follows:
1st row: k2togL, k3D, k2togD, * k2togL, k3L, k2togL, k2togD, k3D, k2tog.D; repeat from * to last 7 stitches, k2togL, k3L, k2togD

2nd row: klD, k4L, * k5D, k5L; repeat from * to last 5 stitches, k4D, k1L.
3rd row: k2togL, k1D, k2togD, * k2togL, k1L, k2togL, k2tog.D, klD, k2togD; repeat from * to last 5 stitches, k2togL, k1L, k2togD.
4th row: klD, k2L, * k3D, k3L; repeat from * to last 3 stitches, k2D, k1L.
5th row: k2togL, k1D, * k2togL, k1L,k2tog.D, klD; repeat from * to last 3 stitches, k2togL, k1D.
6th row: klD, k1L, * k2D, k2L; repeat from * to last 2 stitches, k1D, k1L.
7th row: (k2togL) twice, * k2tog.D, k2togL; repeat from * to last 4 stitches, (k2togD) twice.

Break off wool, thread end of Light colour through the remaining stitches, draw up and fasten off securely.

Make another piece in same manner.

To Make Up the Tea Cosy

Stitch side and top seams leaving openings for handle and spout.
Using Light colour make make 3 pom-poms and attach to top of cosy. With 2 strands of Dark, crochet a chain and arrange loops on top of cosy as in photograph.


Egg Cosy (make 1 piece)

With No 10 needles and light colour (L) in 3 ply, cast on 72sts and knit 3 rows.

Join in Dark colour (D) and proceed in pattern as follows:

1st row: k1L, k5D; * k6L, k6D; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, k5L, k1D.
[Editor's note: Remember you are pulling the unused colour across the back of the knitting to draw up the pleats as you work - this is the reverse of the effect you are usually trying to achieve when you strand colours across the back.]
2nd row: k1D, k5L; * k6D, k6L; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, k5D, k1L.
3rd-4th rows: Repeat 1st and 2nd rows.
5th row: k1D, k56L; * k6D, k6L; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, k5D, k1L.
6th row: k1L, k5D; * k6L, k6D; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, k5L, k1D.
7th-8th rows: Repeat 5th and 6th rows.

Repeat 1st and 2nd rows until work measures 2¾ inches from beginning finishing at the end of 2nd row.

Shape top as follows:
1st row: k1L, k2togD, k3D, * k2togL, k4L, k2togD, k4D; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, k2togL, k3L, k1D

Work from to as on Tea Cosy.

To Make Up the Egg Cosy

Stitch side seam.
Using Light colour make a pom-pom and attach to top of cosy. With 2 strands of Dark, crochet a chain and arrange loops on top of cosy as in photograph.

Materials

Tea Cosy: 3oz light colour (L) and 2oz dark (D) Double Knitting Yarn

Egg Cosy: 1oz light colour (L) and 1oz dark (D) 3ply yarn

A pair of No 8 (4mm) needles for the tea cosy and No 10 (3¼mm) needles for the egg cosy plus crochet hook.

Tension

22sts x 30 rows to 4 ins for the tea cosy and
30sts x 38 rows to 4 ins for the egg cosy over stocking stitch.

Size matters

To fit "a large sized teapot".
[Editor's note: Egg cosy size not specified!]

Abbreviations

k2tog: decrease by knitting 2 sts together.

For information on making pom-poms
click here
to see a previous entry on this site.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

CherryCosy.jpg

June 2013

French Poodle

FrenchPoodle.jpg

How very 1950s! How very French!.
How could I resist?
At first glance I assumed this was the more usual toilet roll cover (because nobody wants their spare toilet rolls exposed to the world do they?) - but no! It is a "bottle" cover. How much better to have a knitted poodle gracing the dining table rather than leaving your Castle Lafite Rothschild labels tastelessly speaking for themselves. [Actually I think it looks like it's designed for the sherry bottle - perhaps to hide the little nip you need to get through the housework.]

Alternatively you can wimp out and knit it as a toy - provided your child is also into retro 1950s toys, (did I mention that as a kid my favourite toy was a poodle ? ... he wasn't knitted though ..... Pom Pom .... ‹closes eyes in reminiscence ›)

[Please note: This has not been knitted up to test the pattern but is provided as per the original. The shapes are very simple and the main effort is in the making up.]

Instructions.

The poodle is knitted mainly in garter stitch with some eyelet rows to carry elastic and drawstring. I think the two methods of assembly have not been quite thought through in the original pattern, so you need to use your common sense and refer to the picture when sewing it together.

Body

With No 8 needles cast on 49 stitches, and knit 2 rows.

Next row: * k1, wf, k2tog; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.

Continue in garter stitch (every row knit) until work measures 7½ inches from the beginning.

Next row: * k5, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [42 sts]
Knit 3 rows.

Next row: * k4, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [35 sts]
Knit 3 rows.

Next row: * k3, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [28 sts]
Knit 3 rows.

Next row: * k2, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [21 sts]
Knit 1 rows.

Next row: K1; * k2tog; repeat from * to end. [11 sts]

Thread wool through remaining stitches, draw up and fasten off securely. [Editor's note: I think there is a bit of an implied error here - this is the neck, so only draw up to the degree that the neck of the bottle will fit...]

Head

Cast on 49 stitches, and knit 3 rows.

Next row: * k5, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [42 sts]
Knit 3 rows.
Next row: * k4, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [35 sts]
Knit 3 rows.
Next row: * k3, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [28 sts]

Next row: * k1, wf, k2tog; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.

Continue without any shaping for 3 inches.

Next row: * k2tog; repeat from * to end. [14 sts]
Next row: Knit.
Next row: * k2tog; repeat from * to end. [7 sts]

Thread wool through remaining stitches, draw up and fasten off securely.

Nose

Cast on 12 stitches, and work 1½ inches in garter stitch.

Next row: * k1, k2tog; repeat from * to end. [8 sts]
Next row: Knit.
Next row: * k2tog; repeat from * to end. [4 sts]

Thread wool through remaining stitches, draw up and fasten off securely.

Pom-Poms

Make 8 pom-poms, 2½ inches in diameter.
Make 2 pom-poms, 1¾ inches in diameter.

Cut 2 pieces of cardboard the diameter of the finished pom-pom; cut a ½ inch diameter hole in the centre. Wind wool over the rings until the centre hole is filled. With a sharp pair of scissors, cut through the wool at the outer edge. With double wool, bind round the centre of the pom-pom between the two pieces of cardboard; tie a knot and fasten off securely. Remove the cardboard. Fluff out and trim.

To Make Up

Join back seam.
Thread elastic through the holes in the bottle cover base and join securely.
Sew one large pom-pom to the back seam at the bottom edge (tail), and sew 4 large pom-poms on the front to represent the legs.
Using small pieces of cotton wool, stuff the nose and sew securely to the front of the head, ½ inch from the holes.
[Editor's note: I think there is a bit of nose-sewing here that is not fully described; so extemporise.]
Embroider the mouth and sew on the 2 buttons to represent the eyes.
Sew a large pom-pom to each side of the face, and on on top of the head. Sew the 2 smaller pom-poms between these (see photo).

Take 4 strands of light coloured wool and thread through holes at neck and secure with a small knot. Tie in a bow.
[Editor's note: This seems to be pictured as being covered with a ribbon tied in a bow - so again I am guessing a little something missing where you need to extemporise. When you draw up the neck remember it has to be able to fit round the neck of the bottle. The head is not stuffed - it is tubular and filled by the neck of the bottle.]

To Make Up the Poodle as a Toy

Follow the instructions for the Bottle Cover.

[Editor's note: After this there are a few inconsistencies which you need to work out as you go.]

Assemble as the bottle cover.

Insert a circle of cardboard 3 inches in diameter into the bottom of the body.
[Editor's note: As far as I can tell, the cardboard will be exposed at the bottom of the toy; you might want to knit a piece of use fabric to cover it before putting in place.]

Make a roll of stuffing 13 inches long and insert this into the base firmly, leaving excess sticking out for the head to fit over.
Run a strong thread through the top edge of the body (neck) and pull up tightly around the excess stuffing, and tie off.

Fluff out the stuffing slightly and fit head over it; pull down and stitch over body.
[Editor's note: As far as I can tell, this excess stuffing sticking out of the neck is pushed up into the head, where the neck of the bottle would have been in the bottle-cover version.]

Materials

4 ozs. Bri-Nylon Double Knitting, plus a short length of contrast wool.

6 inches (15cm) of narrow elastic.

A pair each of No
8 (4mm) "Aero" needles.

2 buttons.

For the toy: cardboard for the base and toy stuffing.

Tension

No tension is given but a normal tension for standard DK on No 8 needles is 22sts x 30 rows to 4 inches over stocking stitch.

Size matters

No size is given but presumably it fits "a bottle".

Abbreviations

wf: "wool forward": make a stitch by bringing the wool to the front of the work and then passing the yarn over the needle when you make the next stitch.

k2tog: (decrease) knit 2 sts together.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.


How to make pom-poms.



This is a different method which I ran across while looking for the simple tutorial above. It's less relevent for making our Poodle maybe but good if you want to make a load of these for a scarf or a necklace (ok - bit dated perhaps - think of your own project!)

August 2012

String Bag

StringBag.jpg

A crochet "holdall" or "tote" made in dishcloth cotton (subsequently re-branded craft cotton). This one is lined and the craft cotton is soft and flexible. You could make it from a coarser type of jute, (I would use a larger hook), and leave it unlined, to use as a vegetable or market bag. I have also seen some excellent bags and bowls made from Herdwick yarn; these are crocheted very tightly to create a rigid fabric so the bags will keep their shape unsupported.

Instructions

The bag is made in one piece starting at the base, and the straps are then attached separately.

Bag

Start at the base and make 21 ch.
Work in rounds as follows:

1st round: Work 3 dc into 2nd ch from hook; 1 dc in each of next 18 ch; work 3 dc into last ch; then continue along other side of ch by working 1 dc in next 18 ch; join with slip stitch to first dc of round. [42 sts]
2nd round: (inc1, 1 dc, inc1, 18 dc) twice. [46 sts]
3rd round: (2 dc, work 3 dc in next dc 20 dc) twice. [50 sts]
4th round: (1 dc, inc1, 1 dc, inc1, 1 dc, inc1, 19 dc) twice. [56 sts]
5th round: (3 dc, inc1, 2 dc, inc1, 2 dc, inc1, 18 dc) twice. [62 sts]
6th round: (5 dc, inc1, 3 dc, inc1, 21 dc) twice. [66 sts]
7th round: (9 dc, inc1, 23 dc) twice. [68 sts]
8th round: (6 dc, inc1, 6 dc, inc 20 dc) twice. [72 sts]
Base is now complete.
Next round: Make ridge by working 1 dc into back loop only of every stitch

Increase round: (inc1, 8 dc) 8 times. [80 sts]

Work in ridge pattern as follows:-

1st round: Work 1 dc in each dc.
2nd round: as 1st round but working into back loops only.

Repeat last 2 rounds until work measures 11½ ins. from the the first ridge worked at completion of base.
Fasten off.

Straps (Make 2)

Make 49 ch and work in rows.

1st row: 1 dc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 dc in next 47 ch , I ch , turn.
2nd row:
Miss 1 dc, 1 dc in next 47 dc, 1 ch , turn.
3rd row: as second round
Fasten off.

To Make Up:

Cut piece of card to fit base.

Cut lining, 18 x 24 inches (this lines the depth of bag and allows for gathered top as well).

From remainder of material, cut two strips for lining handles, 15 x 2 inches, and for base, draw round the card shape on material and cut out about 1 in. away from pencil outline.

Cover one side of card with lining, folding over and sticking surplus material onto the other side.
Pin one longer edge of lining round covered side of base, then stitch in position.

Join the 2 side edges of lining to make a tube.

Top Finish: Fold over top edge of lining to wrong side to make 3½ inch hem, and stitch in position. ¼ inch down from top folded edge. make 2 rows of stitching, ½ inch apart, for draw-string. Open seam between the 2 rows and insert tape.
[Editor's note: This assumes you are going with the covered-in draw-up top, but this can be left off if you wish to make the bag as a shopper.]

Slip lining into bag and stitch into position by catching the 3½ inch hemline behind crochet (about ½ inch down from top of edge of crochet).

Catch lining to base.

Line handles and stitch on each side of bag.

Draw up tape and tie.

Materials

2 x 4oz. hanks Dishcloth Cotton.
No 6 (5mm) crochet hook.
Piece of stiff card for base.
½ yard 36-inch wide glazed cotton for lining.
1 yard white tape for draw-string.
[Editor's note: This gives the bag a covered draw-up top, but this can be left off if you wish to make the bag as a shopper.]

Crochet abbreviations:

ch: = chain
dc: = double crochet
inc1: increase by working 2dc into 1dc

[Editor's note: Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.]

Tension

3 stitches to 1 inch in width.

Size matters

Depth: 11½ inches; Oval base: 9½ x 4½ inches.

A Word on the Wool

There are a number of brands sold as "dishcloth cotton" or "craft cotton" but it's a little pot luck with the thickness - you will have to experiment with the tension and how you want the bag to look. You are looking for an Aran weight yarn with a yardage of about 75m to 50g.

Lion Brand Cotton is fairly common in the US and would be suitable if you can obtain it (and comes in exciting colours too...).

You can literally use balls of string for this kind of bag but I've always found that works out surprisingly expensive.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

January 2012

Isobel's Little Blanket

IsobelsBlanket.jpg

This is small blanket or cot cover made from 12 crochet squares in chunky yarn (so quick to make). It's based the usual granny-square principle, but a very pretty example of it incorporating the central flower motif.

Instructions

There are a couple of new stitches used in this pattern, as well as basic chain, dc, and treble. There is a "cluster" used in making the central flower, and crab stitch for the edging.

Make cluster:

Working all into the same stitch, **yoh, draw through loop **; repeat from ** to ** 4 times (9 loops on hook); yoh, draw loop through all loops on hook; yoh, draw loop through stitch on hook.
[Editor's note: This last stitch is just "1 chain".]

Crab Stitch

Crab stitch is worked exactly as you do double crochet - but from right to left instead of left to right. It seems very awkward but just force yourself to do it; push the hook through the stitch to the right of your needle, pull through a loop, then yoh and pull through both loops on hook.

It creates a very attractive twisted ribbed edge.

There a is you tube extract inserted at end of this item - or go search the web for "crab stitch" for a variety of explanations.

Motif (make 12)

Starting at the centre of the square: using 7mm hook and first contrast, (plum), make 6ch and join in a ring using a slip stitch.

1st round: 8dc into the ring and join with a slip stitch to top of first dc.
2nd round: **1 cluster in first dc, 3ch; 1 cluster in next dc, 1ch **; repeat from ** to ** 3 times more, and join with a slip stitch to top of first st.
Change to second contrast (cream).
3rd round: Insert hook in first 3-chain space and make 2 chain for first treble; **2tr in same space, 3ch; 3tr in same space, 1ch; 3tr in next 1-chain space, 1ch; 1tr in next 3-chain space, ** repeat from ** to ** 3 times more, omitting the very last tr in the repeated sequence, and join with a slip stitch to top of first chains.
Change to third contrast (lime).
4th round: 1 dc **1dc over each of next 3tr, 3dc into next 3-chain space; 1dc over each of next 3tr, 1dc into next 1-chain space; 1dc over each of next 3tr, 1dc into next 1-chain space;**. Repeat from ** to ** 3 times more, and join with a slip stitch to top of first dc.

Fasten off.

This completes the motif.

IsobelsBlanket_detail.jpg

To Make Up

Make 12 squares altogether.

With 7mm hook and 3rd contrast (lime), join 2 squares together; hold right sides together and slip stitch through the back loop of each dc, leaving the front loops exposed as a decorative ridge on the right side (see photos).
[Editor's note: If you can't immediately see what is meant here, try experimenting. There is a loop on each side of a crochet stitch; usually when placing a stitch on top on the next row, you push your hook through both loops, but for some decorative sts, you are asked to use either only the back or only the front loops in order to create a ridge, Whatever you end up doing, just make sure you are consistent, so that you get a nice consistent pattern emerging.]

Join 3 squares in a row, then join the 4 rows together.

Finally, using first contrast (plum) and right side facing, work a row of dc all around the blanket, and work 2 or 3sts into the 4 corner sts, to make it curve properly. Then, keeping the right side facing you, change to a 6mm hook and go back the way you came, working one row of crab stitch right to left.

Sew in all ends.

Block the blanket by pinning it out and dampening; leave to dry. You can press very lightly with a damp cloth - just hold the iron above the cloth so it heats it but do not press down. You want to leave the texture of the stitches in place, so do not press heavily.

Materials

2 x 50g balls of chunky in each of first and second contrast and 1 ball in third contrast.


One No 2 (7mm) and one No 4 (6mm) crochet hook.

Tension

Each square is intended to measure 4¾ inches.

Size matters

To fit cot, pram, or Moses basket.

Abbreviations

yoh: yarn over hook.
ch: chain.
cl: cluster.
dc: double crochet.
tr: treble crochet.
[Editor's note: Remember this is English crochet where dc is equivalent to US single crochet, and tr is equivalent to US double crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.]

A word on the wool.

The original yarn produces a tension of 13sts x 19 rows to 4 ins over stocking stitch. You can substitute an Aran weight yarn worked double throughout, though this is less easy to work with for crochet patterns.

I used Patons Pompero a chunky yarn, knitting to a tension of 16sts x 22 rows to 4 ins, which is thinner, though I used a 7mm hook with it.

Result of my yarn choice is a smaller blanket, requiring only one ball in each colour.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

Crab Stitch

Here is a You Tube item showing how to do crab stitch,
(a picture painting a thousand words and so on).

August 2011

Buckets of Pegs

PegBag1.jpg

My peg bag finally wore out. It's such a good design that I had a fun time reconstructing the bag using knitting and fabric. You could easily just use a quilted fabric, and while looking on the web I found lots of lovely ideas to make other bag designs. Try this one, or this "clothes-pin bag" which has a tutorial and pattern here - I think it needs a carabiner instead of the loop! (see more below...)

Instructions

With No 7 needles, cast on 107 stitches (more if felting), and work 4 rows in reverse stocking stitch starting with a purl row.

With right side facing, commence pattern as follows:

1st row: (P3, K5) to end
2nd row: (P3, K5) to end
3rd row: (P3, K5) to end
4th row: P4, K3, (P5, K3) to end
5th row: K4, P3, (K5, P3) to end
6th row: P4, K3, (P5, K3) to end

These six rows form the pattern; repeat for desired length of about 13-14 inches (more if felting).

Cast off.
[Editor's note: If you want to graft the bottom edges together then knit to the centre of the row and cut the yarn leaving a long tail. Fold the knitting in half lengthways so the two needles are side by side and graft the stitches together, forming the bottom of the bag.]

Making up

Fold the bag in half lengthways and sew together the cast off edge (if you did not graft the edge) to form the bottom edge of the bag.

Now prepare the support for the top edge which helps hold the neck of the bag open. Glue or overstitch the supporting paper rope to the length of cotton tape, centring it along the length of the tape. This does not need to be very firm, it just holds it in place while you insert it in the casing. Note that glue may help keep the rope stiffer without being too rigid.

Before sewing the side seam, fold the top edge of reverse stocking stitch over to form a casing. This is to hold the supporting rope/tape that you just created. You may need to fold it over with your supporting stiff rope already inside - arrange so that the rope is in the centre of the casing and the tape emerges at each end. There should be about 2 inches at each end of the casing that is unsupported by the rope.

Here is a picture showing the tape inside the casing. The lining is already in place although I describe making the lining differently here, in a separate step, below.
Both side seams (lining and bag) are left open.

Sew up the side seam, and attach the tape ends together (tie them) so that the neck of the bag will not stretch too much when in use. Cut the ties neatly to about 1 inch - they will be hidden when you sew in the lining.

Construct the lining:

Cut the lining fabric in one or two pieces, and sew up into a bag with one of the shorter edges left open. The bag need to be about 11 inches by about 15 inches when finished so cut out your pieces allowing for the seams.

Insert the lining into the knitted bag with wrong sides together; turn over the a hem at the top edge and sew into place around the knitted casing on the inside.

Attach the lining to the knitting at the bottom corners, (a couple of invisible stitches using sewing cotton).

Construct the hanger:

Using the strong wire from a coat hanger, make the shape you need for the peg bag using rounded pliers. Make open hooks at each end. This photo shows the shape you are aiming at:

Insert metal eyelets into the top of the bag equally either side of the bag's side seam, matching the position of your constructed wire hanger hooks.

Put the hanger-hook ends through the eyelets and pinch together.

Try out the bag.

If you don't want to make a hanger:

I was reconstructing an old bag, so I already had the hanger. If you don't feel up to messing about with heavy wire and pliers to make your own, you can make a tab on the back of the peg bag and attach an inexpensive carabiner (clip type not locking version) - large ones are fairly easily available on Amazon or eBay. Look at the Brabantia design for inspiration.

If you use a carabiner then you should probably use paper rope (22inches) through the entire length of the casing, not leaving any of the top of the bag unsupported.

Materials

3 x 50g balls chunky yarn to required tension.

One pair of number 7 (4½mm) needles.

Wire or wire coat hanger to make peg- bag hanger (or carabiner).

About 18 inches of paper rope for support.

1 metre or yard of cotton tape.

Half a metre (or half a yard) of cotton fabric for lining.

Tension

20sts x 28 rows to 4 inches (10cm) on 4½mm needles over basket-weave pattern.

Chunky yarn used is quoted as 14sts x 19 rows to 4 inches using 6mm needles.

Size matters

Bag is approximately 14inches by 11inches wide, when sewn into shape.

A word on the wool.

I used Sirdar Peru (now discontinued) for this project.

I used a floral quilting fabric for the lining; I always think linings are fun in bright wild prints.

Paper Rope

This is a very useful material used by prop makers as a stiffener or support. It is flexible but holds its shape. I had some difficulty finding it on the web in anything other than industrial quantities.

Flints Theatrical Chandlers appear to sell it by the metre, and there seems to be some available at a site devoted to making toys for parrots...


Felting

I used smaller needles to create as denser knitted fabric as I could without too much strain on my fingers. I would have preferred a stiffer felted fabric for the bag, but I tested Sirdar Peru previously and it does not felt well (too much synthetic content).

If you do want to felt the bag then from the given tension and needles, work out how many stitches to cast on with your chosen yarn to make a width of 22 inches and work out how many rows to knit for 14 inches. Then increase the stitches and rows according to the shrinkage factor of 85% in width and 75% in length.
[Editor's note: This shrinkage factor is a general estimate - if you want to know for sure, then knit a swatch and measure it before and after machine wash for felting. Substitue your own factors in the calculations.]

Here is an example with a standard double knitting wool:

Quoted tension is 22sts to 4 inches: -

    22 inches wide = 22sts ÷ 4 × 22 ins = 121sts
    Then increase by felting factor:-
    121sts ÷ 85% × 100% = 142sts (discard decimal)

To work the basket stitch as written, you need your stitches to be divisible by 8 plus 3. So calculate how many:-

    142sts ÷ 8 = 17 (discard decimal), then,
    8 × 17 + 3 = 139.

So cast on 139 sts and knit for 14 inches finished length after shrinkage of 75%, which is:-

    14ins ÷ 75% × 100% = about 18½ inches.

If you do make a felted bag and have some fabulous coloured wools - or you decide to knit a "bag of many colours" with left over Noro - or... anything that inspires you, then you may find you don't need the patterning for texture and just want to go with stocking stitch.
So in the above example you could cast on 142sts and knit for about 18½ inches.

Just make sure your yarn will felt before you start.

PegBag1.jpg

June 2011

Cherry Ripe

CherryCosy.jpg

A jolly tea cosy to get you in the mood for the real cherry season.
I used brown for the main colour (more practical potential tea-stain colour for my partially sighted Aunt), and I used green for the stems and also crocheted the leaves. I did find making the little crochet bobbles slightly tedious and fiddly but they look so wonderful when you step back and admire the finished cosy.

Instructions

This cosy is made as 2 flat pieces which are then sewn together to make the hat-like shape. Although I prefer to avoid seaming wherever possible, this is perfect for a cosy as you can tailor the openings to fit your specific teapot. (I never realised this could be an issue until I made a cosy which did not fit my 1930s pot as the spout was set very high). The fancy rib fits snugly around most average pot sizes, making this an excellent design.

Main Cosy (make 2 pieces)


With No 8 needles and main colour M, cast on 47sts and work in pattern as follows:

1st row: k3, * p2, k2; repeat from * to end.
2nd row: k1, * p2, k2; repeat from * to last 2 stitches, p1, k1.

These 2 to rows form the pattern..
Continue in pattern until work measures 5ins ending with a 2nd row.


Shape top as follows:-
1st row: * k2tog, k1, p1; repeat from * to last 3 stitches, k2tog, k1. [35 sts].
2nd row: k1, * p1, k2; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.
3rd row: k2, * p1, k2; repeat from * to end.
4th row: as 2nd row
5th row: * k1, p2tog; repeat from * to last 2sts, k2. [24sts]
6th - 8th rows: * k1, p1; repeat from * to last 2sts, k2.
9th row: k1, * k2tog; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.[13sts]
10th row: k1, purl to the last stitch, k1.
11th row: (k2tog) 6 times, k1. [7sts]

Break yarn and leave is on a spare needle or stitch holder.

Work another piece from to

Break yarn, leaving an end. Thread end through stitches on needle and 7sts from other piece left on holder; draw up tightly and fasten securely.

Cherries (make 12 in all)

With No. 8 crochet hook and red yarn (R), make 4 chain and join in a ring with a slip stitch.

1st round: 8dc into ring.
2nd round: 2 dc into each dc of previous round. [16sts]
3rd and 4th rounds: 1dc into each dc of previous round.
5th round: dec1, 8 times [8sts]

Fasten off.
Make 7 more in red (R) and 4 more in wine (W).

Stems

With No. 8 crochet hook and brown yarn (B), make 24 chain.
Fasten off.
Make 5 more stems the same.

To Make Up

Join sides of cosy together leaving an opening at each side for handle and spout.
Using same coloured yarn as cherries make small balls (for stuffing) and place inside each cherry.
Sew end of one stem to top of small ball in one cherry and other end to top of small ball in another cherry.
Draw up top of cherries and fasten securely.
Cut 4 felt leaves as illustrated.
Arrange cherries and leaves round top of cosy as in photograph and sew firmly in position.

Materials

1 x 50g ball double knitting yarn each in main cream colour (M), red (R), and wine (W) plus an oddment of brown (B).

A pair of No 8 (4mm) needles, and a No 8 (4mm) crochet hook.

Green felt for the leaves, or green yarn to crochet leaves.

Tension

24sts x 34 rows to 4 ins over pattern.

Size matters

Width all round: 16ins, (41cm); height: 6ins (15cm).

Abbreviations

dec 1: crochet decrease one:- (insert hook in next st and draw loop through) twice, yarn round hook and draw through 3 loops on hook.

dc: double crochet.
[Editor's note: Remember this is English double crochet where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.]

A word on the wool.

Any standard double knit is suitable, knitting to a tension 22sts x 30rows to 4 ins over stocking stitch.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

CherryCosy.jpg

October 2010

Time for Change (... or "Fall Back")

AranClock.jpg

Here is my second autumn version of the quirky clock, which I have refurbished in a similar way to that which I did in the spring. For the method used to disassemble and reassemble the clock - please see the "Spring Forward" entry for March 2010.
Read all those instructions first, then use the pattern here for the clock face.

Making the clock

As before it is important to remember that if you make a thicker clock face, it may interfere with the proper function of the clock hands. This pattern is for my original visualisation of a lovely thick Aran clock, but to achieve this I had to replace the clock mechanism in the IKEA clock with one with a higher loft. The clock face is thick all over not just towards the edges, so trimming the hands is not sufficient. If you do change the mechanism like this then you have to carefully check how high you can make the hands above the clock face while still being able to fit the plastic cover over the face.
[Editor's note: Failing all else you could leave the cover off altogether, exposing your knitted clock face to the elements.]

Materials

Clock movements and hands were purchased from A A Plastics. I tried both the 15mm and the 20mm shaft sizes, and settled on the latter.

Original clock came from IKEA.

Aran yarn was two different makes of left-overs - one for the face section and one for the edging section. Take care to match the shades of cream - there is a lot of variation in tone as well as thickness. The latter is less important for this project, just make sure you don't change yarn in the middle of one of the sections.

The clock face

Using 3¾mm needles and waste yarn, cast on 24 stitches, then, leaving a 6 inch tail, start using the cream aran yarn, and knit one row. Join in a circle and begin pattern as follows:

Row 1: (Twist 2; p1) 8 times. [Twist 2 by knitting through the second stitch on the left hand needle and then knitting through the first stitch and slipping both stitches off the needle together - effectively you have cabled over 2 stitches].
Row 2: (K2; p1) 8 times.
Row 3: (K1, increase knitwise by picking up the loop before the next stitch and knitting into the back of it, k1; p1) 8 times. [32sts]
Row 4: (K3; p1) 8 times.
Row 5: (K3; increase purlwise by picking up the loop before the next stitch and purling into the back of it, p1, increase purlwise). [48sts]
Row 6: (K3, p3) 8 times.
Row 7: (Cable and increase by slipping one stitch onto a cable needle and leaving at back of work, k2, increase knitwise using the loop before the stitch on the cable needle, knit one stitch from cable needle; p3, increase purlwise) 8 times. [64sts]
Row 8: (K4; p4) 8 times.
Row 9: (K4; increase purlwise, p4, increase purlwise) 8 times. [80sts]
Row 10: (K4, p6) 8 times.
Row 11: (K4; increase purlwise, p6, increase purlwise) 8 times. [96sts]
Row 12: (K4, p8) 8 times.
Row 13: (Cable and increase by slipping 2 sts onto a cable needle and leaving at back of work, k2, increase knitwise using the loop before the stitches on the cable needle, knit 2 sts from cable needle; p8) 8 times. [104sts]
Row 14: (K5; increase purlwise, p8, increase purlwise) 8 times. [120sts]
Row 15: (K5, p10) 8 times.
Row 16: (K5, increase purlwise, p4, make bobble, p5; k5, increase purlwise, p10) 4 times. [128sts]
To make bobble: increase by (k1, p1, k1, p1, k1) into next stitch; turn the work and knit the 5 sts; turn the work, slip 4 sts, k1, pass the 4 slipped sts over.
Row 17: (K5, p11) 8 times.
Row 18: (K5, p11, increase purlwise) 8 times. [136sts]
Row 19: (Cable and increase by slipping 2sts onto a cable needle and leaving at back of work, k3, increase knitwise using the loop before the stitch on the cable needle, knit 2 sts from cable needle; p12) 8 times. [144sts]
Row 20: (K6, p12) 8 times.
Row 21(cast off): (K2tog; k2tog, pass first stitch on right hand needle over second st, k2tog, pass first stitch on right hand needle over second st; cast off next 12 sts purlwise); repeat across all 8 sections and fasten off.

Return to the centre. Carefully remove the waste yarn and pick up the free stitches.
Thread the tail through the stitches and pull up. Fasten off.

The face is not quite flat making the effect of the cables and bobbles more overt. Sew in the ends and press lightly with a damp cloth, taking care not to flatten the cables.

Using the plastic clock face cover as a guide, cut a circle from stiff cardboard. and make a hole in the centre. Sew the knitted face to the cardboard at the edge, which pulls it into shape.

Put the clock face into the body, keeping the bobbles at the 12, 3, 6 and 9 positions.

Remove original plastic mechanism (it is held in place at the back by plastic clips which are easily released) and push in the new mechanism; secure in place with the washer and small ring bolt. I had to trim a plastic loop from the back of my replacement mechanism to make it fit the housing in the IKEA clock.


Knitted frame for the clock

The clock frame consists of 12 ribbed cables each with a centre bobble. It is designed to fit tightly, (so slightly stretched), aided by keeping the edge stitches in garter stitch.
I cast on with waste yarn and then grafted the stitches together - this is quite tricky, so you may want to finish by simply sewing the ends together.
Note that the right side rows always start with a slipped stitch, and the alternate rows do not. This makes the right hand edge of the work slightly tighter.

Cable abbreviations:

C3Lk = cable 3 to the left and knit: slip 3 sts on cable needle and leave at front of work; k1, then k1, p1, k1 from cable needle.
C3Rp = cable 3 to the right and purl: slip 1 st on cable needle and leave at back of work; k1, p1, k1, then purl one stitch from cable needle.
C3Lp = cable 3 to the left and purl: slip 3 sts on cable needle and leave at front of work; p1, then k1, p1, k1 from cable needle.
C3Rk = cable 3 to the right and knit: slip 1 st on cable needle and leave at back of work; k1, p1, k1, then knit one stitch from cable needle.

C7 = cable over 7 stitches: slip next 4 sts on to a cable needle and leave at the back of the work; k1, p1, k1, then p1, k1, p1, k1, from cable needle.

Make bobble: increase 4 sts by (k1, p1, k1, p1, k1) into next stitch; turn the work and knit the 5 sts; turn the workand decrease the 4 sts just made by slipping 4 sts, k1, then pass the 4 slipped sts over.

Pattern:

Using 3¾mm needles, cast on 15 sts and begin the 16 row pattern:

Row 1: Slip1, k1; k1, p1, k1; p5; k1, p1, k1; k2
Row 2 (and alternate rows): Knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches.
Row 3: Slip1, k1; C3Lk; p3; C3Rk; k2
Row 5: Slip1, k2; k1, p1, k1; p3; k1, p1, k1; k3
Row 7: Slip1, k2; C3Lk; p1; C3Rk; k3
Row 9: Slip1, k3; C7; k4
Row 11: Slip1, k2; C3Rp; p1; C3Lp; k3
Row 13: Slip1, k2; k1, p1, k1; p3; k1, p1, k1; k3
Row 15: Slip1, k1; C3Rp; p3; C3Lp; k2
Row 17: Slip1, k1; k1, p1, k1; p2, make bobble, p2; k1, p1, k1; k2
Row 18: K2; p1, k1, p1; k5; p1, k1, p1; k2

Repeat rows 3-18 eleven times more. Cast off.
Join in a ring, either sewing or grafting.

Attach the knitted circle to the clock with the slipped stitch edge towards the clock face, and attach the other side to the rim of the clock; I drilled holes around the plastic clock surround, (as before), about ¼ inch from the edge.


August 2010

Autumn Afghan

AutumnAfghan.jpg

I love the rich autumn colours in this simple 1970s throw. Don't spurn the simple crochet motif; while not technically challenging, they do make an ideal handbag project for your holiday or your commute to work. You may think it's a bit early to think about autumn but there are just under 200 motifs make up the full size blanket... so maybe in time for Autumn 2011!

Crochet abbreviations:

ss = slip stitch
ch = chain
dc =double crochet
tr = treble crochet
2 tr tog = two treble together - as follows:
Yarn round hook (yrh), insert hook in space and draw through a loop as you would for a normal treble - you have 3 loops on the hook;
yrh and draw through 2 loops continuing as for a normal treble - you have 2 loops on the hook.
Now it becomes a little different. You leave the 2 loops - do not finish the stitch but start a second treble: yrh, insert hook in next space and draw through a loop - you have 4 loops on the hook; yrh and draw through 2 loops - you have 3 loops on the hook; finish the stitch by yrh and draw through remaining 3 loops.
[Editor's note: This is a method of "decreasing" in crochet although that's not why we are doing it in this motif.]

Remember the above are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Editor's note: While writing this I found a simply excellent free form crochet site from James Walters which reflects his own work alongside Sylvia Cosh and has - among other things - some great crochet information. As the author states - the information was originally intended as worksheets for their students - however I found they do offer useful guidance (available in both what I will call "English" as well as "US English"!)

Instructions

Make 4 ch and join with a ss to make a ring.

1st round: 3ch; 11 tr into ring; ss to 3 ch.

2nd round: 3ch; 1 tr into same place as ss; * 2ch, 2tr into next tr, repeat from * to end, finishing with: 2ch, ss to 3rd of 3ch.

3rd round: 3ch; 2tr into first 2ch space; * 2ch, 1tr into same space, work 2 tr tog (see abbreviations) with first leg in the same space and second leg in the next space, 1tr into same space, repeat from * to end, finishing with: 2ch 1tr into same space, ss to 3rd of 3ch.
[Editor's note: I found this a bit confusing. see if this helps you: in one individual space, you start with the 2nd leg of a "2 tr tog" followed by 1 tr, 2ch, 1 tr, then the 1st leg of a "2 tr tog" - the 2nd leg moves you into the next space.]

4th round: * 1ch, 5tr in space, 1ch, 1dc into 2 tr tog, repeat from * to end, finishing with ss into ss of previous round.

Fasten off.

This completes your first motif.

Make 7 for the centre and then 48, 44, 44, and 46 in the other colours.

Here's a close-up picture of one of the motifs. Hopefully it will help you see how they should look.

Motif.jpg

Making up

Join 2 shells to each adjacent motif, using the following pattern as a guide to placement. It is a good idea to sew this together gradually as you go along - you can stop any time you feel it's big enough, leave the throw as a circular shape, or continue with the pattern to make a rectangle.

Sew in all ends.
Press lightly on the wrong side with a warm iron and a damp cloth.

Materials

4ply/Fingering yarn in 5 autumnal colours. You will need about 1 ball for the centre and about 8 balls for each of the other 4 colours.

One number 11 (3mm) crochet hook.

Tension

One motif measures about 4 inches in diameter.

Size matters

Approximately 52 by 60 inches.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

 

March 2010

Time for Change (... or "Spring Forward")

PinkClock.jpg

The clocks changed for British Summer Time last night - so here's a Spring clock!

Last summer our kitchen clock stopped working - not simply the battery this time. I took the cheap plastic mechanism to pieces - which was very interesting for me, and very irritating for George - but my only conclusion was that it was broken. I discovered I could get a relatively inexpensive replacement module from a local electronics chain store.
At some point along the way, I had the idea to make a knitted clock face - not sure where it came from - but here are my ideas in case you too want to create this somewhat over-the-top quirky original.

Making the clock

If you want to make the whole body of the clock yourself from scratch then you can buy the mechanism and hands from Maplins (or elsewhere I suspect) either online or from one of their shops for about £5. However, having done this to refurbish my old clock, I found that IKEA sell the entire clock (including mechanism and hands) for under £2.
In the end I made a couple of these clocks - using my old IKEA clock and a new one. Here is what I did.

The clock face

First of all - it is very important that the clock face that you knit is not too thick - if it is then it will stop the hands going round. This is because we are using a supplied module where the height of the hands above the clock face is pre-defined. I have not thought of any clever way of increasing the height, so - make sure your knitting is as fine as possible. The hour hand is the one closest to the clock face, and it is also the shortest - so you can cope better with increased texture towards the rim of the clock, for example, to create the markers for the hours, which could be, for example, buttons, knitted bobbles, or embellishments such as rhinestones or silk roses.
[Editor's note: I actually trimmed the minutes and second hands as they were not high enough to pass over the silk rose embellishments.]

The clock face is knitted from the pattern for the smaller table mat (the pattern for the mats is given in its entirety below).

I stopped after row 47 of the smaller mat and continued working each section of the mat with short rows before casting off - this helped make the face rounder, minimising the pointed edges:
48th round: * P23; turn the work and work back: sl1, k22; turn the work again: slip the first stitch and pass the last stitch from the previous set on the right hand needle over the first stitch; continue loosely casting off the next 22sts purlwise; sl1, k1, psso; repeat from * to end.
Fasten off.

However, once I had finished, I found the whole thing was very slightly too big. So in the end I had to adapt it to make it even smaller, because I did not want to change to a finer yarn.


Carefully take the clock to pieces. The following relates specifically to the clocks I used.

The plastic front cover is secured to the outer rim by moulded plastic clips which should be released at the back - I managed to release them easily enough using my thumbnail. I then pushed the front face further upwards from the back using a small screwdriver or steel knitting needle - push at each clip in turn a few millimetres at a time until the front face comes free.
Remove the 3 hands by simply pulling (gently) away from the central shank attached to the mechanism. Note that shank is made up of concentric rings, with each hand attached to a different size of ring. The hour hand is the lowest, and sits on the largest ring.
Next, remove the clock face. In these budget clocks the face is simply robust paper, and I managed to peel the paper away from the securing sticky tape without damaging it. I turned the paper over to make a plain clock face, and glued my knitted face to it using tacky glue, and left it under weights to dry overnight.
[Editor's note: If you want to embroider the hour markers, then do so before you attach the backing.]

PinkClock-dismantled.jpg

Add any non-knitted embellishments to mark the hours, and reassemble the clock.
Push the clock face well down on the clock mechanism - add glue in the centre if necessary.
Make sure the hour markers are correctly oriented with respect to the way the clock will hang on the wall (ie 12 at the top!). Hour first, minutes next and finally the second hand. Point all the hands to 12 to start with.
[Editor's note: If you want you can paint the hands to match your colour scheme. I would leave the hour and minute hands in black (or white) as they need to be a sharp contrast to the face colour. I thought it might be fun to paint glue on the hands and dip in sparkles for my pink clock. Whatever you decide, do not add anything that will make the hands too heavy, otherwise it will disrupt the function of the clock mechanism.]
Push the plastic cover back into place, allowing the plastic clips to click into position.

Now you are ready to embellish the surrounding frame of your clock. Here is an opportunity for your own imagination - I knitted a fancy strip, which I tried to glue it (slightly stretched) around the rim edge with tacky glue, holding the surround in place with clothes pegs until the glue dried. However this did not work well and I ended by drilling tiny holes around the back edge of the plastic surround and securing the edge by sewing through them.

PinkClock-detail.jpg


Knitted frame for the clock

This is a simple knitted strip, using a technique I learned at a workshop with Fi Morris.
It is garter stitch, so the strip is fairly stretchy; it can snuggly form itself around a curved surface, and it has an elegant wavy edge to suit a round "romantic" styled clock.

Cast on 12 sts and knit 2 rows, then begin the short row pattern:

Row 1: K10; wrap the next stitch by bringing the yarn to the front of the work, slip the next stitch on to the right hand needle, take the yarn to the back of the work, slip the stitch back on to the left hand needle; turn the work.
Row 2 (and alternate rows): Knit to end of row.
Row 3: K9; wrap the next stitch; turn the work.
Row 5: K8; wrap the next stitch; turn the work.
Row 7: K7; wrap the next stitch; turn the work.
Row 9: K6; wrap the next stitch; turn the work.
Row 11: K5; wrap the next stitch; turn the work.
Row 13: K4; wrap the next stitch; turn the work.
Row 15: K3; wrap the next stitch; turn the work.
Row 17: K2; wrap the next stitch; turn the work.
Row 19: K1; wrap the next stitch; turn the work.
Row 20: Knit to end of row (that is knit 1 stitch).

Then knit across all 12 sts for 3 rows.
[Editor's note: The slipped stitches are elongated when knitted, and form part of the pattern.]

Repeat these 23 rows until the strip is as long as you need.

My clock was about 30 inches round and I did 40 repeats in 4ply yarn using 2½mm needles to fit around it. I cast on with waste yarn and grafted the sts together to make a ring before stretching it over the clock and glueing in place.


1950s Table Mats

Instructions

To make the pink clock face I worked the smaller mat using a vintage 4ply synthetic yarn. These are the full instructions for the table mats here (in case you want to make table mats).

Large place mat

Cast on 8 sts, (2 sts on one needle and 3 sts on each of 2 needles), and join in a round.

1st and 2nd round: Knit.
3rd round: * Yfd, k1; repeat from * to end. [16 sts]
4th and alternate rounds: Knit.
[Editor's note: Although these instructions say "alternate rounds" please note that SOME alternate (even numbered) rounds are not knitted plain. I have highlighted these exceptional rows in bold type.]
5th round: * Yfd, k2; repeat from * to end. [24 sts]
7th round: * Yfd, k3; repeat from * to end. [32 sts]

Continue to increase in this manner having one more knit stitch in each repeat until the round 'yfd, K25' has been worked.

52nd round: Knit. [208 sts]
53rd round: * Yfd, k1; yfd, k25; repeat from * to end. [224 sts]
54th and alternate rounds: Knit.
55th round: * Yfd, k3; yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k23; repeat from * to end. [232 sts]
57th round: * Yfd, k5; yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k22; repeat from * to end. [240 sts]
59th round: * Yfd, k7; yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k21; repeat from * to end. [248 sts]
61st round: * Yrn, p9; yon, sl1, k1, psso; k20; repeat from * to end. [256 sts]
62nd round: * P11, k21; repeat from * to end.
63rd round: * Yrn, p11; yon, sl1, k1, psso; k19; repeat from * to end. [264 sts]
64th round: * P13, k20; repeat from * to end.
65th round: * Yfd, k2; (yfd, k2tog) 5 times; k1, yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k18; repeat from * to end. [272 sts]
66th round: Knit.
67th round: * Yrn, p15; yon, sl1, k1, psso; k17; repeat from * to end. [280sts]
68th round: * P17, k18; repeat from * to end.
69th round: * Yrn, p17; yon, sl1, k1, psso; k16; repeat from * to end. [288sts]
70th and alternate rounds: Knit.
71st round: * Yfd, k19; yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k15; repeat from * to end. [296 sts]
73rd round: * Yfd, (k2tog, yfd, k1, yfd, k2tog, k3) twice; k2tog, yfd, k1, yfd, k2tog; yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k14; repeat from * to end. [304 sts]
75th round: * Yfd, (k2tog, yfd, k3, yfd, k2tog, k1) twice; k2tog, yfd, k3, yfd, k2tog; yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k13; repeat from * to end. [312 sts]
77th round: * Yfd, k2tog; (yfd, k5, yfd, sl1, k2tog, psso) twice; yfd, k5, yfd, k2tog; yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k12; repeat from * to end. [320 sts]
79th round: * (Yfd, k3, yfd, k2tog, k1, k2tog) 3 times; yfd, k3, yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k11; repeat from * to end. [328 sts]
81st round: * (Yfd, k5, yfd, sl1, k2tog, psso) 3 times; yfd, k5, yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k10; repeat from * to end. [336 sts]
83rd round: * Yfd, k31, yfd. sl1, k1, psso, k9; repeat from * to end. [344 sts]
85th round: * Yrn, p33, yon, sl1, k1. psso; k8; repeat from * to end. [352 sts]
86th round: * P35, k9; repeat from * to end.
87th round: * Yrn, p35, yon, sl1, k1. psso; k7; repeat from * to end. [360 sts]
88th round: Knit.
89th round: * Yfd, k2; (yfd, k2 tog) 17 times; k1, yfd, sl1, k1, psso, k6; repeat from * to end. [368 sts]
90th round: Knit.
91st round: * Yrn, p39; yon, sl1, k1, psso, k5; repeat from * to end. [376 sts]
92nd round: * P41, k6; repeat from * to end.
93rd round: * Yrn, p41; yon, sl1, k1, psso, k4; repeat from * to end. [384 sts]
94th round: Knit.
95th round: * Yrn, p43; yon, sl1, k1, psso, k3; repeat from * to end. [392 sts]
96th round: * P45, k4; repeat from * to end.
97th round: * Yrn, p45; yon, sl1, k1, psso, k2; repeat from * to end. [400 sts]
98th round: * P47, k3; repeat from * to end.
99th round: * Yfd, k2; (yfd, k2tog) 22 times; k1, yfd, sl1, k1, psso, k1; repeat from * to end. [408 sts]
100th round: Knit.
101st round: * Yrn, p49; yon, sl1, k1, psso; repeat from * to end. [416 sts]
102nd round: * P51, k1; repeat from * to end.
103rd round: * Yrn, p51, yon, k1; repeat from * to end. [432 sts]
104th round: Knit.

Cast off loosely.

Smaller side mat

Cast on 8 sts, (2 sts on one needle and 3 sts on each of 2 needles), and join in a round.

1st and 2nd round: Knit.
3rd round: * Yfd, k1; repeat from * to end. [16 sts]
4th and alternate rounds: Knit.
[Editor's note: Although these instructions say "alternate rounds" please note that SOME alternate (even numbered) rounds are not knitted plain. I have highlighted these exceptional rows in bold type.]
5th round: * Yfd, k2; repeat from * to end. [24 sts]
7th round: * Yfd, k3; repeat from * to end. [32 sts]

Continue to increase in this manner having one more knit stitch in each repeat until the round 'yfd, K12' has been worked.


26th round: Knit. [104 sts]
27th round: * Yfd, k1; yfd, k12; repeat from * to end. [120 sts]
28th and alternate rounds: Knit.
29th round: * Yfd, k3; yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k10; repeat from * to end. [128 sts]
31st round: * Yfd, k5; yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k9; repeat from * to end. [136 sts]
33rd round: * Yfd, k7; yfd, sl1, k1, psso; k8; repeat from * to end. [144 sts]
35th round: * Yfd, p9; yon, sl1, k1, psso; k7; repeat from * to end. [152 sts]
36th round: * P11, k8; repeat from * to end.
37th round: * Yfd, k2; (yfd, k2tog) 4 times; k1, yfd, s11, k1, psso; k6; repeat from * to end. [160 sts]
38th round: Knit.
39th round: * Yrn, p13; yon, s11, k1, psso; k5; repeat from * to end. [168 sts]
40th round: * P15, k6; repeat from * to end.
41st round: * (Yfd, k1, yfd, s11, k1, psso, k2, k2tog) twice; yfd, k1, yfd, s11, k1, psso; k4; repeat from * to end. [176 sts]
42nd round: Knit.
43rd round: * (Yfd, k3, yfd, s11, k1, psso, k2tog) twice; yfd, k3, yfd, s11, k1, psso; k3; repeat from * to end. [184 sts]
44th round: Knit.
45th round: * Yrn, p19, yon, sl1, k1, psso, k2; repeat from * to end. [192 sts]
46th round: * P21, k3; repeat from * to end.
47th round: *Yfd, k2; (yfd, k2tog) 9 times, k1, yfd, sl1, k1, psso, k1; repeat from * to end. [200 sts]

---------------->>>NOTE<<<-------------------
To make the clock face the right size for my clock - using my vintage yarn - I stopped knitting the table mat at this point. Please refer to the additional instructions telling you how I executed the finishing rows for the clock face.
-------------->>>End of Note<<<----------------

48th round: Knit.
49th round: * Yrn, p23; yon, s11, k1, psso; repeat from * to end. [208 sts]
50th round: * P25, k1; repeat from * to end.
51st round: * Yrn, p25; yon, k1, psso; repeat from * to end. [224 sts]
52nd round: Knit.

Cast off loosely.

To Make Up

Sew in all ends.
Damp and pin out to measurements.

Materials

2 x 20g balls Coats Chain Mercer-Crochet No 20 in selected colour to knit the table mats.
**

To knit the clock: one 50g ball of fine yarn (3 or 4ply or finer) in your chosen colour.

Set of 4 No 14 needles pointed both ends for the clock face or table mats.

A pair of No 12 (2¾mm) needles to knit the clock face surround.

Embellishments available from John Lewis branches or
knitandsew.co.uk.

Tension

Original cotton yarn knits 15 rows to one inch.**

Size matters

Largeer place mat: 14in diameter;
smaller side mat: 7in diameter

Abbreviations

yfwd/yrn/yon: "yarn forward"/"yarn round needle" /"yarn over needle"; make a stitch by passing the yarn over the needle.
sl1: slip one stitch.
psso: pass the slipped stitch(es) over.
k2tog: knit 2 stitches together.

**A word on the wool.

I used a vintage 4ply synthetic mix of "unknown origin" to knit the clock. The side mat worked up sligtly too large for my clock face, so I had to adpat the pattern (see instructions).

The recommended Coats crochet yarn would be suitable, and help ensure the clock face was not too thick.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
This can be very frustrating with lace patterns.
If you have any problems with this pattern, do not hesitate to and I will try and assist.


Footnote on knitted clocks

I did think that there would be nothing else like this - but as we know there is nothing new in this world. A while after I first discussed the project with Alison, she pointed me at this ClockTam from Knitpicks.

September 2009

Macmillan Comfort Blanket

Blanket2.jpg

The Knitter magazine, supported by Rowan, have set up the Macmillan Comfort Blanket campaign. The idea is to knit blanket squares with your knitting group, and sew them all together at the fund-raising World's Biggest Coffee Morning* on September 25th. You can hand in your completed blankets either at a drop off point or at The Alexandra Palace show in October. Details all provided in the link.

*The coffee mornings are fund-raising events; you can register to hold one or join one. Again - details all provided in the link.

Blankets that are donated to Macmillan will be used to support and raise awareness of the charity's campaign to freeze out fuel poverty for cancer patients. I am an enthusiastic supporter of Macmillan and other cancer charities involved with care of cancer sufferers (like Maggie's). Cancer is (mainly) a disease of the old, and the unpalatable truth is that the longer we live, the more likely we all are to be affected. It is a great comfort to know that such professional and caring organisations exist to help us when we need them.

At the Macmillan website you can see that Rowan have gained the support of top international designers to create a square pattern for the campaign.
That is:- "top international designers" - and - the idle hands ....!

Abbreviations

MB: make bobble by knitting into the front, back, front, back, front and back of next stitch, then pass 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th sts over 1st stitch.
[Editor's note: I know - this sounds impossible - but it is achievable. This is how the bobbles are created in the original "Debbie Bliss Square"]

m1: make a stitch by picking up the loop between the sts and knitting into the back of it.

C4B: "cable 4 back"; slip the next 2sts onto a cable needle and leave at the back of the work, k2, then k2 from cable needle.

C4F: "cable 4 front"; slip the next 2sts onto a cable needle and leave at the front of the work, k2, then k2 from cable needle.

C6B: "cable 6 back"; slip the next 3sts onto a cable needle and leave at the back of the work, k3, then k3 from cable needle.

T3B: "transpose 3 back"; slip the next (purl) st onto a cable needle and leave at the back of the work, k2, then p1 from cable needle.

T3F: "transpose 3 front"; slip the next 2 (knit) sts onto a cable needle and leave at the front of the work, p1, then k2 from cable needle.

T4B: "transpose 4 back"; slip the next 2 (purl) sts onto a cable needle and leave at the back of the work, k2, then p2 from cable needle.

T4F: "transpose 4 front"; slip the next 2 (knit) sts onto a cable needle and leave at the front of the work, p2, then k2 from cable needle.

T5B: "transpose 5 back"; slip the next 2 (purl) sts onto a cable needle and leave at the back of the work, k3, then p2 from cable needle.

T5F: "transpose 5 front"; slip the next 3 (knit) sts onto a cable needle and leave at the front of the work, p2, then k3 from cable needle.

k2tog = decrease a stitch by knitting 2 sts together.

Chain and Vines Square

This square begins and ends with a simple garter stitch border.
The following are the pattern rows used in this square:

Row 1 (right side): K6, p7, T3B, p7, C6B, p7, T3F, p7, k6.
Row 2 (wrong side): K13, p2, k8, p6, k8, p2, k13.
Row 3: K6, p6, T3B, p6, T5B, T5F, p6, T3F, p6, k6.
Row 4: K12, p2, k7, p3, k4, p3, k7, p2, k12.
Row 5: K6, p5, T3B, p5, T5B, p4, T5F, p5, T3F, p5, k6.
Row 6: K11, p2, k1, MB, k4, p3, k8, p3, k4, MB, k1, p2, k11.
Row 7: K6, p5, T3F, p5, k3, p4; pick up loop lying between st just worked and next st and MB; p1, then pass bobble st over the p st just worked, p3; k3, p5, T3B, p5, k6.
Row 8: K12, p2, k5, p3, k8, p3, k5, p2, k12.
Row 9: K6, p6, T3F, p4, T5F, p4, T5B, p4, T3B, p6, k6.
Row 10: K13, p2, k6, p3, k4, p3, k6, p2, k13.
Row 11: K6, p7, T3F, p5, T5F, T5B, p5, T3B, p7, k6.
Row 12: K12, MB, k1, p2, k7, p6, k7, p2, k1, MB, k12.

Chain and Vines Square instructions:

Cast on 45 sts and knit 4 rows garter stitch (knit every row).
Next Row (increase row): K8; ( m1, k5) 7 times; k2. [52 sts]

Next Row (wrong side): work 10th row of the pattern.
Next Row: work 11th row of the pattern.
Next Row: work 12th row of the pattern.

Now work rows 1-12 four times, then rows 1 and 2 again.

Next Row (decrease row): K7; ( k2tog, k4) 7 times; k3. [47 sts]
Knit 4 more rows in garter stitch.

Cast off knitwise from the wrong side of the work.

Lattice Square:

This square begins and ends with a garter stitch bobble border, in the same design as the original Debbie Bliss Square.
The following are the pattern rows used in this square:

Row 1 (right side): K3, MB, k3; p7, k2, p8, C4B, p8, k2, p7; k3, MB, k3.
Row 2 (wrong side): K14, p2, k8, p4, k8, p2, k14.
Row 3: K7, p7, T4F, p4, T4B, T4F, p4, T4B, p7, k7.
Row 4: K16; (p2, k4) 3 times; p2, k16.
Row 5: K7, p9, T4F, T4B, p4, T4F, T4B, p9, k7.
Row 6: K18, p4, k8, p4, k18.
Row 7: K3, MB, k3; p11, C4B, p4; pick up loop lying between st just worked and next st and MB; p1, then pass bobble st over the p st just worked, p3; C4F, p11; k3, MB, k3.
Row 8: As row 6.
Row 9: K7, p9, T4B, T4F, p4, T4B, T4F, p9, k7.
Row 10: As row 4.
Row 11: K7, p7, T4B, p4, T4F, T4B, p4, T4F, p7, k7.
Row 12: As row 2.
Row 13: K7, p7, k2, p4; pick up loop lying between st just worked and next st and MB; p1, then pass bobble st over the p st just worked, p3; C4B, p4; pick up loop lying between st just worked and next st and MB; p1, then pass bobble st over the p st just worked, p3; k2, p7,k7.
Row 14: K14, p2, k8, p4, k8, p2, k14.

Lattice Square instructions:

Cast on 47 sts and knit 4 rows garter stitch (knit every row).
Next Row (right side): K3; (MB, k4) 8 times; MB, k3.
Knit 3 more rows in garter stitch.
Next Row (increase row): K11; ( m1, k6) 4 times; m1, k12. [52 sts]

Next Row (wrong side): work 2nd row of the pattern.

Now work the pattern rows as follows:

Rows 1-14: Work rows 1 to 14 inclusive.
Rows 15-38: Work rows 3 to 14 inclusive, twice.
Rows 39-48: Work rows 3 to 12 inclusive.
Rows 49: Work row 1.

Next Row (decrease row): K11; ( k2tog, k5) 4 times; k2tog, k11. [47 sts]
Knit 4 more rows in garter stitch.
Next Row (right side): K3; (MB, k4) 8 times; MB, k3.
Knit 2 more rows in garter stitch.

Cast off knitwise from the wrong side of the work.

Making up

Sew the squares together in 5 rows of 8 squares each, so the blanket measures approximately 40 inches by 64 inches.
Sew in all ends.
Work a crochet or knitted border around the whole thing - if you feel up to it after all that knitting!

Materials

One ball of double knitting yarn at about 100m or 108 yards in length makes about 2 squares.

Rowan are supporting this initiative but you are not compelled to use their wools - you are encouraged to use wool from your stash.

Size matters

8 inch squares making up a 40x64 inch blanket.

Tension

General DK tension: 22 stitches and 30 rows to 4 inches over stocking stitch. or gauge to make the 8 inch square.

These bobble squares: 23 sts to 4 inches using 3¾mm needles.

A Word
on the Wool.

Unfortunately my "stash" is not overflowing with left-over double knitting wools of the right type to use for this project.

In the end I used some Phildar yarns that I had intended for another long-abandoned project. These yarns are robust and high quality - about 25% wool and superwash. Therefore - both warm and practical.

The yarn used for the bobble squares is Oxygene which is apparently "anti-bacterial" (!) - 25% wool, 35% chlorofibre, 40% acrylic - and knits to a tension of 23stsand 30 rows to 4 inches on 3½mm needles.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern there is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.


Pattern inspirations for the squares

Blanket1.jpg

I used my squares in combination with the "Debbie Bliss Square" shown below.



My designs above are inspired by her other bobble pattern designs, which I have adapted to make a double knitting wool weight 8 inch patch for this blanket.
Every alternate square in my blanket is knitted plain. Above is (a section of) the completed blanket. I did a rather pleasing edging adapted from a stitch used as part of a sweater pattern.



Note that my "flag dishcloth" square (POM February 2007) could also be adapted to make an 8 inch square. Use a DK wool that knits to 22 or 23 sts to 4 inches. Use 3½mm needles and cast on 45 sts instead of 49, knitting a 3st garter stitch border instead of 5. Repeat the 10 row pattern 5 times in all, and knit a 6-8 row border to start and finish your square, making up the 8 inches in length.
You could knit other guernsey patterns for as a theme for different squares - like a sampler. But - remember to check your tension. Your squares need to be about 45 sts by 62 rows in st st.


Rather Pleasing Edging

The method for the basic stitch pattern is as follows, assuming using a combination of DK and extra-thick chunky type wool, and working back and forth across the rows on two needles:

Row 1 (right side): Using DK and suitable needles (eg 4mm), knit.
Row 2 (wrong side): Using DK, purl.
Row 3 (right side): Using chunky contrast, change to large needles, (eg 7mm or more), slip1, knit one to end of row (you are knitting alternate stitches - you need to ease the stitches in order to slip them).
Row 4 (wrong side): Using chunky contrast, knit the sts you knitted on the previous row, and slip the sts you slipped.
Row 5 (right side): Change back to DK and smaller needles and knit every st across row.
Row 6 (wrong side): Using DK, purl.

When edging the blanket, I picked up sts around the whole blanket, and I worked from the right side for all rows, so on row 4, I purled the chunky sts, and all all other rows were knitted. To achieve this with such a large number of sts round the whole blanket, I started every row with a new ball of yarn, and worked in sections, completing all rows and casting off for a section before picking up the next set of sts. I did not break the multiple yarn strands between sections.


Cabling without a Needle

It was while I was making the Estonian socks from the Interweave Knits Sock book that I first became aware that this was a bona fide knitting technique. Before that, I always thought it was just some dexterous manipulation that I was forced into when knitting on the train and found that I had forgotten to take my cable needle with me. Now it seems to be the technique of the moment, with a Beyond the Basics lesson on it in the 2009 autumn issue of Interweave Knits, plus a full explanation in Knitting Daily.

It works like this:- for example, when cabling over 4 stitches as in C4B above, work to just before the stitches to be cabled. With the yarn at the back of the work, slip all four stitches purlwise to the right-hand needle. Bring the left-hand needle to the back of the work and insert it into the backs the two sts further from the left hand needle.

Between the left thumb and forefinger, pinch the base of the four stitches firmly. Pull the right-hand needle completely free of all four stitches; half will be on the left-hand needle; half will be free for a moment. Maintaining the front/back positions as established, quickly reinsert the right-hand needle into the free stitches at the front of the work. Make sure all the stitches are seated correctly on the needle; if they are held firmly, the stitches won't have twisted or moved at all during the time that they were dropped.

Finally slip the two stitches on the right-hand needle back to the left-hand needle. The stitches are now crossed over. Knit all four sts as usual to complete the C4B.

This works well for cabling with smaller numbers of stitches (less than 6) and proved to be very useful for me while knitting these squares.

August 2009

Beaded Doilies

Doilies2009.jpg

Knitted doilies from the early 1960s

These were frequently used when I was a child, as everyone had a milk jug to protect - and often as not, no refrigerator. I need to point our here, (just to be clear), that I did not come into the world during the era when milk was delivered daily straight from a churn into your own jug - ours did come in bottles.
Actually, I exaggerate our level of refinement "chez nous" - we did not have our milk in a jug as the norm. Mrs Blake did though, and I remember her lovely hand-made beaded doilies, to which I even now aspire - even though my milk is safe in a carton in the fridge.

I also remember camping with the Girl Guides, and protecting our dishes of jam with net cloths - only to find them later covered in wasps, munching away, having casually sliced their way through the netting with their sharp little mandibles! [Not members of the saw-fly family for nothing].

Larger doily

Start with 10ch, join with slip stitch to form a ring.

Pass loops on to knitting needle thus:
* insert hook into next ch and pull loop through, pass loop on to knitting needle; repeat from * 8 times more, dividing the 10 sts over three needles (3 on each of two needles and 4 on one).

1st Round: Knit.
2nd Round (and every alternate up to the 14th round):
knit.
The instructions give one repeat of the pattern stitches only and this is repeated 9 times more on every round (10 times in all).

3rd Round: Yfwd, k1.
5th Round: Yfwd, k2.
7th Round: Yfwd, k3.
9th Round: Yfwd, k1, yfwd, k1, k2tog.
11th Round: Yfwd, k1, yfwd, k2, k2tog.
13th Round: Yfwd, k1, yfwd, k3, k2tog.
15th Round: Yfwd, k1, yfwd, k2, yfwd, k2, k2tog.
16th Round: K7, k2tog.
17th Round: Yfwd, k1, yfwd, k2, yfwd, k3, k2tog.

Rep 16th and 17th rounds until 41 st round is completed, having one knit stitch more before k2tog at end of each repeat. [220 sts]

42nd Round (and all even rounds unless otherwise stated): knit

From now on one repeat of pattern stitches is given and is repeated 19 times more (20 times in all).

43rd Round: K10, yfwd, k1, yfwd.
45th Round: K10, yfwd, k3, yfwd.
47th Round: K10, yfwd, k2tog, yfwd, k1, yfwd, slip1, k1, psso, yfwd.
49th Round: Slip1, k1, psso, k6, (k2tog, yfwd) twice, k3, yfwd, slip1, k1, psso, yfwd.
51st Round: Slip1, k1, psso, k4, (k2tog, yfwd) 3 times, k1, yfwd, (slip 1, k1, psso, yfwd) twice.
53rd Round: Slip1, k1, psso, k2, ( k2tog, yfwd) 3 times, k3, yfwd, (slip 1, k1, psso, yfwd) twice.
55th Round: Slip2, k2tog, psso, yfwd, (k2tog, yfwd) 3 times, k1, yfwd, (slip1, k1, psso, yfwd) 3 times.
57th Round: K1, (k2tog, yfwd) 3 times, k3, (yfwd, slip1, k1, psso) 3 times.
59th Round: Slip the last st of each right needle on to left needle, slip 1, k2tog, psso, yfwd, (k2tog, yfwd) 3 times, k1, yfwd, (slip 1, k1, psso, yfwd) 3 times.

61st Round: K1, (k2tog,yfwd) 3 times, k1, k twice into next st, k1, (yfwd, slip 1, k1, psso) 3 times.
62nd Round: Slip the last stitch of each right needle on to left needle, slip 1, k2tog, psso, (k2tog, yfwd) twice, (k3, yfwd) twice, slip1, k1, psso, yfwd, slip1, k1, psso.

63rd Round: K8, k5 sts into next st, k7.

65th Round: Slip the last stitch of each right needle on to left needle, slip 1, k2tog, psso, k2tog, yfwd, k4, yfwd, k2tog, yfwd, k1, yfwd, slip1, k1, psso, yfwd, k4, yfwd, slip1, k1, psso.

67th Round: Slip last stitch of each right needle on left needle, slip 1, k2tog, psso, k5, yfwd, k2tog, yfwd, k3, yfwd, slip 1, k1, psso, yfwd, k5.
69th Round: K1, yfwd, slip 1, k1, psso, k1,
(k2tog, yfwd) twice, k5, (yfwd, slip1, k1, psso) twice, k1, k2tog, yfwd.

71st Round: K2, yfwd, slip1, k2tog, psso, yfwd, k2tog, yfwd, slip 1, k1, psso, k3, k2tog, yfwd, slip 1, k1, psso, yfwd, slip 1, k2tog, psso, yfwd, k1.
73rd Round: K1, k2tog, yfwd, k1, yfwd, k2tog, yfwd, k1, yfwd, slip 1, k1, psso, k1, k2tog, (yfwd, k1, yfwd, slip1, k1, psso) twice.

74th Round: Knit.

Crochet Edging

75th Round: Slip last stitch of each right needle on to left needle. Insert hook into place near stitch just transferred and pull working thread through, * (insert hook into next 3 sts as if to knit, thread over and pull through, thread over and pull through 2 loops - dc made - slip the 3 worked sts from needle, 3ch) twice;
(insert hook into next 2 sts and make a dc as before, 7ch) twice;
insert hook into next 3 sts and make a dc as before;
(7ch, insert hook into next 2 sts and make a dc as before) twice;
3ch, insert hook into next 3 sts and make a dc as before, 3ch.
Repeat from *, ending with 1 slip stitch into first dc.
Fasten off.

[Editor's note: This final crochet row does take a long time - it is fiddly and took me well over an hour and a half of fiddling. However, you can be encouraged by the fact that this is your very last step to finishing - once completed, it's all over.]

Smaller doily

Start with 8ch, join with slip stitch to form a ring. Pass loop on to knitting needle and continue as for larger doily, noting that repeat is worked 7 times more (8 times in all) instead of 9.

Divide the 8 sts, 3 on 2 needles and 2 on 1.

Work as for larger doily until 29th round is completed.

30th Round: K14, k2tog.
From now on one rep is given and is repeated 11 times more.
31st Round: K9, yfwd, k1, yfwd.
32nd Round: (and all even rounds unless otherwise stated) Knit.
33rd Round: K9, yfwd, k3, yfwd.
35th Round: K9, yfwd, k2tog, yfwd, k1, yfwd, slip1, k1, psso, yfwd.
37th Round: Slip1, k1, psso, k5, (k2tog, yfwd) twice, k3, yfwd, slip1, k1, psso, yfwd.
39th Round: Slip1, k1, psso, k3, ( k2tog, yfwd) 3 times, k1, yfwd, (slip1, k1, psso, yfwd) twice.
41st Round: Slip1, k1, psso, k1, (k2tog, yfwd) 3 times, k3, yfwd, (slip1, k1, psso, yfwd) twice.
43rd Round: Slip1, k2tog, psso, yfwd, (k2tog, yfwd) 3 times, k1, yfwd, (slip1, k1, psso, yfwd) 3 times.

Continue as for larger doily starting from 57th round to end.

Making up

Sew in all ends.
Dampen and pin out to measurements.

Sew beads around edges - or make a set for your side table....

Materials

Coats Mercer Crochet Cotton No 40 (20 gram), 2 balls in selected colour.

1.00 mm (or No 4) steel crochet hook.

Set of four double pointed No 13 (2¼mm).
[Editor's note: these need to be long needles - I managed the larger doily on 8 inch but these were not long enough. You increase from 10 sts to over 400 and it is heart breaking to lose sts at the needles ends - it is essentially not recoverable with a lace pattern like this.]

Size matters

13 inch diameter for larger and 9½ inch for smaller.

Abbreviations

ch: chain
yfwd: yarn forward, or "yarn over"; make a stitch by passing the yarn over the needle.
psso: pass the slipped stitch(es) over
dc: double crochet remembering that this is UK notation, and in the US is referred to as single crochet.

A Word
on the Wool.

The recommended cotton was Coats Mercer Crochet 40. You need a fine thread to get the right drape - not necessarily insect proof but keep extra leaves out of the salad bowl (ones you haven't put in there intentionally...).

Example used Crochet cotton 40 in white for the smaller doily and Anchor Leinen 20 (colour 392, 50g ball: 430m) - a fine linen thread made in Germany. In either English or German websites I can only find the thicker No 10 referenced.

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any pattern there is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading. This is particularly annoying with a fine lace pattern.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

Doily1.jpg

Doily2.jpg


December 2008

Plum Pudding Cosy

PuddingCosy3.jpg

A last minute novelty gift from 1960.
It is crocheted with a double thickness of wool; this can be a nuisance but it is a good way to get that tweedy pudding-mix effect.
"Quick-as-lightening fillers for amusing family presents."

Instructions

The pattern includes a tea-cosy in the shape of a Christmas Pudding, and a tea-pot stand in the shape of a plate.

Cosy

Using wool double, with No 7 hook and using the brown and tan wools together (to make a tweedy effect), make 4 chain and join into a ring with a slip stitch. Work 8dc into ring.

1st round: (2dc into each dc) 8 times [16 dc]
Mark the end of the round with a coloured thread.
[Editor's note: You just weave a piece of coloured thread between the last and first sts of each round such that you can just pull it out when you have finished.]
2nd round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next dc) 8 times [24 dc]
3rd round: 1dc in next dc all round.
4th round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 2 dc) 8 times [32 dc]
5th round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 3dc) 8 times [40 dc]
6th round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 4dc) 8 times [48 dc]
7th and 8th rounds: 1dc in next dc all round.
9th round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 5dc) 8 times [56 dc]
10th and 11th rounds: 1dc in next dc all round.

Start opening for handle by turning the work and working backwards and forwards in rows.

12th row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next dc all across to back to start of round [56 dc]. Turn with 1ch.
13th row: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 6dc) 8 times [64 dc]. Turn with 1ch.

Start opening for spout, working each side of cosy separately.
[Editor's note: I have altered the pattern here and started the spout opening 3 rows higher than intended in the original. Even with this alteration, the cosy fits only a conventional teapot, where the spout comes from the base of the pot. It does not fit my deco teapot design where the spout is high up the pot, on a level with the handle.]

††
14th row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next dc 32 times [32 dc]. Turn with 1ch.
15th row: with right side facing 1dc in next dc 32 times. Turn with 1ch.
16th row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next dc 32 times. Turn with 1ch.
17th row: with right side facing 1dc in next dc 32 times. Turn with 1ch.
18th row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next 15 dc; 2 dc into next dc; 1dc in next 16 dc [33 dc]. Turn with 1ch.
19th row: with right side facing 1dc in next dc 33 times. Turn with 1ch.
20th row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next 16 dc; 2 dc into next dc; 1dc in next 16 dc [34 dc]. Turn with 1ch.
21st row: with right side facing 1dc in next dc 34 times. Turn with 1ch.
22nd row: with wrong side facing 1dc in next 16 dc; 2 dc into next dc; 1dc in next 17 dc [35 dc]. Break wool.
††

[Editor's note: Here's a picture of the cosy with one side worked, showing the coloured thread marking the early rounds.]

Rejoin wool at spout end to work the other side of the cosy. With right side facing, repeat from †† to ††. Join spout opening with one slip stitch. 1ch; turn the work.

With right side facing, return to working in rounds. Work 3 rounds of dc, joining handle opening in first round.

Turn the work, and crochet one round of slip stitches. Fasten off.

Icing

With number 7 hook and white bouclé wool used single, work as for first 6 increase rounds of the plate, [56dc].

Next round: * 1dc in next dc; 4 tr in next dc; 1dc into each of the next 3dc; repeat from * 9 times. Fasten off.

[Editor's note: I extemporised with the crochet here. You can form "realistic" icing/snow either with extra rows of long and short crochet stitches, or by adding embroidery when you stitch the icing in place on the cosy.]

Making up:

Stitch icing to top of cosy, and use white bouclé wool to embroider irregular shapes round edge of icing. Using black wool embroider spots on cosy to represent currants as required.
Sew holly decoration to top of pudding.

Sew in all ends.

Plate (not shown)

Using wool double, with No 7 hook and white, make 4 chain and join into a ring with a slip stitch.

1st round: 1ch, 8dc into ring; 1 slip stitch into top of 1st dc.
[Editor's note: Mark the end of the rounds with a coloured thread, as before.]
2nd round: (2dc into each dc) 8 times [16 dc]
3rd round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next dc) 8 times [24 dc]
4th round: (2dc in 1dc; 1dc in next 2 dc) 8 times [32 dc]

Continue increasing in this way, 8 sts in every round, until 8 rounds have been worked from the start [64 dc].
Work 5 rounds without shaping.
Change to number 10 hook and continue with single wool rim:-

Next round: * 2 dc in next dc; repeat from * to end of round [128 dc].
Next round: 1dc in next dc all round.
Next round: 1 dc in each of next 2 dc; * 2 dc in next dc; 1 dc into each of next 20 dc; repeat from * to end of round.

Work 2 rounds without shaping.

Join in red, and work 1 round. Fasten off red wool.

Turn the work and with wrong side facing, using white wool double, work 1 round of slip stitches into last round of dc. Fasten off white wool.

Press plate lightly. Thread a length of white wool through last round of base - that is before the start of the rim - and fasten off securely. This will retain the shape of the plate.

Materials

50g balls each in dark brown and tan double knitting wool, (used double throughout), and one ball of a white bouclé double knitting wool for the icing. Scraps of red and black for stripes on the plate.

Holly sprig decorations in paper or plastic.

One each Nos. 7 (4.5mm) and 10 (3¼mm) crochet hooks.

Crochet abbreviations:

ch = chain
tr = treble crochet
dc = double crochet

Remember these are English crochet instructions where dc is equivalent to US single crochet - see "Terminology" in the side bar.

Tension

4dc to an inch.
Note:
these are UK crochet instructions - to work a double crochet: insert hook in next stitch, draw loop through, wool over hook, and draw through both loops.

Size matters

Intended to fit a 2 pint pot (that's UK pints which are each 20 fluid ounces not 16). Check out the diagram with the dimensions of my cosy.

A word on the wool.

I used a vintage tweed DK (used double) which was a perfect "pudding" colour, being a rich brown and having flecks of different colours, so I did not need to use two different colours to work together.
I did not have any bouclé wool, so used a smooth wool; however Stylecraft seem to offer come resonably prices bouclé double knits (eg Carousel or Sirocco).

Disclaimer
(well...almost)

In transposing any patterns it is always a risk that errors will be introduced, in spite of dedicated proof reading.
If you have any problems with this pattern, please and I will try and assist.

PuddingCosy4.jpg



Pattern adaptations:

If you would prefer to make a knitted cosy for the main body rather than crochet then here are some instructions for a ribbed cosy. You can still make the white top and holly using crochet as before, and fasten it only in the centre on top of the cosy, which will allow the ribs to adapt nicely to the shape of the teapot.

The cosy is worked in double knitting wool used singly on No 8 (4mm) needles. [The crocheted cosy is worked with two different coloured DK wools worked together to give a tweedy "pudding" effect. I used a flecked wool for my cosy which would work well for this knitted pattern.].

Measurements: width all tround 16 inches, height 6 inches.
Tension: 12 sts and 17 rows to 2 inches measured over pattern.

Instructions:
**
Cast on 47 sts and work in pattern as follows:
1st row: K3, * p2, k2; repeat from * to end
2nd row: K1, * p2, k2; repeat from * to last 2 sts, p1, k1.
These two rows form the pattern. Continue until work measures 5 inches, ending with a second row.

Shape Top:
1st row: * K2tog, k1, p1; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1. [35 sts]
2nd row: K1, * p1, k2; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.
3rd row: K2, * p1,k2; repeat from * to end.
4th row: as second row.
5th row: * K1, p2tog; repeat from * to last 2sts, k2. [24 sts]
6th-8th rows: * K1, p1; repeat from * to last 2sts, k2.
9th row: K1,* k2tog; repeat from * to last stitch, k1. [13 sts]
10th row: K1, purl to last stitch, k1.
11th row: K2tog 6 times, k1. [7 sts]
**

Break yarn and leave sts on a safety pin.
Work a second piece from ** to **. Break yarn and leaving an end. Thread through sts on needle and then through the 7 sts on the safety pin. Draw up tightly and fasten off.
Sew up the sides, leaving an opening for handle and spout.
[Editor's note: This design allows you to sew the front an back seams, and allow handle and spout openings to exactly match your teapot.]

Decorate with the crochet icing and holly as desired, but leave edges of icing free.

November 2007

Cosy covers - Sixties retro

Cosy_cover_sixties.jpg

This is my modern version of a hot-water bottle cover. The cover is designed to fit a microwavable hot pad - link for this under "materials". The pads are conveniently small, and much safer (to lie on) than a hot-water bottle.
The pattern stitch from 1968 was used for a tea-cosy (colours Jade, Pink, and White), and a cushion cover (colours Brown, Amber, and White). I think the cushion cover, (style and colour scheme), is more authentically late 60s that the cosy. Although a tea cosy was de rigeur in our house, I think tea bags with and without the use of tea pots was becoming more prevalent by that time.

Instructions

With No. 11 needles and main colour (red), cast on 58 stitches.
Knit 4 rows in garter stitch (every row knit), then one row purl.
Do not break off the main colour (red).

**Change to number 10 needles and commence pattern as follows, using second colour (orange):

Row 1: (right side) *K4, slip 2; repeat from * to last 4 sts, K4.
Row 2: *P4, slip 2; repeat from * to last 4 sts, P4.
Row 3 and 4: As rows 1 and 2.
Break orange wool, and continue in red.
Row 5: knit
Row 6: purl
Row 7: Using the third colour (yellow) K1, *slip 2, K4; repeat from * to last 3sts, slip 2, K1.
Row 8: P1, *slip 2, P4; repeat from * to last 3sts, slip 2, P1.
Row 9 and 10: As rows 7 and 8.
Break yellow wool, and continue in red.
Row 11: knit
Row 12: purl

Rows 13-24: repeat rows 1-12.
Rows 25-30: repeat rows 1-6.

Change to number 11 needles and continue in garter stitch for 15 rows. Purl one row.**

Repeat from ** to ** three times, then rows 1-30 again.

Change to number 11 needles and work in garter stitch for 4 rows. Cast off.

Making up - Press the piece lightly on the wrong side under a damp cloth with a hot iron.
Fold the cover to form a bag as shown in the picture, and sew up the side edges, on the inside, either oversewing or with backstitch.
Sew in all the ends on the wrong side.

Crochet edging - Using the main colour, (red), work a dc edge around the flap of the cover with ties as follows:

With right side facing, starting at the side edge, work 6 dc up edge of the garter st band, 15 dc up the honeycomb edge, 2dc up to corner, 3 dc into the corner st.
Then work across the cast-off edge making 2 dc into every 3 cast off sts approximately. After the first 6 dc (or where you want to place a tie) work the first tie by making 40 chain, then working 1dc into each chain back down to the knitted edge. Continue to work dc into the cast-off sts, making a second tie in the centre of the flap, after approximately 14 dc. Work another 14 dc and make another tie (match the position of the first tie). Work to the edge, 3dc into the corner st and then finish to match the other side of the flap.
Fasten off.

Work 3 more ties by making 40 chain, then working 1 row of dc into each chain. Sew the ties on to the cover to match the positions of the ties on the flap.
[Editor's note: If you want to avoid the crochet altogether you could sew on ribbon ties in the appropriate places.]

Materials

Original pattern calls for three contrast colours, (red, orange and yellow).
Example shown is knitted in 4 ply - 1 x 50g ball of each colour.

One pair each of number 10, an No 11 needles.
Crochet hook.

One hot water bottle "replacement core", (available to order on the web).

Tension

The wool should knit to a basic tension over st st of 28st to 4 inches (10cm) on No 10 (3¼mm) needles.

Size matters

One size.

A word on the wool.

I used Phildar Lambswool (a 4 ply wool/acrylic mix) left over from another project.

Here is a version adapted for a light worsted cotton yarn (Rowan Cotton Glace). For this version, cast on 52 sts.

Cosy_cover_sixties2.jpg

Cosy covers - Fifties retro

Cosy_cover_red.jpg

This is a pattern from 1956 "reversible bottle-cover" (sic) - though why the quotes, why the hyphen, and why the description reversible, I really am not sure. Originally a cover for a hot-water bottle, I have adapted it to fit a microwavable pad. The knitting turned out to be an interesting shape, and in consequence made for an interesting pattern, (probably not as intended). I used a bright red and white combination, which reminded me of a 1950s accessory set. The original recommended colours were "powder blue and white".
In the days when pattern illustrations were not in colour, the colour names were much more vivid and descriptive; modern names tend to try and evoke an emotion rather than a colour. I do love reading these old patterns with the colours - "lipstick red" "primrose yellow" "mimosa" "frosty lime" - you could just eat them - a feast for the mind's eye.

Instructions

First piece - with No. 11 needles and first colour, cast on 4 stitches.

Row 1: Inc in every st (8 sts)
Row 2: K3, inc by knitting into the front and back of the next st - place a st marker - inc, K3 (10 sts)
Row 3: Inc, K3, inc in next 2 sts, K3, inc. (14 sts)
Row 4: K6, inc by knitting into the front and back of the next st - place a st marker - inc, K6 (16 sts)
Row 5: Inc, K6, inc in next 2 sts, K6, inc. (20 sts)
Row 6: K9, inc by knitting into the front and back of the next st - place a st marker - inc, K9 (22 sts)

With the right side facing for row 7 place a row marker on this side of the work, to mark it as the right side of the work.

Then continue working as before, increasing at both ends of the row, and in the middle, on odd (right side) rows; increase only in the middle on even (wrong side) rows.

After a while, the stitches will become crowded and the shape hard to manage on just 2 needles. At this point, spread the sts evenly across two needles, discarding the centre st marker; continue to work back and forth across the needles using a third needle.

The work will take on a triangular, or arrow shape.
[Editor's note: The original pattern is intended to form a triangle, I could not make this happen - the wool I used may have a different rows:sts ratio than the one recommended. This shape and resulting cover is flexible and should suit whatever wool you use.]

Continue working until you have 105 sts on each side of the centre.
Leave the completed piece to one side without casting off. Do not break off the wool.
[Editor's note: The original pattern was intended for a hot water bottle. They advised to knit until there are 139sts with the 3 ply wool. The base of the triangle has to be long enough to wrap around your hot water bottle or heated pad; you can choose to stop knitting when you feel it is wide enough.]

Second piece - work a second triangle (or arrow) in the contrast colour.

Lay the pieces out with the point of one arrow to the base corner of the other arrow, (see picture below).

Continue working with one of the available colours (I used the red). Cast off the two rows of knitting together, using a "three-needle cast off"(see picture below), fairly tightly.

[Editor's note: You put your working needle into the first st on the front needle and the first st on the second needle behind; you pull your loop through and knit both sts off the needles together. You have one st on your working (usually right hand) needle. You repeat so there are two sts on your working needle. You pass the first st you knitted over the second; continue casting off in this way.]

This is how it looks half way through; ideally the work should lie flat at the cast off edge:

Next you put the other two edges together - again the point of one arrow is next to the base corner of the other arrow, (see picture below):

Cast off the two rows together. You are left with a sort of tube; turn it so that the cast off edges are inside. The next picture shows a hot water bottle placed in the tube.

The arrow points are arranged centre front and back.

Fold up one of the ends and sew the diagonal seams in place from the wrong side. (I sewed the tip of my white arrow for the closed end). At the other end, make a chain using the crochet hook and sew in place as a loop for the button at the (red) arrow tip.
Place your "replacement core" in the cover and fold over the top of the cover to an appropriate position and mark the place for the closing button.
Make a crochet flower to act as a button, and sew in place.
[Editor's note: You know ho to make a crochet flower without instructions don't you?
O, all right then; this is what I did...]

Crochet flower - begin by making a slip loop with your first colour as if you were starting a crochet chain, and crochet into this loop for your first round. Ensure that the loop "slips" (can be tightened) from the tail end of your work, not the working end.

Round 1: using the first colour, crochet 8 dc into your loop; adjust the slip loop until the sts fit nicely.
Round 2: chain 3, (1 htr 1ch) into each of the 8 dc then ss join to the first 3ch.
Round 3: 1dc into first chain space, (3ch, 1dc into next ch sp) to end of round, 3ch, ss into first dc. Fasten off.

Make a second flower in the second colour.

Round 1: using the second colour, crochet 8 dc into your loop; adjust the slip loop until the sts fit nicely.
Round 2: ss into first dc, (3ch, ss into next 1dc) to end of round, 3ch, ss into first dc. Fasten off.

Place second flower on top of first, and sew through both layers, onto the cover at the marked position for the button.

Materials

Original pattern calls for 2 oz each of two contrast colours in 3ply.
Example shown is knitted in 4 ply - 1 x 50g ball of each colour.

One pair of number 11 needles, with a spare pair (or set or 4) to aid in the construction.
One No 11 (3mm) crochet hook.

One hot water bottle "replacement core", (available to order on the web).

Tension

Garter stitch is difficult to measure but the wool should knit to a basic tension over st st of 28st to 4 inches (10cm) on No 11 (3mm) needles.

Size matters

One size.

A word on the wool.

I used an acrylic 4ply; not ideal, but these covers can take some wear and tear.

February 2007

Flag dishcloth

   Dishcloth design based on traditional guernsey flag pattern, (colour: Hot Pink).

Instructions

With No. 7 needles, cast on 49 stitches
Work in garter stitch (every row knit) for 6 rows.

Commence pattern as follows:
[Note that each row begins and ends with K5 making a garter stitch border].

Row 1: K5, (K9, P1) 3 times, knit to end.
Row 2: K6, (P8, K2) 3 times, P8, K5
Row 3: K5, (K7, P3), 3 times, K8, P2, K5
Row 4: K8, (P6, K4) 3 times, P6, K5
Row 5: K5, (K5, P5), 3 times, K5, P4, K5
Row 6: K10, (P4, K6) 3 times, P4, K5
Row 7: K5, (K3, P7), 3 times, K3, P6, K5
Row 8: K12, (P2, K8) 3 times, P2, K5
Row 9: K5, (K1, P9), 3 times, K1, P8, K5
Row 10: knit across all sts.

These rows form one pattern.

Repeat the 10-row pattern 5 times more (6 times in all).
[Note that this is one more pattern in each dimension than shown in the photograph;
these instructions have a centre panel with 6x4 flag patterns].

Work 6 rows in garter stitch, then cast off all 49 sts.

Finishing - sew in all ends, and press lightly with a damp cloth.

Materials

One (2 oz) ball of Lily Sugar n'Cream cotton.

One pair No. 7 needles.

Tension

20 sts x 26 rows to 4 inches measured over stocking stitch on No 7 (4½mm) needles.

Size matters

The pattern as written should make a dishcloth about 10 inches square. My original in the picture is slightly smaller.

Flag pattern detail:

© Christina Coutts 2007

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